Opinions on PC cordless tools?

I'm making a serious effort this year to go cordless wherever possible, and I'm looking at the Porter Cable cordless series (DeWalt may be at every discount place but they burned me once and I won't buy them again...). Has anyone used the 9290 router? That's one of the more intriguing items for me since I need to replace an ancient router that's gotten to be too hard to deal with. Also looking at the 9845 circular saw, and the BN200V12 brad nailer.
Any suggestions as to alternatives would be accepted, and especially opinions from anyone who's used the PC line.
Thanks,
Jeff
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I have one ... so rarely used that it might be for sale. ;>)
I bought it when I moved to my new location a couple of years ago, had no electricity for the first few months, and didn't want to go without a router for stuff I couldn't do easily by hand.
Have barely used it since the contractor's pole was put in and I could finally wire the shop. IMO, it is simply NOT that _great_ of an idea in practice, although it served its purpose and does a good job.
I used it quite a bit with a Leigh Dovetail jig and just left it set up for that most of the time. I'll be glad to answer any questions you have about it.
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My worry is power more than anything, I have a 3/4 HP router that's my main use router, and it's light but it lacks power sometimes. My second choice after the cordless would be the 693, I could use the plunge base as well. My 1 3/4 HP router that's a pain to use would be replaced by either the cordless or the 693.
Jeff
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wrote:

I'm doing just the opposite (of the current trend). When the batteries go dead, I buy a corded model. I'm sick and tired of recharging expensive batteries when I'm in the middle of a project. I just love my Milwaulkee corded drill which costs the same as a quality cordless drill. It has never gone dead (and I don't need to think about it losing power). It was smart to put in all those electrical receptacles when I set up shop years ago.
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My problem is a lot of work done where cords can be an issue or where power is not easily available. It's especially true of the circular saw, I'm tired of cutting roof sheathing with a cord tangled around my feet. :)
But I sympathise with the batteries, I have extras charging all the time for my drill.
Jeff
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snip > My problem is a lot of work done where cords can be an issue or where

I wouldn't plan on cutting too much roof sheathing with a cordless. They're nice for some things, but aren't meant to do severe duty.
When on a job, we always had drill/drivers and usually cordless recipro saws and circular saws as well. We did new construction and remodeling. We used the drills the most, then the sawzalls, then circular saws. Although we probably used the flashlights in the kits more than the circular saws.

The sawzalls and circular saws both EAT batteries, so always keep one hot. We usually started out by plugging in the charger first thing on site.
Festus
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wrote:

A great market for a 31cc weed whacker motor powered circular saw!
Barry
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I split the difference.
Routers, saws, sanders, etc... aren't that big of a deal to plug in, since in many cases, I still plug in a shop-vac or DC hose.
Drills and drivers, on the other hand, get used for so many "one-off" uses, a cordless really makes sense to me.
Barry
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"Jeff Cochran" writes:

I go cordless whenever possible cuz cords and hoses are always getting tangled at the most inconvenient time, like every time I turn around <G>.
Have some 6-7 year old 18 VDC DeWalt stuff that doesn't owe me any money.
I have absolutely no experience with PC cordless equipment, but I have an uneasy feeling in my gut the new stuff has been "improved" to satisfy the bottom line of the bean counters, not necessarily the market place.
Have you looked at Bosch?
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Lew

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Can't say anything about the router,but I have the 12 volt brad nailer and LOVE IT! I digress. I felt like the Makita 12 volt drill should have lasted more than a year so when I went to replace it I looked at a lot of drill. P,C, had just introduced their 12 volt nailer and I thought it was slick as I had no permanent power to the shop for a compressor. Eventually the price on the nailers came down and I got one for $180.00.I justified the price because of the battery and the charger being used with the 12 volt drill flashlight combo. I wish they had a 15 or 16 gauge nailer but after writing them they said no plans were in the offing. I was told by a guy at woodcraft the 12 volt brad could be used to power a finish nailer.
As far as your plan goes good in theory but the nailer is 12 volt,the router you are looking for I think is 18 and I wouldn't bother with a circular saw smaller than 18 volt but that's just an opinion. One more thing,pick up a power inverter so you can charge the batts off your vehicle rather than mobile chargers. It's cheaper that way.For $30.00 you can get an inverter that will run two chargers at the same time.

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Jeff Cochran wrote:

I've had a 14.4 volt PC cordless drill for several years. It's stood up through a lot of hard use and has plenty of power. On the down side, it's heavy and the keyless chuck doesn't grip round drill bits all that well (it works fine with hex shank screwdriver bits).
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Steve

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Not a big fan of cordless, apropos of some of the comments here. But I am a big fan of PC. Their service centers are also very competent and professional. You can/should repair PC tools, if you beat the crap out of them like most people do. It's doubtful if DeWalt (the new dewalt) are worth fixing, and they definitely can't withstand the use/abuse that PCs can. Sometimes the urge to use cordless can be reduced if you make provisions for drop cords, rather than standard outlets. You can buy/make retracting drop cords, as well. Of course, fieldwork can change the picture, but you must need one helluva battery for a decent sized router or circ saw. -- ---------------------------- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll

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