Need a new TS rip blade.

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I have been using a Freud, forget which one exactly. Anyway I've had it for too many years and want a new one. I have a Woodcraft near me as well as a HD and Lowes. I need to pick it up before the weekend. Has anybody used the RIDGID 10 In. x 90 Tooth Ultimate Polished Finish Saw Blade? http://tinyurl.com/2fvoo24
Other then that it seems that Woodcraft is my best bet. I am looking at something in the $75 range, so the Forrest is a bit pricey for me. I liked the look of this one:
http://tinyurl.com/3yygjty
Any opinions?
-Jim
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Yup, great value. In a proper table saw, you won't need a jointer.
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Wow, that was quick. Which one are you referring to?
Jim
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The Freud Glueline Rip. Ripping is a whole different blade issue and only ripping blades rip. Combo blades make a poor second choice.
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That Ridgid blade you linked to won't rip... it will just burn....well you probably will get through some wood..but.
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Thank you. Tell me, what is the difference between a "glue line" rip blade and just a rip blade? Just the quality of the cut? And what happens if you just leave this in your saw and do occasional cross cuts with it. I mean I generally use my Mitre saw for that but when I do fine mitre cuts on boxes and things I like to use the table saw.
I appreciate the quick input.
-Jim
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Of course a rip blade will cross cut, but the finish will suck and tear-out a real problem. It is also hard on the blade.
My hunch would be that a ripping blade is a lot better at cross cutting than a finishing/crosscutting blade would be at ripping. Makita included, what looked like, a combination blade with the LS1013 SCMS. That ended up in my table saw and was pretty good at doing every- day work. Surprisingly good considering there were no raker teeth.
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On 8/18/2010 3:32 PM, jtpr wrote:

"GlueLine Rip" is simply a marketing term and has no technical reference merit.
That said, I own a Freud "GlueLine Rip", but a regular kerf, and it does everything its marketing term suggests.
An excellent ripping blade for the price.
It will do crosscuts, but slower and not optimum cuts. If you're serious about woodworking you really need to use the right tool for the job.
On that same note, unless you're just seriously underpowered on your table saw, I feel a thicker blade makes for a more stable blade, with less vibration, and particularly when ripping hardwoods, so I forego the thin kerf variety when ripping for my own use.
As always, YMMV ...
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I have Rigid 3650, so not really underpowered (for what I do), but not a 3hp either.
I agree with the right tool statement. But if I'm doing a one-off project with a few crosscuts, some mitre's and rips, do you really change your blade each time? However, if I was doing something where I could do all the cross cuts first, then the rips I could see it.
Maybe I need a second table saw...;+}
-Jim
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jtpr wrote:
I have Rigid 3650, so not really underpowered (for what I do), but not a 3hp either.
I agree with the right tool statement. But if I'm doing a one-off project with a few crosscuts, some mitre's and rips, do you really change your blade each time? However, if I was doing something where I could do all the cross cuts first, then the rips I could see it. ------------------------ I like the standard kerf, 24T, Freud for ripping.
Do all the rips first when prepping stock, then blade change won't be a PITA.
Lew
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I'm running a Freud Diablo blade in mine. It's a good blade and gives me smooth cuts in plywood and most everything else. It's a step up from the Irwin Marathon blade I was running in there (not a bad blade, but definately lower quality).

Make sure your second table saw is the same height as the first so it can be used as an outfeed table. ;-)
The only time I change my saw blade is to put the dado stack on. I've got two good saw blades, and two saws to run them in. The TS has the 60T "combination" blade, while the CMS has the cross cut blade.
Puckdropper
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It's a good blade and gives me

The glue in plywood dulls blades real fast. I keep a fresh big box blade around for all my unimportant ply cuts.
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On Wed, 18 Aug 2010 21:28:44 +0000, Puckdropper wrote:

I got extravagant and bought a Freud Fusion 10" last year. I don't see how any blade could do a better job. That said, if I had to do a *lot* of rough ripping at one time, I'd switch to a rip blade just to save my Fusion for the cuts that count.
I've got a thin kerf Freud LU something or other that I've used for ripping for several years. Does OK.
For plywood I use a cheap blade from Lowes or HD and replace it after each large project.
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, do you really

I try to plan for doing things in order so I can use the appropriate blade but on any project I am looking for quality I always change to the cross cut for cross and miter cuts. It is more than just the smooth finish, you also get less chipping with a slower paced push.
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On 8/18/2010 4:07 PM, jtpr wrote:

The point is ... if I'm going to leave a blade on the saw for one-off's like your above, it would not be a rip blade, it would be a combination blade like the Forrest WWII.

Well, that's something we could all shoot for ... my second "table saw" is Festool TS-75 :)
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Or Makita SP6000K? <evil grinne> http://fwd4.me/a7A
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I have Rigid 3650, so not really underpowered (for what I do), but not a 3hp either.
I agree with the right tool statement. But if I'm doing a one-off project with a few crosscuts, some mitre's and rips, do you really change your blade each time? However, if I was doing something where I could do all the cross cuts first, then the rips I could see it.
Maybe I need a second table saw...;+}
-Jim
Naw, You need a table saw for rips and a radial arm saw for crosscuts and a miter saw for miters. [:-) I use the Freud LM74R010 blade on the table saw, the Freud P410 on the radial and the Freud LU91012 on the compound miter.
But I have used the P410 for ripping and it does a good job. It's a very good *combination* blade.
Max
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jtpr wrote:

I don't. The table saw has a rip blade and it is never changed. I forget the tooth count, no more than 40, probably less.
The cross cuts I do on it aren't great, bit rough and blows out the end, but I don't expect them to be and they *never* will be with a chisel tooth rip blade.

Not necessarily, I use my radial arm saw for them :)
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wrote:

As someone said here a few years back: "I don't change my blade until I can't see the wood through the smoke."
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If you are in production mode or do a lot of woodworking then by all means have a saw for each task. For the rest of us a few compromises are in order. For me that means that a decent combo blade stays in my saw and does everything unless I have a pretty big rip or crosscut job to get done.Although I have a Forrest WWII, I usually have my Frued TK906 in the saw. If I am doing some serious ripping, either in volume or in thickness, I switch to a rip blade and the one you show is pretty decent. If I am doing a lot of fine cross cuts or working in good plywood I switch to an appropriate dedicated blade. From your description, you need a good combo blade. There are tons of opinions on here as to what is a good combo blade, so do a little research. If you like Frued, their site has some decent info, but beware that they have some good quality blades and some terribly crappy blades (i.e. any sold by Lowes) some look them up and order what you want. Amazon usually has decent prices on Frued blades.
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