Need Help with Physical and Aesthetic Centre of Gravity on Speaker Stands (w/pic)

Hello everyone,
I started on my first bit of woodworking not related to home renovations tonight for the first time in a real long time.
I lost the shelves that my small bookshelf speakers rested on and I wanted something to hold them off the floor beside the TV.
I almost got them done tonight but I got stuck with the physical and aesthetic center of gravity placement of the vertical post vs. the top and bottom platforms.
The speakers are 20 year old Infinity RS1000's that I replaced the main drivers in two years ago due to surround cracking from age.
I am at a loss at where the vertical post should meet the top and bottom platform so they look good and don't topple.
http://www.federatedtool.com/david/img/splayout.jpg
Any ideas?
Thanks,
David.
Every Neighbourhood has one, in Mine I'm Him
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
: Hello everyone,
: I started on my first bit of woodworking not related to home renovations : tonight for the first time in a real long time.
: I lost the shelves that my small bookshelf speakers rested on and I wanted : something to hold them off the floor beside the TV.
: I almost got them done tonight but I got stuck with the physical and : aesthetic center of gravity placement of the vertical post vs. the top and : bottom platforms.
: The speakers are 20 year old Infinity RS1000's that I replaced the main : drivers in two years ago due to surround cracking from age.
: I am at a loss at where the vertical post should meet the top and bottom : platform so they look good and don't topple.
My guess is that (assuming the speakers are vertically symmetric) if you center the speker on the top platform, a line straight down from the center of the platform is the "topple point", where you'll need support to both sides of that point. How wide are the platforms? How much support to each side you need depends on a few things -- how heavy the speakers are, how heavy and stable the stands are, and how loud you play music.
Any chance you could screw/bolt the lower platform to the floor? That way you could have them cantilevered out.
    -- Andy Barss
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jul 24, 2:26 am, "David F. Eisan"
[snip]

For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.... then there's Hooke's law. At a certain resonant frequency, those boxes will vibrate the stand and set up a whipping action which, although likely invisible, will muddy up the sound at that frequency. A speaker stand should always be robust to try to stop the box from bouncing around. Mass and rigidity is what we're after here.
r
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.