Planing Teak

I need some teak, don't have a planer, and the any teak I can find locally is rough.
The lumberyard will plane the 7 boards I want for $40. I figured that was a good downpayment on a planer, so I posted a message about which planer to buy. One reply said that teak was very hard on planers and I should figure on a new set of blades afterwards. If I am going to have to buy new blades, it would make sense just to pay the $40 and get the teak finished.
Is teak really that bad? Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

a
figure
blades,
Never planed it myself, but at a Woodcraft store shop, teak is forbidden in one of the planers because the blades are harder to change. My guess is they have some experience with it. New blades for my planer are $30 a set ($15 per side). Marginal choice. If I had to take a lot off, I'd probably pay. One or two light passes, I'd take the chance. Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Toller wrote:

$40 isn't much of a downpayment on a planer, but it's a nice start on a #7 plane. Look at his as an opportunity. %-) Dave in Fairfax
--
reply-to doesn't work
use:
daveldr at att dot net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've planed and otherwise cut teak. Teak has a high silica content, it's rough on HSS tooling. I don't think you'll need new blades, but you might need to get them sharpened when you're through.
You'll need the planer anyway in the future for other projects.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Toller" writes:

a
blades,
Real teak is an absolute bitch to machine because it is very abrasive and quickly destroys cutting edges.
It will cost you a lot more than $40 to get near my planer with your teak.
Your lumber yard is giving you a deal, IMHO.
If you need a planer, buy one.
If you plan on planing teak with it, buy an extra set of blades.
HTH
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
New blades probably would run you LESS than the $40 they want to charge you for the service. Depending on the price of replacement blades, you do the math
John

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes is it indeed that bad. I have installed teak flooring (several thousand sq feet) with all trims, etc. It is hard, brittle, and some pieces with no rhyme ir reason will tear out like nobody's business. Due to the oiliness, it also has a nasty effect on thickness sanders (especially if you are using a non steraed belt, or one that is worn) as well. The resultant sawdust/planings from sanding and/or planing always make me cough a lot, even when I clean up the shop after working with this wood.
I would take it to the lumber yard, let them plane it, and let them replace anything they screw up. Let them clean up their machines. Let them clean up their shavings and dust. Don't tear up a new planer. This wood is hard enought hat if you hit a hard pocket on the wood with a home shop planer, you will easily put nicks in the thinner blades found on these machines.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes. It has a lot of silica in the wood and dulls blades.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm working up to planing both teak and zebra wood. What experience have you folks had with carbide planer blades? Is it worth it?
RB
Phisherman wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"RB" writes:

I haven't used carbide planer blades because I couldn't justify the investment.
My guess is that unless you have a couple of thousand board feet of teak to plane, it won't be worth it.
Better off buying 2-3 sets of HSS blades and get real friendly with your local sharpening service.
Have no comment on zebrawood.
HTH
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So, Paddy - are you saying this stuff would be good for 'belaying pins' and the line sheaves in rigging blocks?
Regards, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop {Isn't that an 'extreme cure' for bleeding hemorrhoids? Sorry - that's what it FEELS like before you have them taken care of !!}

SNIP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.