performax sander question

Page 2 of 2  
"Leon" wrote in message

Actually, what would you want to bet that is not far from the truth?
Sounds like a good prospective thesis for one of those government funded grants.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/29/06
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

There's a good question for "ACQ Nancy". <G>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dang, you lost me on that one. ACQ?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

She's the sock puppet from a recent thread on cutting pressure treated lumber.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

I guess it all depends on how she holds the sander. <g>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Depends. SWMBO doesn't seem to mind sanding the breadboards with the old Rockwell speed bloc.
She puts the boards in her lap....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah that sander goes way back. I bought my first PC Speed Bloc in 1989 and it pooped out last yrear. I bought another just like it. That sander is a work horse. If you do not see a cloud of dust coming up from it, it needs new paper.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I really do not mind sanding. I used to hate it. Truly having the equipment that gets the job done in a timely manner is key. I do not cut corners on sanders and go with the ones that have stood the test of time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

I should clarify that I don't hate sanding or scraping, as long as the project is a jewelry box or end table. <G>
Lately, most of my work has been large, so even with good equipment and supplies, it seems to go on far too long.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes you have to have it just a hair higher on the outside.When I had mine I just dialed it in and left it like that. It was maybe 1/64th if that. These are great for widths that fit within the the width of the belt. It is really a bit gimmicky to do wider widths. I always hand sanded after for wider widths.
If at all possible I would sand separate panels at the max width, then join them and hand sand out the rest of the way. Now that I have a 24" wide belt I still use this approach. I did a 2" thick butcher block top 3' wide by 5' long. I did a buch of 8-10" wide glue-ups and sanded them down to a standard thickness. Then I joined them into two 18" wides and sanded those in the wide belt, then joined the two pieces and hand sanded.
If I had my choice, I would much rather have a 24" wide drum than an 18/36 open sided. Plus the open sides units are usually 1 1/2 hp and the drums are 4 or 5hp.
BW
brianlanning wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have never been able to get it perfectly parallel. So I make sure the error is to having the outside a bit higher. Not a serious problem; you just have to be sure not to sand something on the extreme outside, lower the drum and then sand on the inside, because it is too much.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I have a 22/44 and the crown is very very small, and you just touch it up with a RO sander. Nothing to be concerned about.
Gary
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I'm not so much worried about the crown as I am the groove they talked about. If you can adjust the open end so that it's 1/64" or even 1/32" higher, then leave it there forever. That would probably be fine. Chances are, I would never notice since it's the wide boards that would tend to have this much error in thickness rather than places where you're joining like table aprons or legs.
I just want to avoid having to ever adjust this setting much. To me, having to do that would be like having to adjust your jointer knives between every board.
My main goal for a drum sander is to reduce the amount of sanding time I have. If I have to spend 15 minutes sanding a table top with the ROS, that's not a big deal. If this machine saves me an hour on sanding the top, I think it's worth it. Chances are, it would do a better job sanding than I would.
Has anyone ever upgraded the motor on a 22/44? I'm not sure if I would even need more than the 1.5.
brian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leave the "outside" dimension slightly higher(very slightly) than the inside. You will never notice the difference unless you carefully use a micrometer to measure the center differential. Using this method does indeed eliminate any chance of a sanding "ridge" in the center.
I have been using a 22/24 on a RAS for about 20-22 years. I now own a 16/32 stand-alone and have not re-adjusted it since the original install 3 years ago. Enough said. Enjoy, the Performax is a great tool.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
brianlanning wrote:

It isn't really a groove, it is an unsanded area. If you are sanding something 24" wide on a 16" machine that means 8" is unsanded on the first pass. When you flip it for pass #2, you will get an unsanded area again *IF* the drum is not dead level or is too low on the outboard end. _____________

You can but those dimensions are way too much. It would take bloody forever to sand out on a panel of any size.
You want to set it as close to level as possible, just a *tiny* bit higher outboard. Easy way to check is with something flat, smooth and at least 16" wide - draw diagonal pencil marks across it and sand so you are barely sanding...lets you see how much is being taken off each side and you can adust the drum accordingly. When you can just barely remove the pencil from the inboard side and almost from the outboard you have it about right.
BTW, when sanding stuff materially wider than the drum it is a good idea to support what is hanging out the end. Additionally, you can apply up/down pressure as needed on what's hanging out should the drum be out of whack.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dadiOH wrote:

OK, now I've seen posts suggesting, as above, to set the outboard end higher, presumably to allow for sag. There have also been posts suggesting that the outboard end should be set lower to combat flex.
Either the opposing posters have different sanders, or the rest of us haven't a clue which is right.
I may have missed it, but has anyone quoted what Performax says? I don't own one but our store does sell them so I'd like to know what to tell the customers.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You may find this useful - I did.
http://www.joewoodworker.com/performax.htm
When you initially align the sander, do it without any sandpaper installed on either the drum or the table. You will need a good reference that has parallel edges to get the setup done right - I used a 24" aluminum straight edge from Lee Valley that I have. The tips about removing the spring and making that mod really works - try it.
Bob S.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don't find them for sale used! I think that speaks for itself. Doesn't it? I am looking for one and was trying for used, but no luck.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.