Miter saw Stand

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"Bill" wrote in message
Do you think this (see link below) is a reasonable miter saw stand (Masterforce MX124),or should I insist on crafting something myself? FWIW, I collected anew Delta DW713saw, so far untested! :)I did get in some shop time this weekend, but on an unrelated repair.
http://www.menards.com/main/tools-hardware/power-tools/work-support/masterforce-universal-miter-saw-work-station/p-1846173-c-10164.htm
The main issueI see with making my own is my lack of a jointer. Another option is to mount the saw on a table (or saw horses) and use a roller stand (I've seen pictures of that being done, but it looksrisky). It's not like I'm planning to build a deck or anythinglike that--more like, "clamp stand" and "plant table". =====================================================================================I have my miter saw on a portable stand so I can take it were the work is. It also has the added advantage that it can be collapsed and stood against a wall. I have seen the permanent stands that people make and they are great for shop use but portable they aren't. . I have been working with wood, off and on, for over 40 years and have never had the need for a jointer so if you feel the need to build something, the lack of a jointer is not a problem.
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Bill wrote:

http://www.menards.com/main/tools-hardware/power-tools/work-support/masterforce-universal-miter-saw-work-station/p-1846173-c-10164.htm

Mine sits on a dropped section of my wall cabinet so that the saw table is level with the rest of the cabinet. Also has a dust extractor hose attached and a wall mounted spotlight on the cutting area. I don't do house calls or construction work.
--
 GW Ross 

 Phobia: what's left after drinking 2 
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G. Ross wrote:

Wall cabinet is a poor choice of words. It is a table/cabinet which is attached to the wall.
--
 GW Ross 

 Phobia: what's left after drinking 2 
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Before there were CSMSs, I bought Delta's Sawbuck, with the solid table - https://www.google.com/search?q lta+sawbuck&hl=en&rlz=1T4MXGB_enUS5 12US513&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=oPpGUfeoJtG74APuvoDYDA &ved DEQsAQ&biw80&bihi0
It easily goes anywhere for all sorts of tasks, so mobility is a great asse t. The circular saw limits work to smaller cuttings (16" wide, 2 3/4" thic k for straight cuts, much wider but less thick for angle cuts), but it sure ly takes care of 90% of my miter and other cutting tasks that "require" thi s type of saw. For larger cuttings, I have Delta's 33-890 RAS.
Whether you buy a stand or make one, make sure it is stable, though it shou ldn't take much to insure its stability, an adequatley wide footprint. You r CSMS is likely a little heavier than my sawbuck, but establishing the req uired stability shouldn't take much doing.
It's easy to buy a stand, rather than making one. Steel or aluminum frame? Aluminum should do very well, as hospital/patient gurneys are made with a luminum frames and can handle lots of weight, which prompts me to suggest, if convenient for you....
*It's not uncommon for me to look for a recycle solution, for my own needs, sometimes, so....
Maybe, check out your local hospital and/or ambulance service for a broken gurney (for free?) and use it to make a portable stand. The wheels are tou gh and dependable, also. This sort of thing is easier for me, since I have a close history with the local hospitals, here, but if convenient and maki ng your own stand is practical for you, check them out for an available gur ney.
Facilities can't afford the liability of using a broken gurney, so they jus t throw them away. One hospital, here, does keep the wheels from damaged g urneys, for replacing on other gurneys, when needed, so a salvvaged gurney may not have wheels.
Most gurneys have collapseable mechanisms and this can possibly be modified /adapted to accommodate foldup, for transport of your CSMS work station.
Maybe even Salvation Army or Goodwill will have a gurney available for chea p.
I have several furniture carts, for my upholstery transport work, made from free salvaged gurneys.
Sonny
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On 3/18/2013 8:39 AM, Sonny wrote:

https://www.google.com/search?q lta+sawbuck&hl=en&rlz=1T4MXGB_enUS512US513&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=oPpGUfeoJtG74APuvoDYDA&ved DEQsAQ&biw80&bihi0

The circular saw limits work to smaller cuttings (16" wide, 2 3/4" thick for straight cuts, much wider but less thick for angle cuts), but it surely takes care of 90% of my miter and other cutting tasks that "require" this type of saw. For larger cuttings, I have Delta's 33-890 RAS.

shouldn't take much to insure its stability, an adequatley wide footprint. Your CSMS is likely a little heavier than my sawbuck, but establishing the required stability shouldn't take much doing.

Aluminum should do very well, as hospital/patient gurneys are made with aluminum frames and can handle lots of weight, which prompts me to suggest, if convenient for you....

gurney (for free?) and use it to make a portable stand. The wheels are tough and dependable, also. This sort of thing is easier for me, since I have a close history with the local hospitals, here, but if convenient and making your own stand is practical for you, check them out for an available gurney.

throw them away. One hospital, here, does keep the wheels from damaged gurneys, for replacing on other gurneys, when needed, so a salvvaged gurney may not have wheels.

Thank you, Sonny. As of this morning I AM leaning towards a stand which will give me "repeatable cuts"--at least in the long term. In the short term, I can surely do fine with another configuration.
This distinction, was a useful concept, at least for me, that came out of this thread.
Bill
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On 3/18/2013 7:39 AM, Sonny wrote:

https://www.google.com/search?q lta+sawbuck&hl=en&rlz=1T4MXGB_enUS512US513&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=oPpGUfeoJtG74APuvoDYDA&ved DEQsAQ&biw80&bihi0
Had one of those 30 years ago when I was building recording studios ... it was great.
--
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$64,,, 71 lbs of twisted steel & sex appeal ;-)
http://www.harborfreight.com/mobile-folding-power-tool-stand-40612.html
nuff said....
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On Monday, March 18, 2013 8:29:05 AM UTC-6, Spalted Walt wrote:

com/mobile-folding-power-tool-stand-40612.html nuff said....
Product depth 22" and 37 3/4" high. Does this mean its table top is 22" f ront to back? If so, then the leg span, front to back, is 20" or less. Th at might be iffy for stability, with Bill's saw's weight and any beefy lumb er, as high as it will be. A couple of the reviews said it was wobbly, but didn't say why.
The leg span of my sawbuck, front to back, is 25", table top is 35 3/4" hig h. I've never had any stability issues.

LOL.
Temporary stand? Several half-lap jointed 2X4s in a narrower-at-the-top "H -A" frame assembly (wide front-to-back footprint), X2, then heavy-duty hing ed to each end of a table top's frame, makes for an inexpensively made stan d. Install leg extension stops. Optional: A few wheels on an axle makes f or the mobility.
Sonny
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