New shop

OK, so I had to appease the missus and let her have someplace to park the van. I don't have a pic of the completed version, but here are a couple of links to give you an idea.
Google SketchUp file: http://www.filefactory.com/file/f6f442 /
JPG of the whole structure (from SketchUp):
http://www.freeimagehosting.net/image.php?21da3ae2b0.jpg
JPG of the shop floor plan (from SketchUp):
http://www.freeimagehosting.net/image.php?05a337da52.jpg
Briefly, this is the largest garage that can be constructed in my area. The entire floor area is 720 SF, of which roughly 470 SF is shop. There is a separate bay for the missus to park her van. The walls are 10 ft tall and are 2x6 construction. There is room for a loft above the main space.
I haven't been able to do much with it while I've been waiting for the city inspectors to give the final signoff. They (mostly) did that today. Apparently, if your garage subpanel has more than one circuit, you need a ground rod. The electrician will be doing that tomorrow. In any case, I've been thinking about how to get this thing up and going. We're in the Chicago area, so it occasionally gets cold around here. I have an overhead heater to add the BTUs (once I run the gas line, of course). I'll be insulating the walls with whatever fits in a 2x6 space. Question 1 is...what to put up on the walls? My two thoughts are either 1/2" drywall or 1/2" plywood. Offhand, I'm leaning toward the plywood because I believe I will have more flexibility on where I want to hang stuff on the walls without having to put in wall anchors. I honestly don't know the cost difference. As for the ceiling, I plan to put down plywood on the floor of the loft area. Should I drywall the ceiling to brighten the space up?
Any thoughts on what I should do now in general that will be harder to do later and I'll wish I did them now?
todd
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Run compressed air , and vacuum lines.
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Todd,
Congratulations on your new playhouse.
My 22 x 22 shop was completed last week. Not completed yet, but at least I got the final inspection. I still have to paint the interior and exterior. (my decision to paint, a contractor did all the real work.)
I have insulated 2 x 6 framing, on 16-inch centers. Insulated overhead garage door. No windows on the South or West sides. A bunch of insulation in the ceiling, but no access for storage. I am more concerned about the heat in summer than the cool weather in winter. I have 9 4-foot two-bulb fluorescent fixtures mounted on my 8-foot ceiling for general lighting. I will supplement that with swing arm lamps for additional task lighting.
To answer Question 1; I elected to go with drywall. It is quieter. With studs on 16-inch centers I can hang most anything on them. I would not trust 1/2-inch plywood or drywall for hanging anything. Except maybe a coat hook for a shop apron or baseball cap.
Thoughts on things to do now rather than later?
Have plenty of lighting.
Have plenty of electrical outlets. (In addition to 12 120VAC 20 amp duplex outlets, I have 4 240VAC 30 amp outlets.)
Paint or do whatever is left to do before you move in any stationary tools or equipment.
John Flatley (born and raised in Chicago) Jacksonville, Florida
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Did he mention more lights and power???
I just added a 2nd garage for a car, and the contractor about shat himself when I told him 4 banks of 4ft double lights, and 4 plug outlets every 6 feet, chest high around 3 sides. Same as my main garage/shop. I like the light, and it's very easy to find a plug for all the power stuff.
If you don't need a plug, it just sits there. When you need one, or six, they are close and handy. And it's easy to add initially, hard to add six months down the road.
Hope this helps.....
John Flatley wrote:

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rich wrote:

One can also simply install a box, run the wire to it with a 6" loop of wire stuffed in the box and then go on downstream to the next (live & functional) box (effectively completely wiring every other box). That way, when an additional outlet is needed, simply plunge cut your wall finish (you *did* precisely measure and/or mark the box location on the wall finish, right?) and install the additional outlet at that time. If dollars get tight, this is a reasonable and economical way to plan for the future -- as the only real expense is that empty box (less than a dollar) - plus (for the nit-pickers) that additional 6" of wire looped in the box. If you never use it, then you are out, effectively, nothing. One should plan for this additional load on the circuit (6 outlets, generally, for a 15 amp circuit --- 8 outlets for a 20 amp). Smart thing would be to wire about 4 or 5 outlets on a 20 amp circuit -- as, generally, every outlet isn't in use simultaneously, so precise 'rules' are not absolutely required.
-- john.
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todd wrote:

<snip>
I'll be

<snip>
I lean towards the plywood. If you're going to pay someone to hang and finish the sheetrock, the cost difference is inconsequential. I lucked into a deal at HD on some 3/4 plywood and used it in my shop. The building is super rigid (it's a metal building) with the plywood interior and I can hang anything on the walls easily without messing with finding studs. The only drawback is that the interior space is darker (my plywood is varnished) than a painted sheetrock interior would be. It needs more artificial light.
Rick
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I'd go with the drywall. It will be far more fire resistant than plywood. If you're going to finish the walls consider blown in cellulose insulation. It's cheap, environmentally safe, and works well.
todd wrote:

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"M Berger" wrote in message

Agreed ... is also available with built-in bug protection, built in mold protection, and, as long as other things are done in that regard, will offer a decent sound barrier to boot.
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Last update: 1/06/07
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