Making your own wood putty with hide glue?


I have tried glue, shellac, and varnish. Shellac seems best, but it still isn't right. I just read that hide glue is the right material. Because it is all protein, it takes finishs almost the same as wood. Anyone tried it?
How about liquid hide glue... is that a decent product?
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I have used hide glue and sawdust from the project for filler for years, but you do have to go to the trouble of making hot glue. Liquid hide glue is next to worthless. Also, learn how to use shellac sticks and a burn-in knife. It is an art well worth learning. Bugs
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Bugs wrote:

Interesting. I've used liquid hide glue on several projects and never had any problems. Yes, it's weaker than heated hide glue, but nowhere near the "useless" range. I did look up the numbers at one time, but I don't have them now - DAGS.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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Bugs wrote:

Interesting. The Titebond liquid hide glue is rated for 3591psi, vs 3750 for Titebond2. Seems fairly respectable to me...
Chris
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I am wondering if in context of the original post, Bugs meant that it was worthless for filler/filling. I didn't see that he slandered hide glues adhesive/holding properties.
I don't really think he meant that liquid hide glue was worthless for anything; just reference to the question about filler.
Robert
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I wonder how good a glue has to be to hold saw dust in nail holes and cracks.
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Hot, fresh hide glue makes a joint stronger than the wood itself. If you test break a joint the wood will tear out before the glue fails. It's the only thing to use for violin work as the glue crystalizes when it sets, giving the instrument resonance. Ordinary wood glues remain plastic and tend to damp out the vibrations in the instrument. Bugs
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I've never heard that as the reason for hide glue use in stringed instruments. While it may be true, the primary reason for the use as I've been told (from the violin making and repair forum) is that it is reversable whereas most glues with equal strength are not. more often than not during the life of a wooden stringed instrument repairs have to be made and you can remove parts without damage by heating the glue areas to do the repair and then replace the removed component.
I recently did some extensive repairs to an upright bass using hide glue for the repairs. Advice from the above mentioned forum and some from this one helped me greatly.
Frank
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