Plan and measurments

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^^^^^^^^^^^

Would you mind referring to the *imperial system* - feet and inches aren't unique to the USA. Indeed, you took them across from here with the first english settlers. They are still normal to those of us of my generation here in the UK.
Feet, inches, pounds, gallons, ounces are all "imperial" measure, metres, millimetres, kilogrammes, litres are all "metric"
Until about a year ago I was a fierce defendant of the imperial system but now see some of the advantages of working metric - largely through working with my daughter in her blacksmith's shop.
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Stuart Winsor

For Barn dances and folk evenings in the Coventry and Warwickshire area
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I've done enough with both systems to see advantages and disadvantages to either system. I prefer woodworking with the US system, but precision measurements with tools like a Vernier caliper are easier with metric. I'm not even against mixing systems when the need arises. Did you know that HO scale uses a proportion of ~3.5mm to the 1ft? Purists are screaming, while pragmatists are getting work done. :-)
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

00, more common in the uk, uses 4mm to the foot but neither use a true scale gauge for the track. So much so that a major toy maker in the UK back in the 50s/early 60's used to refer to their stuff as 00/H0
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Stuart Winsor

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It what why all of Europe is built crooked?
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If the civil engineers in Pisa had been using a Lee Valley sliding bevel instead of one from the local Depot della Casa, things would have turned out very differently.
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Han wrote:

Does ANYONE not own _a_ ruler and tape that doesn't have metric markings?
Anyone who has NOTHING with metric units, speak up!
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I have several with out the two markings. Oddly they are kinda hard to find. IIRC FastCap makes a couple now. Working with a Festool Domino which is only metric is a bit tough at times when wanting to cut a mortise in the exact middle of a 3/4" thick piece of wood. Sooo I have been looking tape measures with the dual markings.
My Rules have standard on one side and metric on the other. :~(
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Leon wrote:

Why measure?
Divide, and units become irrelevant.
A combo square used similar to a depth gauge makes a great divider. I do this with my mortiser. Set the square to protrude ~ 1/2 the board thickness. Scribe a line, flip the square to the other side, scribe again. Exactly between those two lines is the center. Use the board to set the tool.
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Yes, I can suck eggs too :-)
For a board thickness I would use my marking gauge in a similar manner to that described. Checking from both sides of the board and adjusting until the scribed marks lie exactly on top of each other.
Just giving an example, perhaps I should have chosen a length such as 5ft 1.15/16. I tend to halve the 5ft, halve the inch and then halve the 16ths so when marking out I eye up the 2'6" mark, move an inch, then the 15/32 and make my mark.
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Stuart Winsor

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Stuart wrote:

You can't divide metric measurements by 2?
1.416 meters...
1416mm/2 = 708mm
The most convoluted metric measure we'd find in woodworking still can be easily stated in millimeters that are easily divided.
It's 10's, just like US money and our hands.
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Err, yes.

I think I have already made that point.
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Stuart Winsor

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Klas from Creum wrote:

I live in Canada, ostensibly a metric country. Despite that, and because of our proximity to the US, most of our lumber at the yard is sized in the old imperial way.
I drive in kilometers per hour, read celcius temps, and buy sliced meat by the gram. I'm used to it.
But reading metric plans and using inch-based lumber would be very difficult. It would add to my errors, and I don't need any help in that department. Converting isn't a difficult process for me, but I think I'd avoid it because I'd end up with a measurement like 3.6984".
My $0.02000000000000
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But surely your Lumber sizes are only nominal anyway? When you want a specific size you plane it yourself to exact size. Like in the UK, if you bought "2x2" planed you got something around 1.3/4"x1.3/4" plus and minus about 1/16". These days its 44mmx44mm and that's the finished size you buy.
Speaking personally, at age 61, I've only just started using metric units for measuring timber as I always used to like imperial measure. However, trying to work out the centre of a piece of timber that is 1.13/16" thick requires more brain exercise, tiresome for my old brain, than halving 50mm.
Why convert - just get a metric rule :-)
Think currency, you guys should be used to working in 10s, here in the UK we used to have to put up with 12 pennies to the shilling and twenty shillings to the pound.
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wrote:

Actually in the US, you can commonly buy rough cut, S2S, and S2S1E/S3S. Surfaced 2 sides and Surfaced 2 sides 1 edge ripped straight. All are commonly nominal and are intended to be resurfaced/planed to the desired normal thickness.
There is also a very common S4S designation for lumber and this lumber is uniform in width and thickness and not normally intended to be resurfaced to aquire the common thickness of 3/4" from 4/4 stock.

Half of 1-13/16" Convert all to the lowest common deniminator, add, then double the common deniminatior. 1" = 16/16" + 13/16" = 29/16". Half of that is 29/32". But I hear you, several years of the old fashoned way of creating mechanical drawings mades one quick with fractions. ;~)
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Stuart wrote:

Yes it is. I didn't mention that because it would add another layer of confusion.
When you want a

You've been more successful with that than I. I tried that a few times, for the same reason, but imperial thinking got in the way and I gave it up. With the work that I do, halving 13/16" normally isn't an issue.

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Tanus

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To add to that confusion, lumber I saw in Holland was sold in metric measurements, but acursory examination clearly showed that the plywood panels etc were 4x8 feet ... Still they measure everything in m and cm.
My 0,02 <grin>.
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Han
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Yup, same here in the UK
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Stuart Winsor

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