OT bad experience today

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Mike Marlow:

The wounds from jamming your fist in his mouth will be trivial to the pain from him closing his jaws on some fleshier part of your anatomy. A dog can easily bite all the way through your hand and dog bites hurt like a son of a bitch.
--
Mac Cool

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Again - look at the size of your hand, and then look at most large dogs the next time you get the chance. My thoughts are that you'll never be able to do it. I believe this suggestion is one of those that originated in the mind of someone who has never tried it, more than one that is based on practical knowledge. I have a 100lb plus German Shepherd and I'd personally give anyone $100 if they could jam their fist into his throat. Even if it were possible, I'd pay another hundred to watch the show as that fool tried to keep his hand in there and subdue the dog until he passed out. Hospital bills are the responsibility of the fool that thinks this is going to work and tries it.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
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Mac Cool wrote:

It's all about buying time. I've never had to do it myself and I don't know anyone who has, but I saw a disturbing video produced by the Russian military successfully demonstrating the same technique with a large and aggressive dog. The idea is to trigger the dog's gag reflex, which will cause him to temporarily lose focus of his attack. If you have ever seen a dog try to dislodge something from his throat, you can probably form a good idea of the mechanics at work. To survive an attack from a dog trained to kill or injure people, you must disable the animal's ability to mount an attack, and to do that, you need time to smash a foot or dislocate one of his legs. If you try to kick the dog, you could lose your balance and fall, placing you at an even greater disadvantage. When I was a kid, I learned that most (pet) dogs would break off an attack if I threw a rock at them. Sometimes the act of bending over to pick up a rock was enough of a deterrent.
-- -linux_lad To verify that this post isn't forged, click here: http://www.spoofproof.org/verify.php?sig {3adeb2edc18258be9d676559acf7af
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John Keeney did say:

As a cyclist, my preferred method of dealing with aggressive dogs is to pedal a little harder and outrun them. If unable to do that due to terrain, tired legs or laziness, I just pull out my water bottle and give 'em a little squirt in the face. Even the most aggressive mutt is immediately put off by the surprise stream of liquid into their face. It's worked on dogs of all sizes and breeds. There's a big, ugly mixed breed that I've done that to three times lately, and I think he's starting to get used to it. This weekend, I think there'll be some pepper sauce in the bottle.
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Just don't forget, unless you're a chilihead. Might wreck the bottle as well...
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a trick that motorcyclists use is to slow down a little. the dog will time and aim their approach at your slow speed. when they're fairly close, speed up then. the dog won't be able to adjust in time.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.stratus.com says...

As a motorcyclist off and on for fifty years, I'd say you left out a step.
When the dog approaches, brake sharply to get behind him. THEN speed up, planting a large boot on his butt. I've never had to do it twice.
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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Larry Blanchard did say:

On a bicycle, with my shoes clipped into the pedals, doing that would require more dexterity than I can muster.
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When I lived in suburbia I used to run Polly, my Borzoi, right along with me. She loved the exercise, and other dogs seemed to have business elsewhere when she went by.

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George did say:

Niles, my Great Dane, would be an outstanding deterrent. Unfortunately, he thinks running along side my bike is only slightly more stupid than riding it. Walks are great; running is for other dogs.
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says...

That's what the pump is for. Works just as good as a boot.
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Lobby Dosser did say:

Alas, I have one of the little CO2 cartridges. Not nearly as intimidating.
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Pepper spray or a squirt bottle with ammonia solution are good dog deterrents for bicyclists.
--RC
WoodMangler wrote:

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Charles Spitzer did say:

Might work - If it's a slow dog, and my legs are having a really good day...
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I was faced with that once -- unable to speed up fast enough to outrun the dog. I'm sure my top speed was higher than his, but he had superior acceleration, and I could see he would catch me. Fortunately, there was a car coming. I waited until it was almost too late, then crossed the road in front of the car. The dog had two options: abandon the chase, or be hit by the car. It selected the former. The driver of the car was none too happy with me, but that was, at the moment, not very high on my list of concerns. :-)
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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Ratties and the other terrier breeds were designed to go after rats and other vermin; Rotties and Dobes were designed for the two legged varieties. Slight difference in scale but both are fully capable of nailing you.
My grandkids all learned the same lesson -- don't poke the dog. BTW, dog also trained not to bite, so the sequence is funny: poke, poke, poke, warning, poke, growl, warning, poke, snap!lick! Dog's expression comes out as "Honestly, boss! I was licking and his/her fingers snagged on my teeth!" All the kids treat dogs with respect and know the warning signs for an unfriendly dog.
Ontario is making the big step and proposing what British Common Law has always said -- the owner of a dog is financially responsible for what the dog does, unless the victim of the dog attack is doing something he shouldn't like B&E or trespassing. That and bringing in a off-property-muzzle-law for the assault breeds.
My $0.02Cdn....
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(snip story of dog endangering people)

Over in misc.rural, I've seen the "3 S's" - Shoot, Shovel, and Shut up. If the dog goes after my kid, the dog will be dead, and the backhoe will make noise for a minute or three.
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Dave Hinz wrote:

True in a lot of places. Arizona is an interesting state because it consists of urban islands isolated by miles and miles of desert, rangeland, etc. In the urbanized areas you call animal control when you encounter a dog running loose. In the un-urbanized, mostly uninhabited areas, the rule is more direct. Free roaming dogs are likely to be shot on sight.
In neither case are dogs running loose tolerated. Nor should they be.
--RC
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not really, otherwise we'd likely have no coyotes left.

regards, charlie cave creek, az
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Charles Spitzer wrote:

My friend, you underestimate the coyote! First, you're unlikely to see them. Second, they are very prolific animals.
In days gone by people not only shot coyotes on sight, they killed the litters in the dens, lured them into range with varmint calls (and 'range' was likely to be 200 yards or more!), poisoned them, trapped them and hunted them.
Killed a lot of coyotes, but the coyotes kept bouncing back.
They're not my favorite animals, but it's hard not admire them in a sneaky sort of way.
(And did I mention they are a major killer of free-roaming dogs?)
--RC

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