Plastic T-Shaped strip.

I figure this is going to be pretty hard to explain but here goes. I have to hang several vertical panels, that slide. The panels will be made out of very stiff fabric, that will be mounted in such away that it does not gather when pushed out of the way.
My thinking was to cut a T-slot in a piece of wood, and then mount that piece upside down, and find a piece of t-shaped plastic, that would be mounted in the t-slot, and then velcro the fabric panel to the T-Shaped plastic. I have a couple of question.
Can wood on wood be made to slide fairly well, over a long period of time? Does anybody know where I could find T-Shaped plastic? I assume I should use hardwood for the piece that has the T-slot, any particular hardwood that would be best for this type of application?
Does any of this make any sense?
Thanks, Garry.
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What are the dimensions you are considering? Door sized or what?
If the plastic is not too thick you could get some sheet and cut a T out of a square.
As to wood on wood sliding, could you use something similar to how a dresser drawer works?
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On 2004-08-21 20:35:35 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com.gov (Rileyesi) said:

The max panel size will be 6ft wide by 10ft tall. I am not sure whether I could use the same idea as a drawer slide (dovetailed) until I figure out the weight of the panel. I thought plastic on wood might slide better than wood on wood, but I have no experience in this type of application to confirm it.
One constraint is that these panels will be stacked 4 deep, so we need like to keep the distance between each panel at a minimum.
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has some that will support up to 300#. http://www.door-hardware.net/pockethardware.html
Not affiliated in any way, just trying to help out.
Possibly patio door hardware would work also, especially the screen sections.
HTH Big John
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(Rileyesi) said:

I was needing to black out my bedroom (shift work) and made seven 3/4" thick panels 2' x 7'6", then hung them from closet door hardware. I used 4 sets of hardware, lag bolted to the ceiling and each other, so the tracks were doubled up side by side and end to end, if you can picture that. The panels weigh about 15-20 pounds each and have been sliding effortlessly for about 5 years now. I have also built shoji screens, wood sliding on wood as is track doors, with an oil finish and occaisional wax, they slide just fine. I would probably use hardware for your application. Can you describe your panels furthur?
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hardware?
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is this the molding of which you speak?
http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/product_details.cfm?&offerings_id 81&objectgroup_id$0&catidG&filter=t%20molding
UCS308 wrote:

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calmly ranted:

Why not put a frame around it so you have solid, lightweight doors with fabric covering?

What size are these things, and what fabric? Now I'm curious.

Perfect timing: See the newest copy of Fine Woodworking mag. It has an article on sliding wooden doors.

Maybe the Plastic T Manufacturing Company in Boise, Idaho? *

Oak is available and not expensive. But if you want long, long term sliders, why not use UHMW poly as a contact strip?

No, but thanks for asking.
* That was a humor-generated name. Don't waste too much time trying to find it. It doesn't exist AFAIK.
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The panels I am referring to are going to be used to cover windows in a room that has 14ft ceilings. The idea is that the panels will slide out of the way as a solid piece.
There will be up-to 4 panels per wall, there are two walls.
I am focusing on the track right now as that would seem to be hardest part.
After comments in this group I am now thinking it might be possible to use sliding dovetail ( think of a wooden undermounted drawer slide, and turn it upside down) to build the tracks. I would prefer to use manufactured track, and some kind of T-Slide, but sliding dovetails might be a good back-up.
The longest wall is 17ft. The piece of wood for this wall would contain two tracks, 2 sliding dovetails. Each of the two tracks would contain 2 panels, 1 being moved off to the left, and the other 1 to right.
So more questions. .
Any comments on sliding dovetails for this purpose?
I am planning on using hard maple for the tracks, and hard maple of the slide, neither will be very visible so I could mix the woods if that would provide a better slide.
Is maple a sound choice? Finding a piece that is 17ft long might be tricky.
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