Oak or ash band saw curves more easily?

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Tim said:

Just in case there is some misunderstanding, it is blade lead - as in to guide or direct in a course; not lead - as in a dense malleable metal.
Blade lead refers to the direction that a particular blade wants to track, depending on the saw's setup and the set of the teeth. Every blade can differ.
For instance, when re-sawing, if the stock is not fed into the blade at the angle that the blade wants it to be, it will not cut a straight line, no matter how you force it. You only end up with score marks and frustration. Feeding at what _appears_ to be parallel with the blade is not enough. You have to check the lead of the blade and compensate for its tendency to cut towards one direction or another.
When cutting curves, the same principles apply, only the pivot point of the stock is altered to match the feed preference of the blade.
This really crude, exaggerated graphic might help:
http://webpages.charter.net/videodoctor/images/BSLead.jpg
FWIW
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If you're not being facetious, blade lead and guide blocks are pretty basic bandsaw concepts. Before you do anything else with your bandsaw, I'd strongly recommend that get a bandsaw book or 2 - I like "The Bandsaw Handbook" by Duginske, though there are several other bandsaw books out by Duginske and others. Check your local library or (Amazon.com product link shortened)60974307/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-9120848-0525634?ie=UTF8&s=books (that's http://tinyurl.com/yg9tfq if the link is too long) Very informative, good background on bandsaws, how to set them up, tune them to reduce vibration, what can be done with various types and thickness of blades, etc. Good luck, Andy
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time... You have more experience than I do, so you already know that, but what the hell, it's a news group.. *g*
Do the best cut you can, then clamp the pieces together and sand them all at once.. if the shape changes a bit, it will at least be a uniform design improvement, not a screw-up, right?
In my experience, most marks from the BS are from too aggressive a set on the blade, and not following the curve smoothly... every little wiggle of the stock is going to leave marks.. Think about how we hold stuff on a TS compared to a BS... hard against the fence, feather boards, etc... BS stuff is more ART than precision, I guess.. lol
Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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