OK, wreckers. It's 'fess up time!

Page 12 of 16  
Glenna Rose wrote:

I'm still holding out for those little 1" lucite cubes that are supposed to hold 50 TB of data. Why aren't they here yet?
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 23:57:45 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@pmug.org (Glenna Rose) wrote:

a flip up lid $30. I was making them out of oak with roll tops and selling them for just a bit more to friends in the computer club. I still have my pine prototype roll top and use it everyday. The roll top was made with a chunk of my wife's old blue jeans and 1/8 paneling. It was one of my first ever wood working projects. I'll post a picture in the binary group so youse can all have a good laugh.
Do I get a prize for bringing the thread back on topic.<g>

I probably have every floppy I ever made from the early 80s.

I'm way a head of you. It's that or get buried.
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There's a company online that sells "obsolete media". Google for them, they might be interested in giving you more than nothing for them. If you can't find the link, let me know and I'll find it.

Well, they're mylar and iron oxide, so it's not like they're all _that_ nasty, but of course, I understand.
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snipped-for-privacy@bulltopworks.ca writes:

Seems that is in the neighborhood of what I paid for my 10-MB external drive for my Epson QX-10 (CPM, much better than DOS, had the opportunity to compare). Like yours, it was heaven. (1984, 85?)

Understood. I still have both of my original QX-10 machines. But then I also have all of the DOS and later Windows machines I bought in addition to my Macs. I don't even want to think of how many computers are in this house/basement/garage! Must remember, however, computers were the base of my secretarial/bookkeeping service bureau, and I had to buy newer/better to keep current. Now, my computers are mostly just for fun. :-) (It is nice to choose when to buy new rather than be "forced" into it by market.) Though what started out as fun has helped me immensely at work. No kidding, I designed my granddaughter's bedside table on InDesign, not even that kind of program, it's a page layout program (publishing, newspapers, magazines). Like a hammer and saw, it all depends on the user what can be created, inventive can result in some unusual results. Note: I *do not* recommend using what is a intricate word processing program for furniture design! I did it more for the challenge than for practical use; but I don't have any type of drafting program, and it worked.<g>

LOL. Methinks the diehard Mac users have something to be satisfied with; like any, it's how it's used that matters. I made the switch in 2000 for iMovie because of my interest in Video. I taught DOS and Windows (all flavors)through my business, two school districts' community ed programs, then at Computer City at Jantzen Beach in Portland until they went bye-bye. Now it's only an occasional Mac class at PMUG (taught one last night) and was college dean for a year or so (that one is volunteer!) until I went to work where I am now. I could not list all of the programs I've taught and even fewer of all that I've used; no one would believe it anyway. My eldest son has even more but started later than me, and hates Windows (refers all Windows requests to other consultants). Each O/S has its place and its champions.
What CAD programs do you use on your Mac?

My G-4 (this one) has been on my desk since August 2004. On it, I've learned iMovie (simple), FinalCut Pro, FileMaker Pro, PhotoShop, InDesign (preceded by FrameMaker and Quark), QuickBooks, and on and on and on.<g> Versatility can be both a blessing and a curse. It's like hobbies, what takes priority, the shop, the garden, the yard, the sewing machine, what?

LOL, I won't tell. I know folks that run emulators so they can use their Macs for business-specific programs (inspectors, florists, etc.) that are part of a corporation environment.

They both have their place. Both my desktop PC and Mac (OS 9 and X) are on their respective desks and powered up most of the time. The laptop (which has Panther installed, previously Jaguar) doesn't get as much use since I have Panther at work. *And* I'm spoiled at work with dual monitors!!!
Windows 3.1 for Workgroups is what I went back to on my PC as it is so much more stable than all the others. I didn't even take 98 out of the box and wasn't interested in the others after I explored them. It does what I need there, *and* I have my Mac for the "fancy" stuff. :-)
All of them have served me well.

Enjoy.
BTW, are you aware of any low-end drafting type programs to be used for simple projects for the Mac? (Middle son, P.E., is a mite busy with work, family and church so not much time to draw for me, and I like to do stuff myself anyway, maybe let him refine it.)
Glenna
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snipped-for-privacy@pmug.org (Glenna Rose) wrote:

Hello Glenna... *waves*
Microspot MacDraft PE 5.5 Quartz Edition hands down. http://www.microspot.com/products/macdraftPE.htm
You'll find the environment instantly familiar from the MacDraw days. (MacPaint even..lol) Microspot has never taken the eye off the ball when it came to CAD on the Mac. US$ 116.00 that's for the download version. For the same price, Microspot Interiors for OSX is a lot of fun. Download a demo?
I use Vectorworks 10 by Nemetschek. http://www.nemetschek.net / I have been with them since it was designed for a mini computer (You know, the ones the size of a washer dryer) and called MiniCAD. I still have the MiniCAD 1 manuals. *S*
When loyal MiniCAD users were constantly complaining that the name MiniCAD gave the wrong impression of its capabilities, they finally broke down when OS X was on the horizon and called it Vectoworks.
Daniel Libeskind won the World Trade Center Design Study competition in New York City..The Freedom Tower.. another happy Vectorworks user. *VBS*
It's everything anybody could want in a CAD program. AutoCAD has nothing better to offer (for me) and I say this with confidence, because I took AutoCAD for 3 years at the local college and have my 3D-modelling diploma from them. I did that because most industry around here is all AutoCAD.
Vectorworks supports .dwg file formats flawlessly, it is not an issue. VectorWorks is my program of choice because of its versatility and comprehensiveness. Another important factor is that it has been around for a long time with a refined interface and good support. It is also a lot of bang for the buck..... even though it is US 1345.00.. that is with Renderworks included. ( I have a LOT more invested if you add up about 10 major upgrades over the last 15 years... hence.. the Mac. Vectorworks is available for Windows, and people are happy with that.
I am hearing a lot about SketchUp for Mac OSX. I have a demo of it, but I have yet to take the time to look at it. That's under US$ 500.00
..shit...look at the time....
gone
Rob
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snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net writes:

If I hadn't returned it, you could have mine. Everyone raved about them so I bought one, just too entrenched in my hand/finger movements to adapt to it and returned it after two or three weeks of trying. To this day, everyone else I know who used one absolutely loved/loves them. My oldest son has a really bizarre keyboard on his desktop Mac, another which I cannot use. (Old dogs, new tricks thing, I guess.<g>)
Glenna
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snipped-for-privacy@pmug.org (Glenna Rose) wrote:

WOOF!
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Glenna Rose wrote:

I can't stand a regular keyboard for long. My wrists start hurting almost immediately from the awkward angle. One reason I've never considered buying a laptop.

A Kensington by chance? I think that was the name. I used to have my eye on this really weird keyboard that was two dish-shaped pads. All the keys equidistant from your fingers, and you could put the pads some considerable distance apart. I looked at it in magazines. It was extremely expensive. Then the Natural came out shortly thereafter. It's close enough. About the only good idea Microsoft ever had. Unless they ripped off this idea too.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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Silvan wrote:

IIRC the idea had been around for years. MS, with their name, made it successful.
-- Mark
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PC biscuit joiner. I just don't use it. Mortise and tenon is stronger and I prefer it to the noise and dust.
--
Ross
www.myoldtools.com
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My Old Tools wrote:

Biscuits work great for aligning edges, etc...
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Hi Ross:
Funny, but if someone started a "What's the best tool you've ever bought" thread, I'd probably rank my PC biscuit joiner in the top 5 of my tools. It's great for edge-joining and the occasional face frame. Regards, John.
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in

Funny how that works. I bought an older Ryobi at a cabinet shop's going out of business sale for fifty bucks, worried that I was throwing money away on a tool I'd never use. And it's been real handy. Banded the edge of the workbench, my panelglueing got better, put shelves in a nightstand door. It makes aligning a lot easier and faster. I don't use it a LOT but it's sure not on my list of tools I wish I never bought.
I guess that honor goes to the first "serious" tool I ever bought - a used direct-drive Craftsman table saw. At least, I *thought* it was serious when I bought it.
Almost gave up on woodworking till I found out it might be that screaming, dancing, wobble-bladed monster. Still got the stand around here someplace.
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(1) I use my Freud biscuit joiner with fair regularity. Haven't tried the 135degree thingy with it that PC advertises, but looks like it should do just fine with the fixed 90deg. fence and the adjustable fence together.
(2)Not all DD saws are screamers. My TS is an early 80's vintage Craftsman DD, but with an induction motor, not a universal(no, it's not one of the flex cable driven ones). I would love to replace it, but that's down the road a ways. With a decent blade & some blade stabilizers it does OK. The stabilizers were the best investment I made for it, because the original pressed steel ones were causing way too much runout.
--
Nahmie
Those on the cutting edge bleed a lot.
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I agree with you. I don't have a biscuit joiner. Haven't needed one yet. I use all mortise and tenon or dovetail. Of course it would be different if I were doing this for a living and not a hobby.
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I use mine for some panel glue-ups. How do you do yours? A spline? Dowels?
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...

I glue up right after jointing, lightly clamping only 3-4 boards at most at one time. I make sure the joints are flat at the ends and middle by feel, and use a rubber mallet to fine position the boards prior to tight clamping. I do the (wider) final glueup from the sections in the same way.
Works okay for me ... although I can see your point that on a big glueup it would be very handy to have a biscuit joiner.
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Nate Perkins wrote:

I wouldn't use it where I would use a heavy tenon, either...
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How about for, say, a tabletop? Rather than just edge-gluing?
Dave Hinz
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Sears table saw with lots of features instead of a Delta contractor saw with less features and better quality for same price.
foggytown wrote:

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