paint application AND temperature

I really want to paint my garage workshop BUT the temp is only 5 Celcius. The paint requires a minimum of 10 Celcius. I have tried heating the garage up to temp BUT there is just no insualtion in the roof and you know about those garage doors. SO, my question:
Do I risk some pricey paint by applying it at 5 Celcius? What is going to happen to it if I do? If the cure times are altered, I am OK with that. I have nothing but time because my wood glue does not work so well at 5 Celcius.
Thanks for the help.
Brandt
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Brant -- were are you located ? In the States, Sherwin Williams sells a paint called "Duration" that will go on down to 35F might be you want to look at different paint. I've had the paint on my house for about year and it looks great
Cheers

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Easy answer. Wait until spring
At the minimum the cure time will be extended. It may not flow as well when you apply it at lower temperatures giving a poor finish. I surely would try it in a small area to see what happens. .
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On 9 Dec 2004 17:11:04 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@telus.net (brandt) wrote:

It seems that nothing works for you at 5 Celcius. So ....wait.
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brandt wrote:

I painted my garage door last month and here it was right on the line; 10 degress max during the day, low lower at night. I probably applied one coat below the line. Observations: - On the coldest day, the paint flowed very poorly and was quite hard to apply even remotely evenly. - Cure times were *much* longer them I am used to with Latex. - Overall, it was a pretty big hassle and not the smoothest of results
For me, sealing the door and stabilizing were the primary concern with appearance being secondary, although the door looks just fine at casual glance or more then 3m away. So, for me, I consider it a success. I would say if you are just doing it for looks, wait. If it has a function, do it; it is only paint and can always be redone.
PK
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The surfactants in the paint can "glob" together and move to the surface of the paint film. This will diminish the durability of the paint. It can also cause streaking if the paint gets wet.
Roger

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The cured results may look strange. I painted the outside of my house a few years ago and the nights dropped down into the lo 40's F. 2 days after painting, the paint surface developed a white chalky layer. This was explained to me as normal when the temp drops below a certain point. The solution to get rid of the chalky haze was to either wash it off or let the rain eventually wash it off. I chose the latter and 4 weeks later the surface looked normal. If you are painting inside and washing off the surface will be a problem or impossible I would advise you to wait for warmer conditions. I was using a latex paint. Remember, the temperature must be correct during cure time also.
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