Low Noise saw (any saw ;)...)

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Well, David, you have to cut it with something. If you can't do it with a power saw because it's too noisy, then you have to do it with a handsaw. Might not be the way you'd like to see it done, and it may not be easy, but a saw is a saw. Sure, it'll wear out the blade, but that's true of the power saw blades as well. Either way, the flooring has to be cut, right? FWIW, I have cut laminate flooring with a dozuki, and continued to use it long after that project, until I cut a nail in half with it by mistake and broke a bunch of teeth. Yes, I did cut the nail in half- it's not hyperbole. Not the suggested use for that tool, but even the cheap ones are tougher than you may think.
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Prometheus wrote:

makes me cringe each time I bring the blade down on my carbide blade-equipped CMS. I'm still mulling over my options for cutting the already-installed flooring for some new cabinets. I've got a carbide blade for my 6-1/2" circular saw, but that will only do the long straight runs. I'll need another tool to cut into the corners and up against walls. Any ideas?
Dave
Dave
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David wrote:

Router w/ uptwist bit and upper bearing guide if need really good finish edge--otherwise, just hog it out and use the shoe mould to cover it up...
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David wrote:

The same guy who used to go arouns to the woodworkign shows and sell the drill bits that drill through files etc, sold reciprocating saw blades (sawzall and saber saw) that were edged with silicon carbide abrasive. If you can find one of those or the equivalent, they might do the job. You could make a handle for one of those to make a pad saw for getting into really tight places.
Does that company have an online presence?
--

FF


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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

Sawzall is over an inch long, which would have me cutting well through the floor as well as the laminate.
Is there a jig-saw-like tool that cuts flush and has a carbide edged bit available?? I could limit it's cutting depth by covering the laminate with a block of wood and the stroke of a jigsaw should be a lot less than my Sawzall.
Dave
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fein multimaster.
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snipped-for-privacy@all.costs wrote:

thanks. I'll check it out. It might be worth what I'd expect would be a hefty admission price, like my Fein shop vac.
Dave
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wrote:

Not too bad. The midrange kit is about $239, IIRC. Woodcraft has them, as well as some of the better builder supply yards.
The carbide grout cutter tool is a life saver when, for example, a woodworker tiles a shower, and gets a little exhuberent with the thinset. Just to pick an entirely random for instance.
But it is one sweet tool.
Patriarch
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Pergo. It seemed to cut fine to me, but YMMV.
That's a sticky job you've got there... I don't know much about the Wilson Art flooring, but perhaps you could remove the trim and use a really cheap abrasive disc in a 4" angle grinder? That'd get you really close, and then you could knock out the rest with a sharp chisel (Use a cheap chisel, of course)
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Prometheus wrote:

lots of RPM). I'll try it on some scrap laminate (and I could remove the trim...DUH! (light bulb moment!)...I will HAVE to cut the trim anyway, in order to install the wider cabinets.
(And here I was thinking I'd found the perfect excuse for a new tool...but that's ok...I still need another Veritas plane [or 2])
Dave
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wrote in message

I joined this thread late... If the OP marked his cuts fairly deep with a knife and then used a good sharp handsaw I don't see any reason for him to not get acceptable cuts for flooring. He'd probably do better than he would with a mediocre CMS and mediocre blade... If he's doing this at night and noise is a concern it doesn't sound like he's looking for production speed.
John
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Sharpening the saw every other cut would be a might bit slow.
news:F05Le.4691> I joined this thread late... If the OP marked his cutsfairly deep with a

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Unless it is wide board, then it would be after every cut.
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wrote in message

If you feel the finish is a concern than marking with the knife and then cutting a V-groove along the line (on the waste side) with the knife would eliminate the finish. The saw will track in the groove if some kind of saw guide is used (e.g., bench hook, 90 degree setting in a miter box, etc)...
John
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wrote:

Depends on what kind of production you're doing. As stated in my original post in this thread, I've done a whole pile of trim work with a dozuki and a coping saw, and it was all up to snuff. Which is to say, much nicer than 98% of the crap you see around you every day. There really, really is an arguement for hand tools being at least as, if not more, accurate than power tools in the hands of the right person. If you're lopping off crappy laminate to beat the next guy's lowest bid, then it's probably not worthwhile. If you're trying to make/maintain a reputation for quality over speed, then a handsaw will work beautifully. Especially when the job requires a special requirement, like the lowest amount of noise or dust possible, customers will often be willing to pay for real craftsmanship when it is availible. Also, a good dozuki will cut most trim (though I can't claim this for flooring, I imagine it it very similar) in 3-4 strokes- similar in time to lining up the cut on the power miter saw.
Further evidence of the race to the bottom, I guess. Get yourself a nice handsaw, Upscale, and give it a whirl- you may be surprised to find that they actually do work. And, though it may seem unlikely, they're sometimes faster than the power versions, as they don't require special setups or jigs for some cuts.
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Upscale wrote:

It looks like the fence on the LHS is set up for 90 degree trimming.
--
FF
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http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p2927&cat=1,42884 (standard) http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p2926&cat=1,42884 (professional)
BOTH of these should be able to produce square, smooth ends similar to a quality (power) chop saw. They have up to 32 tpi blades available. The work can be clamped on the "bed" of the saw. The saw is "captive" in the guides. Assuming that the saw is accurate and not defective (same assumption for any equipment), there is no reason these would not make quick, quits, accurate cuts. They *are* manual saws, and if you do much cutting, you will get tired and sweaty. You'll make more noise huffing and puffing than the saw will make.
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Way back when I was in eighth grade shop, we cut everyting on a miter box like the ones shown above. And we did nice precise cuts too. Everything was square. Our shop teacher was very particular about that. If the project wasn't square or had bad joints, out grades would suffer.
As for ripping, we had handsaws for that. We would cut close to a line. thenplane the board to the line. We did pretty good as a group of beginners.
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wrote in message

Lie-Nielson has a variety of back saws available now and will have panel saws in the not too distant future... I've got a couple L-N back saws (rip and cross-cut) and some Diston and Sandvik panel saws (again rip and various cross-cut). The Diston and Sandvik saws didn't come into their own until they had been sharpened. From the factory they cut OK but not nearly as good as after a professional sharpening.
John
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wrote:

Take a look at Lee Valley. (http://www.leevalley.com/) and the Japan Woodworker (http://www.japanwoodworker.com/page.asp?content_id (96) I hesitate to make a recommendation, as everyone has a slightly different preference, but each of these companies has good solid products that work well. For what you're up to, I'd use something like this (http://www.japanwoodworker.com/product.asp?s=JapanWoodworker&pf_id .117.02&dept_id085) Because I like cutting on the pull stroke, and the spine on the back of the saw will keep it ridgid when making straight cuts in a miter box. If you prefer the western-style saws, it's just a matter of finding one that works for you. I favor a gent's saw with a crosscut set over a dovetail saw (for instance) because of the handle style, but as stated above, that's going to depend on you.
A cheap pull saw from a local borg will work as well, but will not last nearly as long, and I've never seen one with a still brace on the back of the blade.
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