OT---The media

Page 1 of 2  
And you wonder how things get misconstrued and blown out of proportion when listening to the media.
By Business Insider, Colin Campbell
Both of former President George W. Bush's daughters aren't following the family's Republican Party heritage.
Jenna Bush Hager, the younger of the Bush twins, bla bla bla.
Now I ask does, any one really care or need clarification as to which twin popped out first? Does it matter? One would assume that the name of the daughter might be enough information to distinguish between the two. Does anyone need further clarification, really?
Another case of putting too much impertinent information into the story to fill space.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The general quality of journalism has dropped significantly from the time I was a reporter for a midwest daily in the late 60s and early 70s. Part of that can be attributed to the paring of the older, more experienced (and h igher paid) reporters and editors to align costs with declining revenues in the print world. Part of it is the generally lousy job colleges and unive rsities do in teaching the craft. The example you posted is just incompete nt editing. More egregious examples are easy to find on every medium in ev ery market. The worst offenders, IMHO, are the large cable news channels. I've started tuning to BBC America and PBS for decent, competent reporting .
Larry
On Thursday, September 4, 2014 1:27:55 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/4/2014 1:51 PM, Gramps' shop wrote:

Been watching OANN lately. Not long enough to make up my mind, but so far, so good. Even better that it is being reviled by the likes of the Daily KOokS, so it must be hitting a nerve.
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/4/2014 2:51 PM, Gramps' shop wrote:

While there may be some items that have affected media circulation, I believe one of the greatest causes for the decline of the traditional media is the extreme bias in some organizations.
There are entirely too many stories that are like the old one about the two horse race between the US and the USSR. "The day after the race the media reported the the US horse came in next to last, and the USSR horse came in second."
I believe the US population is tired of this type of reporting and have given up on traditional media as a source of their news.
I know in our family, we have stopped taking the newspaper because of the extreme bias expressed on every issue.
We still watch the TV news for the entertainment value like one reporter who was interviewing the person in charge of an operation that produced a caustic byproduct. When the person in charge told the report that the by product was like Draino she responded by asking if his staff was trained to handle Draino. I will bet she did not know what Draino was.
With "Intelligent" reporters like this who needs Bill Cosby.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/4/2014 2:59 PM, knuttle wrote:

I can't not mention the local Channel 2 anchor. She is there because she is pretty. Fresh out of college 20+ years ago as their traffic girl and straight to the anchor desk.
Anyway she reported an airplane incident. The airplane skidded into a crash. There was no mention of the crash that the airplane skidded in to... ;~)
And my latest favorite, The car over turned. We all understand that the car turned over but that is not proper English, ending the sentence with a preposition. Well maybe it is an adverb and could be turned over......
So what the heck is overturned???? Was the steering wheel turned too much? Is that like over steer?
Maybe they should think a little harder and tell us what really happened. The car ended up in an inverted position or the car was up side down as a result of the accident.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Leon" wrote in message
I can't not mention the local Channel 2 anchor. She is there because she is pretty. Fresh out of college 20+ years ago as their traffic girl and straight to the anchor desk.
HEY! WATCH YOUR MOUTH! You leave Dominique alone!
News, huh. that's what she does?
http://dominiquesachse.tv/
Dave in Houston
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/4/2014 9:49 PM, Dave in Texas wrote:

;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Dave in Texas" wrote in message
I can't not mention the local Channel 2 anchor. She is there because she is pretty. Fresh out of college 20+ years ago as their traffic girl and straight to the anchor desk.
HEY! WATCH YOUR MOUTH! You leave Dominique alone!
News, huh. that's what she does?
http://dominiquesachse.tv/
"I just have to look good, I don't have to be clear Let me whisper in your ear, give us dirty laundry."
[With apologies to Don Henley]
Dave in Houston
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/4/2014 11:51 AM, Gramps' shop wrote:

Larry's point is well taken. However, the major problem is that what passes for news these days is slanted, if not a subject of prevarication and omission. Cable news outlets do this purposefully in order to keep their listeners in line and the money flowing. For example, consider the Affordable Care Act. Obamacare? Fair enough. Is it a godsend? Is it expensive? Is it horribly expensive? Will it bring the nation to its knees? This kind of rhetoric is not good for our country.
If you want to know the state of your various worlds, stick with the BBC (World and American Service), the PBS Newshour, and Al Jazeera (American service). PBS is carried on your local PBS station. The BBC can be found again on PBS or on the web. Al Jazeera has its own cable channel (used to be the Current news channel). They all have web sites for print and broadcast media.
Good stuff is out there for you. Here's a test of your political leanings: If you think that FOX or MSNBC is spot on, just go away and don't bother anyone. If you think that they are excessive, continue to CNN. If you find them to be a bit to the right of center or at least comfortable, you can easily switch to any of the above outlets. Otherwise, sit down and start recording/watching Jon Stewart and Steven Colbert until you feel you are ready to reenter polite society.
Don't take any of this too seriously. I already get the occasional nasty-gram for voicing my views. Good night and good luck.     mahalo,     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

"overturn" is a verb, and it's in all my dictionaries (electronic and dead-tree). Ending the sentence with the past-tense of a verb is perfectly proper when you're making a statement that something happened in the past.
The tree fell.
The dog barked.
The car overturned.
If you prefer passive voice:
The car was overturned.

It's a verb. In your example it's past tense [but you misspelled it by inserting a space in the middle].

Here's what Wictionary says:
Etymology
From Middle English overturnen, equivalent to over- +‎ turn. Compare also Middle English overterven (“to overturn”), see terve. Verb
overturn (third-person singular simple present overturns, present participle overturning, simple past and past participle overturned)
1. To turn over, capsize or upset (something) 2. To overthrow or destroy something 3. (law) To reverse a decision; to overrule or rescind 4. To diminish the significance of a previous defeat by winning; to comeback from.

No, it means the car was turned upside-down. The roof was on the ground and the wheels were on top.

I don't understand what your complaint is.
--
Grant Edwards grant.b.edwards Yow! ... I want a COLOR
at T.V. and a VIBRATING BED!!!
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/4/2014 4:40 PM, Grant Edwards wrote:

But did the car overturn or did the drive overturn? Is that what caused the car to turn over, the steering being overturned?

So why not just say something turned over as the #1 definition states? Or is the definition poor English?

Yeah, but your sentence, the car was turned upside-down, ends in a preposition, down is a location. That is supposedly a no no, do not end a sentence with a preposition.
FWIW my dictionary indicates over to an adverb also, modifys the verb, turned

The reporters are trying to make the last words in a sentence "turned over" grammatically correct as easily as possible, by reversing the two words, and making the matter confusing.
Oddly they continue to say that the pedestrian was run over, why don't they say the pedestrian was over run.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dunno, but my stomach may overturn...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Ships do come about don't they?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/4/2014 5:12 PM, snipped-for-privacy@wind.net wrote:

;~) I believe that would be correct, since the sentence did not end with about. I'm obviously no English guru. ;~)
The media would probably change that to, ships do just about over come don't they?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/4/2014 3:12 PM, snipped-for-privacy@wind.net wrote:

That is a proposition up with which I will not put! [Attributed to W. Churchill]     mahalo,     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Probably so. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 04 Sep 2014 14:18:05 -0500, Swingman wrote:

BBC and PBS seem a lot closer to the ideal of reporting the news, instead of editorializing, than any of the commercial "news" broadcasts.

OANN? Those are the folks that think Fox news is too liberal :-).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/4/2014 6:45 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

The political talk shows, yes.
The NEWS segments, not at all ... and much more balanced than CNN, Fox, MSNBC, etal.
You'd have to actually watch it to realize that.
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The word "overturned" is well understood. It is a verb with the subject being "car". A car is not a wheel, so there is no confusion. It does not mean the same thing as "over-steered".
Well, it wasn't supposed to be turned on that axis, at all, so if it's shiny-side down, I suppose it was "over turned". ;-)

Like many verbs, it's precise meaning depends greatly on the subject. Would you limit the language to only one way of saying something? Are you French?

Only in some quarters. Others have no problems with sentences ending such.

"Overturned" is one word. It the verb of the sentence.

The words weren't reversed. "Overturned" is one word.

Different word. "Overrun" is a big mistake for an airplane or something ISIS did in I.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/4/2014 7:22 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

The deal is that 5~6 years ago it was always turned over, then one changed and they all played me too. No one has any doubt what turned over means. When you hear them reading of the teleprompter, one cannot distinguish overturned from over turned.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.