Norm's show on the bowfront chest

I was paying special attention to the part of Norm's show on the bowfront chest where he laminated the curved fronts of the drawers in the chest having not done to well in a similar lamination project myself this winter. Norm said he used a glue which set up more slowly and didn't bleed through the 1/8" thick pieces of wood that he laminated. Did anyone catch the type of glue that he used?
TIA.
Dick Snyder
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wrote:

I think he said "cold press" http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?FamilyIDP54
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The glue he used he called a cold press glue. The advantages he quoted were its longer open time and that it wouldn't bleed through the top veneer. I found it odd that he never made mention of the tendency of different glues to 'creep' after cured in bent laminations. I'd always read to use plastic resin glue becuase it didn't creep at all after curing. Who knows, maybe the cold press glue he referred to is actually plastic resin????
Joe

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a quick google on cold press glue turned up this link
http://www.joewoodworker.com/veneering/glues.htm
jc
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Dick Snyder wrote:
> I was paying special attention to the part of Norm's show on the bowfront > chest where he laminated the curved fronts of the drawers in the chest > having not done to well in a similar lamination project myself this winter. > Norm said he used a glue which set up more slowly and didn't bleed through > the 1/8" thick pieces of wood that he laminated. Did anyone catch the type > of glue that he used?
They ran a different program here but to comment on your question.
When you find something better than epoxy with a slow hardener for laminating, let me know.
It doesn't creep, is waterproof and has at least 30 minute open time, unless you are working in direct sun light like I do most of the time.
The down side is that you wear protective gloves.
Lew
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Lew,
How rough is the cured epoxy on blades? I know that plastic resin is *very* rough on them.
jc

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Joe wrote:
> > How rough is the cured epoxy on blades? I know that plastic resin is *very* > rough on them.
I don't have a clue; however; a laminate of knitted glass and epoxy will destroy a 9", 16 grit, abrasive disk in a hurry.
Just curious, what makes you ask?
Lew
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I always need to clean up the edges of bent laminations, usually by running them over the jointer first, and then the opposite edge either through the planer or the table saw and was wondering if epoxy would be easier on the blades than plastic resin.
jc
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Joe wrote:
> I always need to clean up the edges of bent laminations, usually by running > them over the jointer first, and then the opposite edge either through the > planer or the table saw and was wondering if epoxy would be easier on the > blades than plastic resin.
Sounds like it might be a candidate for a 12" disk sander.
Lew
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I've never had a significant problem w/ carbide blades w/ epoxies nor resin glues w/ such a technique -- there simply isn't enough of it in the glue joint to be significant to a carbide blade. HSS is another question, of course. This also assumes the squeeze out is minimal or taken care of prior to running over the jointer -- I would run the side through the saw and cut it down first if that were the case rather than start w/ the jointer or, as someone else mentioned, I sanding disc would be an alternative.
The problem w/ epoxy/glass is more the glass fibers than the epoxy itself, and the glue line in commercial plywood is thicker and harder than what would get in the suggested application here...
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Thanks for the quick replies. Cold Press sounds right based on my memory of the bits of a word I heard him say.

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Well, Franklin (Titebond) seems to be a sponsor of his show. And Franklin sells a Cold Press Veneering glue. At least they did a couple of years ago.
http://www.titebond.com/ProductLineTB.asp?prodline &prodcat=3
That turned out to be a good looking project, didn't it? Maybe just a bit beyond what could be easily shown in a 22 minute show, but nice. And the finishing stage on the mahogany didn't screw it up too badly, even with the filler stuff spooned on...
Patriarch
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