Ping Unisaw - Toe'd out tablesaw rip fences

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Sorta true... The kick back is less likely between the blade and the fence but is offset by the waste being fed into the back side of the up spinning blade. Kickback does not require a fence in the equation to happen.
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wrote:

makes
the
wood
Perhaps this got started by instruction manual writers who wanted to be sure owners would err on the safe side when aligning the fence. If a sloppy tuner shoots for dead parallel, there's a 50% chance he's going to create a pinch. The more experienced person would probably decide for himself how to tune his saw anyway.
I'm relatively inexperienced. My fence has the prescribed toe-out, and it will stay that way until I see that it's causing a problem.
Tom
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Tom notes:

It isn't the writer's fault. Check out your manuals. Notice all the skull and crossbone boxes telling you to keep your fingers out of places no sane person would put them anyway. Same with the slight toe-out (when I have to recommend it, I recommend folding a sheet of copy paper and using that as the measuring stick). It is based on legal liabilities in our suit prone society. First we need fewer lawyers. Then we need judges with the guts to toss out the bullshit cases without hearing them. And we need juries, for the stuff that goes to jury trial, that have sense enough to know that idiots should not be rewarded for idiotic behavior.
When all this happens, check out Cloud Nine. It's in Seventh Heaven, where we'll all be.
Charlie Self "To create man was a quaint and original idea, but to add the sheep was tautology." Mark Twain's Notebook http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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What is the personal risk, damage to cut or waste stock, or any other conceivable danger of kicking out the fence a few thou from the heel of the TS blade? I have always done that on my General 350 and no blood yet. Hoyt Weathers
Charlie Self wrote:

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On 01/29/2004 5:54 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com, "Hoyt

There is none, the cutting takes place 90 degrees from the forward dead center of the blade to the fence. That is the critical area.

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in message

I am using 2 different WWII 40 tooth general on a Jet cabinet saw with the fence parallel to the blade. When I have them sharpened I send them to Forrest and have them bring the blade back to factory specs along with resharpening, When ripping perfectly straight stock I get no tooth marks and the results are usually shiney smooth.
If you are getting tooth marks on a perfectly parallel fence one of the following may be the problem. Your stock may not be perfectly straight. If it is not the wood will not feed perfectly straight. You could have a tooth or 2 that is not in perfect alignment with the others. This is why I have Forrest bring the blade back to factory specs with every resharpening. Your saws could have a little too much run out on the arbor.
I would put more thought into whether your blade is at factory specs or if your stock is perfectly straight.

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On Thu, 29 Jan 2004 15:30:19 GMT, "Leon"

I agree that this can cause the problem, but it's not the case here. The locals playing with me agree the wood is straight.

It's a 30 day old WWII. Maybe I'll call Forrest and ask about them looking at it. But the other combos did exhibit similar behavior.

Wouldn't this show up on some of the other blades? We did this on (4) saws, a brand new General 650, a PM66, and two different Jet contractor's saws. The cuts made with the rip blades looked like they were scraped smooth, not a mark to be found.

Thanks! Barry
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in message

"Mouse Nuts" is another reference point I oft hear bantered about. Insect/mammal discussion aside, I'd proffer that the gnat's buttocks be used for measurements in the < 0.010" range. And we leave the genetalia of the Order Rodentia to cover 0.011" to 0.100".
I'm open to more similies for measurements greater than a tenth of an inch.
What do gnats eat?
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On 01/29/2004 10:16 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@armada.sprintco.bbn.net,

An RCH

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No matter, what that gives you is a fence that is NOT parallel to the sawblade.
A better solution would be to put 1/32nd inch UHMW plastic laminate on or something like formica on the front half of the fence and leave the back edge of the fence bare to give the wood a little room as needed
Personally I keep my fence as parallel to the blade as I can John
On Thu, 29 Jan 2004 01:20:57 GMT, B a r r y B u r k e J r .

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When I bought my Unisaw new in 1979, I just wished it had a vertical face on the rip fence! The dirty dog was splayed out top-to-bottom at the operator end. I built my own "T"-Square fence from 2" x 3" rectangular steel tubing and faced it with 3/4" x 5" white ash. I haven't aligned the blade to perfection (it's off probably 0.010 to maybe 0.020 across the diameter -- rough guess without measuring), but it is SWEET! I used polyethylene blocks as sliders for the T-square and it's as smooth as silk. Other than the junk fence that came with it, I LOVE my Unisaw.
Clarke
"B a r r y B u r k e J r ." wrote:

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