Machinist's Dye?

Page 1 of 2  
I know we have a few pro machinists here.
What kind of store would sell marking out dye "Dyekem?", used for machining metal?
I live near a NAPA distribution center that usually has everything, and the counter guys looked at me like I had two heads. I can't seem to find it in my Grainger catalog.
I'm not having much luck with Google, so even a brand name would help.
Thanks!
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would stop by a machine shop and ask the machinist where to get it.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It might help a whole bunch to tell us where you live. I purchase it at K&P Industrial Supply that specializes in machine tool bits and supplies. Look in your yellow pages for machine shop, make a cold call and ask them where they get it. Grainger has it: <http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/itemDetailsRender.shtml?xi=xi&ItemId11574184&ccitem=>
--
______________________________
Keep the whole world singing . . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Highland Woodworking does, too, if you don't mind spending a little extra for the Starrett name on the bottle. http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID ™0
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bonehenge (B A R R Y) wrote:

"Layout fluid" is how Grainger indexes it.
"http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/2C945"
MikeB
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But, seriously folks:
Try these links, too
http://www.precisionbrand.com/products/default.asp?p_catid 
http://www.freemansupply.com/DykemBlueLayoutFlu.htm
http://www.freemansupply.com/SprayonBlueLayoutF.htm
http://www.kpg-industrial.com/products/blue_layout_fluid /
http://www.houseoftools.com/product.htm?pid 0776
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 23 Nov 2007 17:04:01 -0500, "Bonehenge (B A R R Y)"

http://www.mcmaster.com/ layout dye
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What bq340 said. Won't chip or flake. A nice crisp line. Red or blue. MSC also has it.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 23 Nov 2007 17:04:01 -0500, "Bonehenge (B A R R Y)"

Thanks guys!
Get this...
In last night's mail (yeah, my mail comes at night, 'nuther thread!) I got the latest Highland Woodworking catalog. Highland carries Starrett dye! This might be new, as I don't remember seeing it there before.
Thanks again for the replies.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've seen it in the store for a long time, but it might not hvae been in the catalog until recently.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I use both red and blue layout dye, but you can use a felt tip marker just as well. If you are going to use the dye for scribing lines, etc., then that is what you need. But, if you are using it to test a fit or to test flatness, you need "High Spot Blue" which is a blue paste that comes in a little tube, like toothpaste. MSC has that. I have often wondered why one couldn't just get a tube of prussian blue oil paint, instead.
Not a pro machinist, Pete Stanaitis
Bonehenge (B A R R Y) wrote:

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
spaco wrote:

We use a big chisel-point sharpie for casual layout scribing all the time in the shop -- it's handier, neater and dries faster than the layout blue. But the official stuff is tougher, stays visible even as it gets hot while grinding to the line and so is still used quite often.
And yes, artist's oil Prussian blue is not only usable for high-spot marking but is often preferred by machinists claiming that some brands have more pigment.
--
Ron Hock
HOCK TOOLS www.hocktools.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 24 Nov 2007 10:02:12 -0800, Ron Hock

That's even easier to find.
I want it to mark high spots, and there's an artist's supply store right down the street.
Thanks again, all!
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bonehenge (B A R R Y) wrote:

Just a comment but dentists get it on prepared plastic film, used to check bite when they're doing fillings. Don't know what it costs or where they get it, but next time you go it might be worthwhile asking.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I've been a machinist for 38 years and never heard of using artist's Prussian blue. Not that it wouldn't work, but it will dry. Just never heard of it. And always had 'regular" PB. I guess it depends on what part of the country your from.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rick Samuel wrote:

Uh, I didn't write any of that.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sat, Nov 24, 2007, 10:02am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@www.hocktools.com (Ron Hock) first did scribe:; spaco wrote: <snip> I have often wondered why one couldn't just get a tube of prussian blue oil paint, instead. Then did also scribe:: <snip> And yes, artist's oil Prussian blue is not only usable for high-spot marking but is often preferred by machinists claiming that some brands have more pigment.
My old man was a tool maker. I never heard him mention "anything" besides Prussian Blue for laying out, etc. Apparently it was the standard back then. Probably cheap, available, and worked. I'd been wonddering if anyone was gonna mention it. I'm with you tho, I think markers are the way to go - they're even available in the corner grocery store, in various colors, tip styles, mark on about anything, are inexpensive, and work.
JOAT You'll never get anywhere if you believe what you "hear". What do you "know"?. - Granny Weatherwax
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J T wrote:

Prussian Blue is a pigment that can be used in paints, inks, and other carriers or as a dry powder by itself. Calling something "Prussian Blue" doesn't tell you a lot--in machine shop practice its used in oil for checking interferences and in alcohol for layout, and in art it may be used in other formulations. It's famous mainly because it was the first widely available colorfast blue pigment to become available, in the early 1800s.
Markers may be OK for showing scribed lines, but they aren't so good for showing interferences. And have you ever tried to get dried marker off of anodized aluminum?
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mon, Nov 26, 2007, 11:17am snipped-for-privacy@cox.net (J. Clarke) doth query: <snip> And have you ever tried to get dried marker off of anodized aluminum?
No problem. The magic stuff is called paint. LMAO As you may have guessed, I'm not much for fancy. But, in real-life, if I actually was to mark on anodized aluminum, and wanted to protect the finish, I'd probably use masking tape, and mark on that. More likely, I'd never have any in the first place.
JOAT You'll never get anywhere if you believe what you "hear". What do you "know"?. - Granny Weatherwax
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.