Need a Cheap Nailer For Toe-Nailing

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I am looking for a nailer that I will use it for nothing but toe-nailing two pieces of woods together (as a way to clamp them together). I already have a set of nailers; but somehow I cannot use them for toe-nailing (the nail will stick out by 1/8" or more). Therefore, I need a nailer that can do toe-nailing.
Because it is a single purpose tool that I probably won't use often, I want it to cost very little. I am looking at the nailers from Harbor Freight, and they have some very low cost nailers (as low as $20). But I have no idea which one can do toe-nailer properly. Can someone tell me where I can find a low cost nailer that can do toe-nailer?
Thanks in advance for any suggestion.
Jay Chan
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Take one of the nailers that you already own. Adjust the depth-of-drive to countersink the nail. Use same for toe-nailing. Cost you just a bit of time and testing on some scrap lumber.
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This is odd. I have adjusted the depth of drive of my existing nailer to the max and I still cannot countersink the nail. The nailer is Senco that is supposed to be good.
Jay Chan
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On the Senco I used to have, the adjustment is done by changing the length of the ram. Assuming you have enough pressure, that's all that's left. It's a very simple mechanism.
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OK. I will try my Senco nailer one more time. But I am not hopeful.
I cannot rule out the possibility that I might have read the instruction wrong. When I just bought the nailer, I was quite confused by the instruction manual when I tried to load nails into the nailer. I would not be surprised that I might have misunderstood the instruction on adjusting depth-of-drive. On the other hand, the mechanism in adjusting the depth-of-drive in that nailer is seemingly quite simple: just turning a hand screw. How would I get this wrong anyway? I don't know.
I am leaning toward the belief that the safety mechanism may have keep the nailer head too far from the surface of the wood and may prevent the nailer from countersinking the nail. That is the reason why I want to know if another nailer may help.
Jay Chan
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(I wrote, but you deleted the attribution for, )

You have the owners manual, right? If not, it's on Senco's website in PDF format.

Dunno, if you gave the model number I missed it.

See what Senco's website has to say before you spend more money. Or, call their support folks. It's a quality product, they'll take care of you and help you if you can be helped.
Dave Hinz
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I have to increase PSI 10-15lbs to toe nail with my Porter Cable framer. I agree with the consensus that the Senco should be able to be tweaked into proper performance. Good Luck!
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Unfortunately, the small air compression that comes with the Senco brad nailer cannot go over 120 PSI. Even I max out the outlet air pressure, I still can only get up to 120 PSI. I am wondering if the restriction on air pressure may be the reason why I cannot toe-nail properly. What's the PSI that you need to set in order to toe-nail properly with a brad nailer (if you have done something like that)? Thanks.
Jay Chan
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On 7 Dec 2005 19:40:57 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com quickly quoth:

Jay, what wood are length of brad are you shooting into/with? If it's not Lignum Vitae, perhaps your Senco is toast or you have an air feed problem.
======================================================== The Titanic. The Hindenburg. + http://www.diversify.com The Clintons. + Website & Graphic Design ========================================================
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Am I missing something? I thought I have put the original quote on the message.

Yes, I have the owner manual. But it is a one manual for multiple models kind of thing, and it is not clear.

This is a good idea. I should contact their tech support to see if they can help me with this.
Thanks.
Jay Chan
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Yeah, but just like on this one, the "Dave Hinz wrote..." line isn't there. It just makes things easier to follow if you leave those in.

See if there's a newer one online. Keep in mind there's also parts manuals which are different than user manuals for Senco.

There ya go. Nice thing about buying top-notch stuff is that that's an option.
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Dave Hinz wrote:

Now I see. I didn't realize the significance of leaving the original message sender name in the message.
Jay Chan
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On 7 Dec 2005 09:57:40 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com quickly quoth:

Possible solutions:
1) Use a shorter nail or 2) Adjust the air pressure up or 3) Clean and re-oil the thing so it works properly. or 4) All of the above.
Even my $15 Harbor Fright nailer and $24 HFT stapler will sink a staple or brad head beneath the surface.
======================================================== The Titanic. The Hindenburg. + http://www.diversify.com The Clintons. + Website & Graphic Design ========================================================
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Larry Jaques wrote:

I am currently working on the assumption that the air compressor is not up to the task. The small air compression that comes with the Senco brad nailer automatically cut off at 120 PSI and cannot be adjusted upward. I am wondering if a higher PSI would make a difference. May I ask you what is the PSI of the regulator in your air compressor when you successfully toe nail using a brad nail?

Yes, my Senco is also able to counter sink a nail -- when it is _not_ toe-nailing.
Jay Chan
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On 7 Dec 2005 19:47:48 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com quickly quoth:

I don't toenail, I screw SPF framing members together when possible. <g>
Most guns want 90psi max, too, so I doubt it's your pressure. Check your volume to the gun, though. Is it worse with rapid-fire? That would indicate a feed volume problem. Have you rebuilt the Senco yet? Pulling it down and cleaning it can make a big difference in an air tool. Sometimes pieces of debris (specifically teflon tape) get in the inlet and ruin performance. (Gummed vanes in rotary tools cause the same performance hit.)

Could it be your method? Watch your hand while you hit the trigger for a toenailing shot. If it moves, try holding it perfectly still. This is especially critical with longer nails. What length are you shooting? It's possible that the gun you're using isn't up to the task for that length nail and the type of wood you're using.
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If it is not the adjustment of your Senco. Just buy one of those Bostich staple/nail guns. Basically a more expensive staple gun. Their at Lowes and Home Depot. Just be warned if you go to Home Depot and hear someone over a bull horn say "PUT DOWN THE PENCIL AND BACK AWAY" just run and don't go back.
Roy
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ROYNEU wrote:

?? What does this mean ??
Jay Chan
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It's poking fun at Home Depot for the way they handle theft. Maybe you didn't hear about the guy who put a pencil in his pocket by mistake. Was run in for stealing, etc. There was an extensive thread here about it, too.
Roy
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ROYNEU wrote:

Honestly, I have never heard anything like that while I am in Home Depot, and I visit Home Depot very frequent -- and not always in the Tools Department :)
Jay Chan
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Exactly what type of nailer (framing, finishing or brad) are you using? I own nearly the full line of Senco nailers and have no problems with toenailing, however it does require holding the gun FIRMLY against the board your nailing into. If the gun is not held firmly enough, often the gun will bounce when it is fired causing the nail to stick out. Also, the "angle of attack" may influence how the nail is set. 45-60 degrees or so seems to wok best with my guns. --dave

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