New House/Shop becoming a reality

Page 2 of 5  

wrote:

Building your own is always a trip. Looks like a nice quiet area for a CNC. <G>
Congrats!
LOL... reminds me of a comedian I was watching on TV a few years back. He was telling about a neighbor that let his dog out at night for the sole purpose of "barking" the place up.
Thanks
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Congrats, I think.

Jeeze, what is that, 3,000 s/f? Looks big.

Why are all the tubafores standing on their tippytoes? DSCF0032
What's the orange tubing, floor heat? Seems sparse. Or rebar for stressing the concrete? IMG_0735
Why by a lot in a tract vs wide open spaces, on a hillock? (build one?)
Are you in the floodplain? I couldn't tell where your lot was from that map.
Do you live in Kansas? That's some flatland there, ain't it? Oh, Sugarland, TX. Same/same.
Hurricane-proof house? I don't see as -any- ties or shear walls. I thought I'd see tons for that dangerous kind of area. Your tubasixes are casually toenailed to the sill. Scary. Tie that puppy down, boy!
-- Experience is a good teacher, but she send in terrific bills. -- Minna Thomas Antrim
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Nov 3, 6:33 pm, Larry Jaques <

Sonny
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

OH, I forgot the wet Chinese sheetrock. Pardon me.
Texas must not follow international code.
-- Experience is a good teacher, but she send in terrific bills. -- Minna Thomas Antrim
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think after checking the flood plane, I checked on the sheet rock manufacturer. ;~)
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/4/2010 7:22 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

It does ... but you have to be informed before you flap your trap.
You guys can laugh, but drywall can actually be an element in a properly designed shearwall (albeit a weak one, but it does have shear resistance which adds to the total effect), particularly in a hurricane prone area, but not so much in earthquake zones.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wouldn't trust the stuff (though I live in an old house, and so therefore consequently do) for a shear wall. I think it's particularly bad for cyclic loading, like you said, in seismic zones. Gypsum shear walls for residential construction have largely gone the way of the dodo with the "new and improved" building code. Using gypsum for the shear wall would cause a typical plan examiner to immediately break out the red stamp unless there were specific structural notation/calculation from an engineer.
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/tal.491/abstract http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/pdf1985/patto85a.pdf
R
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/4/2010 9:50 AM, RicodJour wrote:

SHEEEEESSSH! No where did I say, or imply, that drywall was sufficient for a properly designed shear wall and that you should "trust" it in that application.
To intimate that is ridiculous.
What I said is that drywall can be an element in the cumulative shear resistance of a shear wall.
Of that there is NO question.
Jeezusss ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Did you take an extra sensitivity pill this morning? I made no comment on your beliefs, I did not read any implications into your comments, nor did I infer any. I merely gave my professional opinion on gypsum as a shear wall component. I realize Leon is your BFF, but you probably shouldn't go looking for battles where there aren't any.
R
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

fixed it for you.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RE: Subject
Leon, you have your space allocations all screwed up.
2,200+ sq ft = living space 600+ sq ft = shop space
Your priorities are definitely bass ackwards<G>.
Lew
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Totally agree! ;~) Knock out the center of the garage back wall and and another wall behind that and gain an area 12' x 26'
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Leon" wrote:

-------------------------------- Why wait, or is this a negotiation ploy?<G>
Lew
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

2257 + approx 600 garage

?
Insulated cable for stressing the slab. About 60 of them, they run down inside the footings also.

Looked into that extensively many years ago, bought the land and never wrnt past that point due to job relocations. It is still appealing but this hose was literally the right price, about 25% less that what we would have had to pay about 6 months ago.

That is the first thing I look for, we are not even in the 500 year flood plane. Our current house is, we had flood insurance for about 25 years in our old house and Omaha sold out to Fidelity for flood insurance. Fedelity did not observe the law and canceled our insurance and demanded we pay $3,600 per year for flood insurance, we had been paying $230. I dropped the insurance for a few years, got an elevation survey and now pay $700 per year. We should have been grandfathered-in and my attourney said we can fight and will win but it is going to cost you much more.

Was the Sugar Land area, now the North Richmond TX area, just west of Sugar Land and just south of Katy, Tx.

Actually this area only sees a hurricane on average about once every 25 years, we had one 2 years ago previous to that in 1983 and 1962. The new house is rated for 125 mile per hour winds and even with a Cat 4 hurricane at the coast, 60 miles inland the winds are much less. We have much more of a threat from flooding and oddly enough tornados al thoufh not the big ones. Old house is marginally closer tot he gulf and had faired well during the hurricanes that it has gone through. If I were much closer to the coast I would be much more concerned.

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm still wondering about the garage doing double duty for your woodworking. Considering the amount and quality of woodworking you do, I'm surprised you didn't organize a dedicated workshop. Obviously, you've considered it all and the garage is all you really need. Guess it's just me and my preferences getting in the way.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Perfectly insulated, I hope. Big!

Interesting.
Too bad about the old land. RE the new lot: steenkin' HOA, tract, and flat area probably all go together to reduce the value.

Good.
Too bad it isn't 150 years ago and you could settle it out of court with one .56 Spenser round, huh?

Fort Stinkin' Desert! No, wait, that was Phoenix.

Surprising.
Good, but I'd have spent the extra few hundred to tie that puppy down were it my new pride and joy. YMOV
-- Experience is a good teacher, but she send in terrific bills. -- Minna Thomas Antrim
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Better than Energy Star rated.

Actually this house is the same I was refering to but in a different and IMHO better location. That along with slow new home sales, except in this area apparently. The builder has been in this particular location since late August. They have completed 4 spec homes and sold 2 of them, is building and sold 2 made to order homes. Currently there 8 spec homes under construction. They plan to build 50 or so homes to finish the community IIRC.

Houston is in a very unique location along the gulf coast, It is a rare event to have a hurricane strike directly and or get much wind if any from a close hitting storm. Five years ago about a month after Katrina hurricane Rita was aimed for Houston and there was a mass exodus. The storm ended up hitting about 60-80 miles to our east and IIRC it only got a little windy, it was basically a non event. I grew up in Corpus Christi, about 200 miles south and literally on the water. While I lived there and during the period from 1962 to 1971 I went through 3 major hurricanes. Only 1 of those storms was a direct hit, the other two were at least 100 miles away and those storms delt a major blow in Corpus Christi. I think because Houston is inland about 60 miles and is sort of in a bend along the coast line the winds deminish quite rapidly when the storms hit land.

You have to draw the line some where and those things don't help when a tornato hits the house. Typically most damage during a hurricane is not caused directly by the hurricane winds rather from the debris that is flying arouned and as swingman will attest to, rising water is the biggest threat. Again hurricane straps don't help in that instance. Additionally hurricanes in this region typically spawn multiple tornatos and again the straps are not going to do much good against those winds and or micro bursts. If I lived closer to he water, I would opt for the straps.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Excellent.
--snip--
That's good...for you, but not the inline folks.

Yeah, I forgot about that. It's just a few miles which take the wind out of a hurricane's sails, isn't it?

Gotcha. Hey, structured wiring is a great tradeoff if you're not in a windy corridor. Enjoy it!
-- If we attend continually and promptly to the little that we can do, we shall ere long be surprised to find how little remains that we cannot do. -- Samuel Butler
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

<load Rant Master diatribe engine> There are innumerable old houses that have withstood hurricanes just fine, thank you very much, before the advent of the "new and improved (now less nutritious!) code". You're buying into the insurance lobby's efforts and scare-mongering in general. Leon had it right. You get hit by a tornado or a serious flood, and, no matter how well you built it, well...it was a nice house, wasn't it?
A hurricane is no great shakes unless the house was substandard and shoddily built, which was exactly the situation with a lot of those Florida homes that got blown up. Stapled shingles (with a lot of missing fasteners), unbraced gable walls, and just shit construction in general.
The insurance industry saw an opportunity to tighten their belt (which means the noose around the homeowner's neck) and pushed to have the code "fixed" to prevent them paying out...errr...the homeowner sustaining a loss. Now there's this ridiculous impact code thing for windows in areas that are hardly at risk. I'm in NY, and I've experienced a few hurricanes, and many high winds. The old houses, without all of the metal strapping and bullshit window code stuff, aren't flying apart. Biggest problem are trees hitting the house. I'm surprised that the insurance industry and the scare-mongers haven't outlawed trees within 100' of a house!
When the big wind does come, the insurance companies are looking for ways to not pay. They're building in new and improved ways to not pay. You opted for the $250 window instead of the $1500 impact one? Sorry, no dough for you! When you start adding up the cost of all of that bullshit, and the real risk of your particular home getting blasted, it's a better move to not carry the insurance and assume the negligible risk yourself.
Unfortunately, since they were able to get all of this nonsense incorporated into the code, you don't have a choice if you're pulling a permit and getting inspections. You pay _and_ you lose! How convenient. Must be nice to drum up business by selling stuff that isn't needed by scaring the shit out of people and buying off code officials with dinners, vacations and hookers. </rant>
R
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/5/2010 9:22 PM, RicodJour wrote:

Welcome to the United Corporations of America, backed by a Congress which keeps getting itself re-elected by an ignorant, easily manipulated electorate. A land where the "right" of _everyman_ to vote will be its eventual kiss of death.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.