MDF ok for rail and stiles?

Page 2 of 3  


Spend the extra $25 and get the poplar. Easy choice, IMO.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bf wrote:

As much as I like MDF for certain uses, the poplar will be much more enjoyable to work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Except that the yield from 2 sheets of MDF is 64 ft vs. 30 for the poplar. The poplar would cost in excess of $150 for the equivalent amount.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I didn't even bother to check the math.. Still, if it's a project for me, I'd spend the extra money, although I understand the money difference is now more significant. It's also worth considering the health risk of MDF. Yes, I know that can be managed with proper respitory protection, but since my shop is in the basement, I prefer to minimize the amount of MDF and treated wood cutting that I do down there.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
the MDF is for the panels and the poplar for the rails and stiles. If all poplar its probably 150?
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I priced the MDF doors at size (8 doors 22x42)......Holy Cr.....p!!! It was only $114. No way I could buy the material to make my own for that little. The shipping was another $60 though. Thats galling. I might consider replacing many more doors to get the shipping to a decent ratio since the shipping is fixed.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That's what a big old honking CNC machine can do to a sheet of MDF. I saw one at the IWF make 12 doors in 12 minutes.
I mean really pretty doors with a LOT of detail.
I was told that the machine was NOT running at max speed for safety reasons in the exhibit hall.
trs80 wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Be prepared to offload the goods out at the street or pay an exorbitant "lift" charge and that will most likely still be curbside. I forget the trucking outfit but the lift charge when I used Lakeside was $0.50 or $0.57/lb. MDF is damned heavy (96 lbs. per 4 X 8 X 3/4 sheet.
--
Dave in Houston



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
good tip. Offloading on the street is fine for me.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"N Hurst" wrote in message

Be aware that not all mdf is created equally, and certainly a top quality, and sharp, router bit would be required.
I would look for a "mill" near you that supplies trim to the building industry and see if they can either supply you with top quality mdf, or tell you where they get theirs.
If you were in the Houston area, I would recommend The Detering Co, on Washington avenue. Strictly as a go by, here is their website as an illustration of what kind of company you would be looking for in your area:
http://www.detering.com /
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 1/27/07
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yup, got a couple on speed dial. I hardly ever bother making doors any more. I e-mail the style number and size..to the verifiable millimetre, and wait 10 days. I can even get them pre-finished to my exact requirement. Most importantly, at a price which I can't even begin to touch.
I walk in with one of Caron's incredible brochures, and out come the cheque-books.
http://www.caronind.com /
These guys have taken the 'going green' to a new level. Fabulous people.
For a lower cost MDF-style product:
http://www.cabinetmart.com/cat-doors.html right in my back yard.
Both of these guys will ship to USA and beyond. (Shameless plugs)
r
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
N Hurst wrote:

Seal the cut edge with glue size, drywall compound, or shellac before you sand it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Automotive glazing putty (laquer based) is nice and quick. Cheap and tough too. A wee bit harder to sand..but quite workable. Ready to go in a tube.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The trick is to stabilize the " fuzzies". After cutting and or routing apply a primer or shellac and then lightly sand to smooth the surface.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
message

Thanks for all the replies, everyone! Next time I need to work with MDF I'll try out your suggestions.
-Nathan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
message

Thanks for all the replies, everyone! Next time I need to work with MDF I'll try out your suggestions.
-Nathan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
thats a good idea. but I dont like the look of the rounded corners.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Best template material out there.

The
on
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CW wrote:

It really is!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use sheets of 1/2" for all my accurate templating. Undermount sink cut-outs need to be pretty close if you plan to mate it with a $1000.00 (+) Franke sink. They are re-usable
The cheaper under-mount sinks vary so much in size that making a template for each installation is in many cases a must.
When undermounting in laminate tops, tolerances get real goofy. MDF rules!
http://www.topworks.ca/counter-seal%20images/countersealshot.gif
r
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.