My Workshop Prep. Project

Some of you may remember filling the mind of a then young-minded aspiring-workshop builder with grandiose ideals a few years ago. Well, only a few short years later, I'm practically ready to prime and paintthe following:
--painted (lightly) mudded ceilings (w/some light stains from welding left by preoccupant) --new (drywall) walls --existing painted wall has lots of fresh repairs
Home Depot recommended (perhaps, of course) their Behr Premium Primer for everything. "Interior" primer and paint. I would use the version w/"stain blocking" on the ceiling. Workshop has the form of an attached 2-car garage in central Indiana.
Any feelings here whether this product ought to be suitable (then I would use Behr ceiling flat white on the ceiling and eggshell on the walls).
The salesman made made a statement that seemed to me to be a little silly: That "we recommend Behr paint go on top of Behr primer."
I did not tell him I was trying to save money. In fact, when I was mentioning Kilz and Zinszer, he said "I can save you a few bucks" and he advised me as indicated.
Was I given good advice? Anything you would you do different (and why?)
Iam off to fine-tune my drywall work and driver a few nails or screws a little deeper (so I don't see the edges of their heads glistening at me...)
Cheers, Bill
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On Wed, 12 Jun 2013 21:34:30 -0400, Bill wrote:

I would say it would depend on how persistent the stain is. If it is a stain that continues to come through, then I would go with the best blocker. I won't make a recommendation because I have not run up against this problem. If you know of any painters in the area they might be a good source to check on those recommendations.
Paul T.
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On Wednesday, June 12, 2013 9:15:09 PM UTC-5, PHT wrote:

.... then find the source of what's making the stain and stop/fix/remove whatever is causing it. If the drywall has been stained (wet with something?) so much, that the drywall has weakened, then replace that section of drywall.
The stain blocking aspect is shellac. Use whatever primer has the most shellac. I vote Zinsser Bulls Eye 123. If in doubt about the stained area(s), apply 2 coats on that/those spots.
Sonny
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Sonny wrote:

whatever is causing it. If the drywall has been stained (wet with something?) so much, that the drywall has weakened, then replace that section of drywall.

shellac. I vote Zinsser Bulls Eye 123. If in doubt about the stained area(s), apply 2 coats on that/those spots.

The "stain" I am referring to is really just "soot". I'll try the Behr primer, and if I am not satisfied with the result I'll put Zinsser on top of it. This area is not even 20% of the ceiling. I just thought it would be nice if it looked clean after I'm finished. The end of this part of the project, at least, is in sight. The rule about a project taking "at least twice as long as you expect it to" definitely holds for me in this case. If I could start again from the beginning, I would be a lot faster! : ) I think I took down my first taped joint twice. Sometime after that I learned to wet the tape and mytaping results improved considerably.
Bill
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On Wednesday, June 12, 2013 11:04:23 PM UTC-5, Bill wrote:

eginning, I would be a lot faster! : )
My woodshop remodel is in its 5th year. I only do the remodeling when I fe el like it, otherwise, I work on projects or sit & drink beer and look at w hat remodeling needs to be done, next, maybe.
Actually, I recently bought shingles, siding, etc, for finishing replacing the old roof and some ext. siding. I recently finished stripping and repai nting a set of wood windows and installed them & the interior casings/facin gs.
Even my upholstery shop is not completed. Still have some interior trim to install and someday I'll install new flooring.

improved considerably.
With the first mud coating, before applying your tape, make sure you apply the mud deep into the seams, between the drywall panels. You don't want an y air pockets between those panels, under your tape, or your tape may bubbl e up when wet or become loosened, later, after it dries. Fill all those vo ids, in the drywall, with mud, when taping.... Same with the wall-wall & wa ll-ceiling corners, fill those voids with mud (no air pockets), before tapi ng.
Sonny
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Sonny wrote:

fill (deep) ALL of my drywall gaps with Durabond-90, and let it dry, before I taped the seems--I created no more air pockets after that. This also gave me a larger tolerance when cutting and fitting the drywall. 1/4" gaps no longer a problem.
Bill

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Sonny wrote:

definitely holds for me in this case. If I could start again from the beginning, I would be a lot faster! : )

like it, otherwise, I work on projects or sit & drink beer and look at what remodeling needs to be done, next, maybe. I don't need any help learning how to drag the process out. I've learned how to do that on my own! ; )

old roof and some ext. siding. I recently finished stripping and repainting a set of wood windows and installed them & the interior casings/facings.

mud deep into the seams, between the drywall panels. You don't want any air pockets between those panels, under your tape, or your tape may bubble up when wet or become loosened, later, after it dries. Fill all those voids, in the drywall, with mud, when taping.... Same with the wall-wall & wall-ceiling corners, fill those voids with mud (no air pockets), before taping.

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Whatever you use will work out fine. If it were me, I'd...
1. mud in the holes after punching in the nails
2. prime everything with Zinsser 1-2-3
3. paint the walls white - or at least a light color - with a glossy paint (saw dust brushes off more easily).
dadiOH
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On Wed, 12 Jun 2013 21:34:30 -0400, Bill wrote:

Two reasons, good light reflection and the ceiling would be much easier to keep clean. Flat ceiling paint is a bitch to clean anything off of.
basilisk
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basilisk wrote:

sense to use eggshell on the ceiling because "it's easier to keep clean"? It's stipple, so I assume the only realistic way to clean it is with air pressure (or a vacuum--which probably won't happen much). Or does the fact that it's stipple, make this a moot point?
Bill
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On Thu, 13 Jun 2013 11:23:52 -0400, Bill wrote:

My condolences :)
basilisk
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Does anyone else think it makes

Final coat on ceiling of zinz 123 stain blocker, and walls too. Reason, like someone else mentioned, it is a bit glossy and dust and other stains are easy to clean off. Yes, I used it on a popcorn ceiling, even, durable for the past 20 years, and looks good.
Jim in NC
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Morgans wrote:

2 coats of Zins 123, huh? How does it look compared to paint? Not as bright? I'm considering using it as a primer at least since everyone raves about it. Ihaven't heard anyone rave about Behr primer yet! ; ) The salesman at HomeDepot sure was determined that I should use Behr primer though--especially with the Behr paint!
Bill
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Bill wrote:

I did a bit of reading, and the only concerns I saw about using Zins 123 as a "top coat" were about even-ness of coverage and flashing. I'll apply it and see what I think.
Bill
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Even covering depends upon the applicator (you). I don't know what "flashing" is so can't comment.
You asked how it looked compared to paint. It IS paint. All primers are. Their primary difference is that they have a lot more calcium carbonate in them which makes them somewhat softer. In the case of oil base primers, they also have more oil, same effect.
Zinsser 1-2-3 is water base. It goes on easy, cleans up easy. It can be tinted just like any other paint. (When I plan to topcoat it I usually have it tinted lightly to aid in getting full coverage with the top coats). Out of the can, it dries to a nice white with a slight sheen. IMO, it is fine as a final paint for ceilings,
dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

The "flashing" referred to such things as overlapping roller strokes being more visible than they might be with a finish designed as a top coat.
I thought the primer was designed to dry harder--so that the latex paint would have a strong surface to adhere to. I read a story about latex paint, with no primer, pulling "popcorn" off of a ceiling.
Bill

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"Bill" wrote:

Had a friend who just went thru this and it was a total PITA to get ceilings sealed and stop bleed thru. Finally got Zinszer to seal.
I just finished sealing a piece of ply with wet Doug fir stiffeners using Zinszer oil based sealer.
It was the only oil based product on the shelf and did a great job.
Based on my experience, I'd use the Zinszer oil base sealer and get the job done right the first time.
BTW, Home Depot sold it in quart cans for about $10/quart which covered about 30 square feet.
Lew
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Bill wrote:

Regarding "electrical shims (i.e. recepatacle shims)". How far does the box need to be below the drywall surface before these are necessary (1/16" ?) Actually, in this case I am thinking that in that case the device screws may pull the plastic box to the surface.
I know that the the boxes are not allowed to be more than 1/4" deep--and my results are much better than that.
I have one box which is "proud" (3/32"), and I am going to deal with it presently!
Cheers, Bill
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