OT: Okra question. Swingman?

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When cleaning okra for a gumbo, does one leave that little hat on?
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On 2/28/2010 3:58 PM, Robatoy wrote:

Yes ... all you have to do to clean okra is rinse it off. The smaller the okra, the more tender it will be and the less time it will take to cook.
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The little ones I have always left whole. It's more the bigger ones I was talking about. Those bigger little hats tend to get a bit woody. Other than that, I love okra.... in a weird snotty kinda way. <G>
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On 02/28/2010 03:58 PM, Robatoy wrote:

If the okra is small and tender, I leave the caps on and pick off the spines(if it has any, most store bought doesn't), if the okra is larger, I'll cut it up in chunks and discard the caps.
Off to the freezer to get some okra to thaw. :)
basilisk
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On 2/28/2010 5:19 PM, basilisk wrote:

My mother always discarded the caps--I never felt any urge to eat them myself. They tend to be tough.
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wrote:

I never felt the urge to eat any other part of it either...
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On Sun, 28 Feb 2010 16:19:47 -0600, the infamous basilisk

I once bought a 6-pack of tomato plants. A short while later, 4 of them had green balls and two had green sticks on 'em. I was astonished when I finally got to pick the ripe okra from the two, as the plants and leaves looked identical sitting right next to the tomatoes.
I hadn't eaten okra since I lived in Arkansas, so it was a treat to have it fresh. I never did like the cardboardy caps, though, even on small, young okra. And the tips could be that way, too, so I always cut both ends off, as I do with green beans.
I remember watching Justin Wilson (The Cajun Chef on PBS eons ago) tell me to do the same thing to okra that I was doing. I buy frozen okra and put it in large pots of stewp I make. (Right, "stewp". It's too thick for soup and too thin for stew.)
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On 2/28/2010 8:28 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

If selected correctly, and fully cooked, the entire okra will be tender with most any cooking methods ... in a gumbo, it will mostly disappear before the pot is finished.
Me, I just do the EZ way, nightly, in season ... microwave in a covered pyrex dish for about 5 - 6 minutes, with a pat of butter and Tony Chachere's to taste.
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On 02/28/2010 09:12 PM, Swingman wrote:

I roast okra too, only I coat it in olive oil, salt and pepper. in the oven at 400 for about 30 minutes. Concentrates the flavor and not near as slick as boiled.
Thanks to Robatoy, I just finished some along with a pork steak and cooked down and fried squash.
basilsik
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On 2/28/2010 9:20 PM, basilisk wrote:

Probably have averaged eating okra half a dozen times a month for the better part of 60 years, particularly since it's been available frozen for the last 30 years or so, and before that we either froze it ourselves, or pickled it.
Being the cook in the family, I put it most of the weekly soups, and you can't say "gumbo" without the Trinity - chicken, sausage, okra - in S Louisiana where I come from, and I LOVE pickled okra!!
We grew it every summer on the farm as a kid ... anyone whose every picked okra on a sweltering hot day will know what a rash you can get from the leaves hitting a sweaty body when you're picking it.
I even took some okra seeds to England many years ago and actually got a couple of plants to bear one summer, although not enough for a gumbo. :)
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On 02/28/2010 09:34 PM, Swingman wrote:

I raise most of the okra we eat and probably froze 40 lbs last year, but it is almost gone. Most people don't know what the food they eat is supposed to taste like, I will not eat a store bought egg, they are bland and tasteless same as most of the store bought veggies.
basilisk
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On 2/28/2010 9:47 PM, basilisk wrote:

You can take the boy out of the country ....I've grown okra and tomatoes on the front porch in the midst of this urban jungle. :)
And just finished this "urban chicken coop" a couple of weeks back:
http://picasaweb.google.com/karlcaillouet/ChezPoulet #
Actually, the coop was for my partner in Austin ... they can have chickens in the city limits there, but before she moved to Austin we had fresh eggs from her hens weekly for the past fifteen years. Since I finished my last house in Austin a couple of months ago, I've been reduced to store bought brown eggs lately.
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On 02/28/2010 10:00 PM, Swingman wrote:

That's a nice looking coop, most of my chickens free range but I've got a couple of portable coops I use sometimes, they look more like something extracted from a shanty town.
basilsik
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On 2/28/2010 10:06 PM, basilisk wrote:

This coop style is big in Europe and Britain ... they call the style an "Ark", and, depending upon size, they will hold 4 to 6 hens for the backyard chicken raiser ... perfect for urban use and they are growing in popularity here in the US.
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On Sun, 28 Feb 2010 22:00:27 -0600, the infamous Swingman

Not bad. What does the beastie weigh?

I got some green (she called them blue) veggie-fed eggs from a client last month, and some fresh leeks, leaf parsley, potatoes, and carrots. I made a nice bit of leek soup. Yum! Anywho, her eggs didn't taste much different (or better than) the Fred Meyer eggs I usually buy.
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scrawled the following:

I give away about 6 times as many eggs as we can eat, I can be real picky about what I keep to eat. The best eggs are from first year layers that are completly free range, I only feed the chickens enough so that they will have a sense of where home is.
This may gross out a lot of people but won't surprise anyone that grew up on a farm, the chickens literally follow the horses and goats around cleaning up behind them, I haven't had to muck a stall out in ages. saves a lot of time and effort.
basilisk
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On Tue, 2 Mar 2010 06:42:07 -0600, the infamous "basilisk"

How long do you store eggs? I'm amazed at the short time they're considered good any more. Historically, eggs could be stored (cool) for years.

Parents of teens could learn from this.

I thought they only ate the bugs and flies which came for the poo.
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"Larry Jaques" wrote:

------------------------------------ When a chicken lays an egg, the shell is sealed by a coating similar to cooking oil.
During the cleaning and candling process this coating gets removed thus removing the natural protection of the shell.
Common trick for sailors, including myself, is to buy eggs from the farm if possible, then coat shells with cooking oil and store onboard in a cool place, turning eggs end for end every 2-3 days.
Have kept eggs this way for about 6 weeks with no problems.
Probably could have kept them longer, but the cruise was over.
Lew
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scrawled the following:

If you don't wash the eggs they will keep a very long time, I know I have kept eggs for 2 months but they would probably keep longer. Usually if I have any that make it to three weeks or more I feed them to the dogs.
Eggs are sterile when the are laid(at least on the inside) and if they are not damaged or washed, will simply eventually dry out on the inside without ever rottening.

Chickens can and do eat anything, I had a couple of 4x8 sheets of blue foam board stored at the barn and the next time I saw them the only thing left was the thin plastic skin that is on either side. So much for organic farm raised eggs and chickens.

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On Wed, 3 Mar 2010 06:43:18 -0600, the infamous "basilisk"

OK.
Interesting. That's fertilized eggs which were allowed to get cool, right?

I'm surprised you guys didn't get sick from the styrene in the foam. The blueboard is true styrofoam.
-- An author spends months writing a book, and maybe puts his heart's blood into it, and then it lies about unread till the reader has nothing else in the world to do. -- W. Somerset Maugham, The Razor's Edge, 1943
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