Need advice from woodworking guys

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Hi Guys - My husband loves woodworking and I love him, but the sawdust, woodchips, and whatever else that is continuously tracked into the rest of the house from the basement is making me crazy. It's not like he doesn't try to clean up after himself, but there is a lot of small sawdust that does not get vacuumed up. I thought I'd ask the guys who would know, what do you do to keep the dust down? - Janice
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wear overalls/aprons/sweatshirts/etc. and take them off in the shop at the door. I also have shoes that I use only in the shop, and take them off before going in the house (I have a detached garage as my shop). I also use the shopvac on myself if I'm particularly dirty.
One of the biggest improvements was to get a good dust collector and make sure I use it diligently. It helps a lot, but isn't perfect. A little dust will always make it into the house, so I throw my clothes in the hamper and take a shower right away.
That's about all you can do, I think.
The thing I've tried to get my wife to realize is that a little dust and/or wood chips is not the end of the world and to try to chill out and not make such a big deal over it. Hasn't worked yet hehe
Mike

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Janice, A nice 30' x 50' heated and airconditioned shop out back would take care of most of the problem. If that isn't an option a good dust colletor and air cleaner will go a long way but I don't think there is anything that is going to be 100 percent. If he has a compressor he might use it to dust himself off but be sure it is set at a very low pressure. I also found that wiping my feet on one of those door mats that have the prickly plastic things took care of the odd chips on my shoes.
Good luck.
Stuart Johnson Red Oak, Texas

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Dust Collector Janice as I'm sure many others will tell you. Not real expensive, and would make great Christmas present :)
Mike in Arkansas who is not lucky enough to have a basement.
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Two "equipment" solutions - a dust/chip collector - attaches to various tools (or all of them at once with a fixed duct system if the tools stay put) which keeps a lot of the dust and chips from ever getting out to bother things. An air cleaner - which is basically a fan with a fine dust filter that recirculates shop air to catch floating dust. A dust collector with good fiters can do the job of both. A shop-vac is neither.
Well, OK, the third, really big, "equipment" solution is the detached shop outside the house. This may not be a fiscal reality, but it is a great solution.
Many "behavior" solutions - coveralls, aprons, hats, shoes that stay put in the shop. All of which tend to be a pain if there is a lot of running in and out of the shop. Foot-scrapers, doormats and foot brushes (generally sold for outside doors, but...). A mirror just outside the shop door. A good tight door on the shop.
--
Cats, Coffee, Chocolate...vices to live by

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On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 20:33:34 GMT, Janice Brown

Beer does a good job washing it down ;-)
Seriously, a shop apron keeps a LOT of the dust out of his clothes (leather apron is easy to keep dust free). Blowing the dust off with an air gun helps a lot. A mat at the top of the stairs that has bristles so the dust on his shoes will fall into the bristles.
A dust filtration system is helpful but I think the bulk of your concern is dust he carries on him rather than a cloud of dust following him up the stairs. A dust collection system on all of his power tools will significantly reduce the amount of dust that can be tracked or get imbedded in his clothes - these tend to be noisy so you need to make a tradeoff on which you prefer...
TWS
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TWS wrote: [sinp]

[snip]
All the things mentioned here do help but this is a good tidy up - he can even step outside to do this.
Josie
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Hi you All
Yes using air to blow off works BUT we had a guy get KILLED that way, apparently a sliver of steel got into the blow gun and then when triggered cut a small cut in the guys neck and artery, air got into the artery and killed him on the spot. This was not a wood shop and we used high pressure, still O.K. that never happens right, well it did, so take care.
have fun and take care Leo Van Der Loo
firstjois wrote:

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That's a good warning!
I don't ever point the gun at my head or neck.
Bob
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Bob wrote:

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On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 20:39:50 -0500, Leo Van Der Loo

Geez, thanks for the info. I will be sure to discharge the sprayer toward the floor before I use it on ANYTHING any more. Shuddering... TWS
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Regardless, don't use the damn things on people. Tain't worth it. You don't even need a sliver if you have an old (or user-modified new) blowgun without the side holes - the air itself can open a hole. Use a brush.
--
Cats, Coffee, Chocolate...vices to live by

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proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email

This was one of the first things I was taught NOT to do with compressed air.
Jeeezus! IIRC we had a guy here saying he blows the dust off the inside of his glasses (implication was that he was wearing them! Maybe I misunderstood.)
I thought he was joking.
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On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 20:33:34 GMT, Janice Brown

I also work in a basement, and have the same problems. Here's what works for me.
#1 - Keep the stairs swept or vacuumed!
#2 - Keep the shop floor swept. Painting or coating concrete makes it easier to sweep.
#3 - A dust collector helps, IF you keep up with #1 & #2. This isn't a cure-all, chips still occasionally get out of jointers, planers, router tables, etc... and saws spit dust off the top of the blade. It helps quite a bit, though. Dust collectors do nothing for chips and dust created by hand tools and some hand held power tools.
#4 - Sweep the stairs again. <G>
Barry
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

All the suggestions for dust collectors and such are going to help but I believe my wife came up with the ultimate solution. It consists of a hook on the back of the door where a change of clothes are hung along with a pair of slippers.
Of course there are times when I try to circumvent the solution but for the most part.........................
--
MikeG
Heirloom Woods
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 20:33:34 GMT, Janice Brown

I can't, so I keep it out. Workshop wear is smooth fabric trousers (cheap mil-surplus combats) and similar shirts. I'm usually wearing a sweater, and that comes off and gets left in the workshop.
For woodturning, I wear a French Cheesemaker's Smock in a smooth surfaced linen. http://www.folkwear.com/102.html This square pattern with armpit gussets is ridiculously easy to sew up, and one of the most comfortable shirts for heavy "long reach" work that I've had without spending over a day in sewing and fitting it.
Mum has a tiled kitchen and porch-like utility room. Dad doesn't get let back into the carpeted part of the house until she's hoovered him 8-)
I also try to control dust in the workshop. There's a bench brush hanging behind the bench and it gets used every couple of minutes. The cabinet saw keeps most of its dust inside it, but the other machines have dust extraction. The main culprit for dust is a router, and I don't use that much, preferring hand planes.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Given the ribbald and unmoderated tenor of rec.woodworking, my reading of this comment shows that your smiley is well deserved!
Ken Muldrew snipped-for-privacy@ucalgazry.ca (remove all letters after y in the alphabet)
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On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 21:40:07 +0000, Andy Dingley

Nothing like a good hoovering every now and again...

Gee Andy, I thought you mostly made chips and curls not dust...
TWS
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'been routing plywood last few days. Took me a good while to find where I'd put the router table !
Last week I made a frame for a stained glass window (internal dorway - indoors both sides). Like a total muppet I ended up hand planing twenty four foot of complicated moulding. Good fun, but it's no way to make a living.
I was also using shop-bought timber (the shame!) which was brand-new pineywood. Obviously kiln-dried, the knots in it were hard enough to chip my favourite carving gouge. Fortunately I did this while I was cutting them back to save the irons in the moulders, or I'd be _really_ annoyed.
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I have to smile when I read about all these people who use aprons, smocks, and other such garb while woodworking. I live in a rather warm part of the world. We practically work naked for a better part of the year. Oh yeah and its wet sometimes. In the last 24 hours, some surrounding areas are reporting 20 inches of rain. Dry wood is a relative term around here.
Glub, Glub Gurgle.
Bob Davis Houston, Texas
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