Need table saw advice

Page 2 of 4  
Marc wrote:

If I had the space and that budget, I'd consider two contractor saws. Ideally one left tilt and the other right tilt. No doubt one of them would have the dado set installed more or less permanently. I'd use my dado a LOT more if it wasn't for the time to change blades, and the fact "normal" TS rips and crosscuts can't be done when my TS has the dado in.
-- Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There's a BIG difference between a cabinet saw and a contractor saw. A contractor saw is lighter (more flimsy) for portability, and lacks good dust collection. A heavier machine has less vibration for a more accurate cut. Keep in mind, though, that there are better quality contractor saws than cabinet saws.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Did that come out like you wanted?
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 9/21/03
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What contractor saws are better quality than which cabinet saws? Are you refering to grizzly or craftsman? I've been told they are pretty high quality overall except for the fence, and they decent comparisons with other cabinet saws in "wood" magazine (I think it was wood).

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'd rather have a Powermatic contractor tablesaw than a Craftsman cabinet saw. Another point to make it more confusing, there are "hybrid saws" that have properties of both contractor and cabinet. I'd recommend the Grizzly G1023S which is an icredible buy at $800 and close to the cost of a Powermatic 64A which is a very good contractor saw.
On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 21:05:05 GMT, "Marc"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Really, I'm surprised. Is that just a strong brand preference or is the powermatic contractor saw just plain better?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Buy the best you can afford and have fun. Life is too short not to have fun.
Good tools are a delight to use and, in the right hands, make projects more enjoyable. I have a Dela Unisaw. My only regret is not having a garage big enough.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
yep, I love the "life is too short" argument. Only problem is I've over used it a bit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 17:26:40 GMT, "Marc"

I would never suggest that anyone buy below their WANTS because we all have something we go "over the top" on. I certainly do-- read the electrical set-up below my signature. ;> Having said that, my opinion is: get a top-of-the-line contractor's saw. Why?
1.) While it's true that one should avoid the "pretend" table saws that are available for under $200 at Sears, Home Depot and, (for all I know), Toys-BackwardsR-Us, it's equally true that there are a lot more cabinet saws in hobbyist's shops than there are cabinet-saw quality hobbyists using them.
2.) If, as you state, precision and a perfect fit are your goals as a beginner, then you will achieve them faster and continue reaching them longer by buying the best contractor saw you can afford and putting the other 800 to 1000 dollars into a week's worth of education at a good woodworking school. It isn't the brush that paints the picture, it's the artist. Studying with people who really know their craft is priceless.
3.) We-- (Americans)-- put too much emphasis on tablesaws, anyway. An awful lot of this world does just fine with a really good bandsaw as their weapon of choice. Consider that with the exception of dadoing, everything you do on a table saw is going to be only the first step in the overall process of dimensioning lumber. Other machinery or hand tools are going to be required to dress out what you cut. It's in those stages that you achieve the precision you're looking for. (Cutting plywood doesn't qualify here, either. Precision plywood cutting for panels, backs and bottoms is dependent on a quality fence and proper feeding technique, not a "quality" cabinet saw.)
4.) Should you decide, in the future that you just can't get through a project without cutting lotso 3" thick Maple and you just gotta have more horseys, you'll be glad to have a second saw to use as a dedicated Dado machine. Think of how cool you'll be in your neighborhood as the only guy with not one, but two tablesaws.
5, and finally.) It will, (or should, anyway) cost you at least another several hundred dollars for the quality support tools you will need to reach the precision you say you demand. Squares, guages, markers, chisels, planes, etc., aren't cheap. Matter o' fact they're darned pricey. Are they in your budget? Can't do quality precision work without them. What about Jointers, Planers, etc.? Got Money? <tm>
Michael Who just moved and because of space and easement constraints is building a leetle 12X16 shop and has a 4-outlet 110V box on every other stud, and a 220V box about a foot off the floor below those. Fifty-six(!) 110's and 14(!) 220s for 192 square feet. That outtabout doit.
12X16 Building materials: $2500 All the above electrical capacity: $300 and counting. The ability to plug something in right HERE, and not have to settle for "over there": Priceless. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Michael Baglio

How many circuit breakers? Code has a limit on the number of outlets allowed on a breaker.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Heh... whatever my electrician friend tells me I need, Jack. That'll be the next trip to sLowe's. I haven't done any of this shop building without some serious adult supervision. ;>
(Btw, I recall several months ago you responding to a request of mine for general pricing guidelines on shop building materials. Iirc, you quoted a friend's shop, recently built. That post really gave me a lot of "go-for-it" that I didn't have previously. So, if I didn't thank you, thanks. Youdaman.)
Michael
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Michael Baglio

Your welcome and I'm glad the information I provided helped.
The friend I mentioned has been using that building for about a year. He's already talking about bumping it out. There's a lot to be said for "post and beam" construction.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's a good point and one I have considered a lot. Probably the reason I am asking a group so I can separate and distinguish my wants from my needs. If all I have is a shop with a great table saw, I'm not going to be able to do much. There will be more funds in the near future but what will I do until then? I have some nice hand tools, Japanese chisels, LN 4 1/2 plane, and a few other items. but I am using a router table for a jointer which is not very suitable. I need some better squares and clamps etc. not to mention WOOD, it's not cheap.
On the other hand maybe it is better to get this one big item out-of-the-way so I never have to consider it again, and slowly build a shop of only quality items over time.
I've heard of people subsituting a quality band-saw and using it for a table-saw duty, that is what laguana seems to suggest on their band saw video. But I don't see how that could work, small table, no dado, table tilts instead of blade, lateral limitation by yoke of band saw, I just don't see that working out.
It's a tough question, and it makes me realize how expensive this hobby is.
Thanks for your input.
Marc
"Michael Baglio @nc.rr.com>" <mbaglio<NOSPAM> wrote in message wrote: .....

......
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Can someone explain to me the fascination with dado blades on table saws? I use a router for all dados (it SEEMS easier). All woodworkers have at least one router, so why do people use table saws for dados ?
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 14 Nov 2003 04:33:01 +0000, David Binkowski wrote:

1) stacked dado can be set to exact width required (up to 13/16") and done in one pass.
2) full depth can be done in one pass.
3) faster setup against fence or on sled.
4) chips/dust can be somewhat more easily controlled.
5) tablesaws don't suffer from ARHA. (DAMHIKT)
-Doug
BTW, I use my stacked dado on my RAS as my TS is a weenie tabletop model with a short arbor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Binkowski wrote:

I thought exactly the same thing. But when building a bookcase for my teenage daughter I needed to make a bunch of 3/4" dados. The ones on the ends of the up and down parts would be no problem on my router table, but the ones in the middle would have required demounting my DW 621 from the router table. So I took the time to set up my dado in the table saw.
Wow! It cut much faster than the router! I didn't have to make two or three passes to get the cuts as deep as desired, one pass through the dado on my dado-enabled Grizzly contractor saw worked peachy keen. It was no more a problem to cut the dados in the middle of the 4' board than the ends!
The fantasy shop of my dreams has (at least <g>) three table saws. My current Grizzly contractor saw is the permanent "just a shade under 3/4" dado" saw for cutting dados for plywood shelves. A fantasy right-tilt cabinet saw has a sliding table attachment. A fantasy left-tilt cabinet saw with a long fence lets me rip a 4x8' sheet anywhere I durn well please.
Back in the real world of my single car garage shop and my single Griz saw, for certain cuts I take the time to mount the dado.
-- Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark Jerde wrote:

Mine too. Or at least two. I don't even *have* a dado set yet, but I sure could use one. I'm all the time doing multi-pass, clean-up-with-a-chisel type stuff. One thing keeping me from buying a dado set (other than money) is the thought that while my current method is tedious, at least I don't have to screw with changing the blade. So... I'd like to have a dedicated dado saw.
You can do so much with a table saw in that fashion. Even cut tenons without bothering to build a tenoning jig. I think a dado set would be very damn handy. Surely a lot easier than doing any of these jobs with a router. Especially with *my* anemic, inaccurate, screaming piece of crap.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 14 Nov 2003 04:33:01 GMT, "David Binkowski"

I've done it both ways, and I found the tablesaw to be more precise and faster setup.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I was building some vertical storage bins for framing fillet recently and had to cut 1/4" dados in FULL sheets of MDF for the backing... 3" apart. I cut 4 sheets in an hour and a half. Could you do that with a router as quickly??? ;-) Oh, yah, no dust!
Dave.
David Binkowski wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave wrote:

FULL 4x8' sheets? You must have a great outfeed / infeed / side support system. Or do you have one of those European monsters with the sliding table attached?
-- Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.