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I wanted a sink in the shop to clean up paint brushes, dump and replenish water from my sharpening stones, other things.
I can't have a sink connected to the water, or septic without paying a huge tax increase.
So here's my solution.. still a work in progress:
I picked up a big stainless steel kitchen sink for $1 at a garage sale, and yesterday picked up a kitchen cabinet. I cut out the top for the sink today. and moved it to the basement.
Now I plan on using 2x 5gal buckets, one for fresh water, and one for waste water. I need to get a pump to pump the water from the fresh tank to a faucet. That will drain to the waste tank. After settling I figure I can pump or siphon the clean (top ) water back to the fresh water and keep doing that until I need to dump it....
I started looking for pump online.. they aren't cheap... Has anyone done this??
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tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in

It sounds like gravity could be your friend here. Put the upper bucket above the faucet and let gravity supply the pressure. Get one of those hand crank pumps from harbor freight and use that to replenish the upper bucket. Just my 2¢ YMMV
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I have cabinets above.. Its the only space I could fit it. I had originally thought that I would use gravity. But the cabinet (I got it for free) was wider than the original area in my storage area.. near my sump pump.. I originally figured I dump the waste water there when it was ready to be dumped..
No handcranking here. Hit a switch or step on a pedal and pump... not real strong... I started looking into fountain pumps.. They seem to be cheaper. and maybe can handle the dirty water side too...
On 5/23/2012 11:25 PM, Steve wrote:

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I don't know where you're located, but you might check Grainger (www.grainger.com) for Little Giant pumps. They make submersable and conventional centrifugal pumps. I've used them for several applications, and they seem to give good performance and value. I was also able to find repair parts locally (younger helper tightening an NPT fitting into a plastic housing...).
On May 23, 10:42 pm, tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

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One thing that you must consider is that 5 gallons of water will be quite heavy. Something on the order of 40 pounds, so a shelf or bucket holder must be able to support that weight.
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 5/23/2012 11:25 PM, Steve wrote:

Or divert a gutter drain to it.
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Camper supply store.. Pump used to run the sink from a supply tank when not connected to a water supply.
"tiredofspam" wrote in message
I wanted a sink in the shop to clean up paint brushes, dump and replenish water from my sharpening stones, other things.
I can't have a sink connected to the water, or septic without paying a huge tax increase.
So here's my solution.. still a work in progress:
I picked up a big stainless steel kitchen sink for $1 at a garage sale, and yesterday picked up a kitchen cabinet. I cut out the top for the sink today. and moved it to the basement.
Now I plan on using 2x 5gal buckets, one for fresh water, and one for waste water. I need to get a pump to pump the water from the fresh tank to a faucet. That will drain to the waste tank. After settling I figure I can pump or siphon the clean (top ) water back to the fresh water and keep doing that until I need to dump it....
I started looking for pump online.. they aren't cheap... Has anyone done this??
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Thanks, I'll see what I can find..
.
On 5/23/2012 11:35 PM, geoff wrote:

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On Wed, 23 May 2012 23:18:14 -0400, tiredofspam wrote:

How about one of those pumps that they use in outdoor water falls to pump water from the pond back up to the top of the waterfall. Don't know what they cost, but should do the job.
Paul T.
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Somewhere between $30 and $70 from what I've seen. Many fixtures are plumbed with 1/2" pipe, so a small utility pump that can fill that should be good enough.
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 5/23/2012 9:18 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

Are you sure about that? Maybe things are different where you live but in my neck of the woods, property taxes are based on property valuation. Adding a functional sink would add little or nothing the the property's value, hence would cause at most a miniscule increase in property taxes.
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Yes I am sure. Even a slop sink raises the rate here big time. I don't know why, wherever I have lived I always had a slop sink in the basement.
They look for heat in the basement, and any water when doing a reassesment. Once you add water/or heat this becomes a full living space. Not for bedrooms though. And the assesment is increased by quite a bit.
On 5/24/2012 2:46 AM, Just Wondering wrote:

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As a ex-NJer, I can say the areas I lived in weren't that way. In every house we had a sink in the basement, even a half or full bath. Not sure what area you live in, but I've never heard that one before.
Moved my mother into a new house just five years ago with a slop sink, which she specifically added, and she pays nothing extra for it. Granted she pays more in property taxes, but I've got her beat in school and other area taxes here in Ohio, and I live in a rural area.
Have you looked at the portable sinks often used in fairs and other large outdoor events? They are foot pump driven with self-contained fresh and grey tanks. I've seen used ones come up on craigslist... http://sinksnmore.com/index.html?page=product&prod_id=3
Now here's one created for outdoors, but he's put some good parts to use that might give you more options... http://www.instructables.com/id/Field-Sink /
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Yea this is a first for me too.
Like everything NJ every town has a way of doing it differently.
My town taxes you for a shed. In Linden the GAS TANKS by the the Turnpike they don't pay taxes on those huge tanks. They're not attached to the ground permanently.. (Bull Shit).. So they don't pay taxes on them as improved properties.
A township away no taxes on sheds under 90sq ft. My town originally told me the same thing, but then taxed me because I was mis informed they said.
NJ is nothing more than a bunch of political thugs. It makes Boss Hog look like a prince.
On 5/25/2012 9:16 AM, Casper wrote:

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On 5/25/2012 9:16 AM, Casper wrote:

Here is something that you could make your self (though it can be purchased at the site.)
Check the Nature Series Portable Outdoor Hand Washing Sinks
http://www.theportablesink.com/products.php?gclid=CMKDveXIm7ACFUZN4AodIS_eZQ
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On Wed, 23 May 2012 23:18:14 -0400, tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

You'll probably not be re-using the water very much - paint won't settle out enough for you to wash your hands and not have at least a little color added.
For a supply pump, even the small pond/fountain pumps provide several gallons/minute.
If you can extend the drain plumbing to the sump pump, you won't have to lift and dump that pail. That should make up for the additional fresh water you'd need to supply wih a direct-to-drain system.
A possible alternative supply arrangement would be to use a garden hose from an outside faucet and control the water with a sprnkler valve. The wiring is 24 voltds, so you don't need an electrician. The valves are often 3/4 NPT, but adapters are available from 3/4 NPT to hose bibb (slightly different 3/4" thread). If you have rain gutters on the shop, could you run a downspout to a barrel and collect the rainwater? Set the barrel up high enough for gravity flow or use a pond/fountain pump to get the water to the sink.
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On 5/23/2012 11:18 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

If you can collect your waste in a five gallon bucket, is there any reason that you can not set it outside and water the flowers with it. (if you know what I mean)
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On Wed, 23 May 2012 23:18:14 -0400, tiredofspam wrote:

I made a similar project for a science classroom the didn't have access to a lab.
I found a roll around stainless cabinet that was designed for work area for outdoor cooking (got this on sale at kmart I think) cut in a sink on one end used a pond pump for supply pressure and 2-5 gallon buckets that stored neatly in cabinet.
I cut in a couple of electrical boxes on the end of the cabinet, one for additional outlets and another for water proof toggle swith to control pump, installed a gfc breaker internally for saftey should something go wrong.
I wound up with north of $300 in the whole thing, but the associated science club footed most of the bill.
basilisk
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How many gallon per minute pump did you use. I figure the lift cuts the pressure down, so that part has been hard to figure.
Figure lifting 30 inches, what would be good. My guess was 160gph which is about 2.7gpm.. but with lift I am not sure what I'll wind up with, most specs online don't go into lift vs gph...
Thanks....
Most didn't read the part where I am in a basement, so a lot of advice that does not apply..
On 5/24/2012 8:23 AM, basilisk wrote:

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On Thu, 24 May 2012 08:43:22 -0400, tiredofspam wrote:

pond pump, flow was somewhere around 2 gpm out the sink spout, this is decent considering the volume you will have to work with.
Plug the hot side of the faucet or someone will leave it open and flood bottom side.
basilisk

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