Looking for a good source for replacement motors

I'm looking to upgrade a motor on an older lathe and some other tools. I'm afraid I don't understand what the frame-types, numbers, compressor-rated, and other intricacies of electric motors are. And, what is a good brand, and where to buy? I don't want to spend a lot of money (who does), but I don't want to buy crap either. I'm looking for stuff in the 1-3 HP area, with standard belt drive and horizontal mounts.
tt
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WW.Grainger
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Test Tickle wrote:

Harbor Fright sells 1-3hp motors that are cheap and of "reasonable" quality.
Check their website.
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It seems that most of the motors that HF sells are compressor duty motors, which by defininition aren't meant for continuous operation. They're designed to run for a few minutes, then be off for a while. I had a 1.75HP 3-phase motor on a Delta DJ-20 that I wanted to replace with a single-phase one. Finding a motor was no problem. The problem was finding one for the price I wanted to pay. After a lot of looking, I ended up buying one from Farm and Fleet for about $129. It was a TEFC on a 56 frame (pretty standard) and was even made by the same company that made the original one (Marathon Electric). I think you need a TEFC motor (totally-enclosed fan-cooled) since it will be used in a dusty environment. Mine has a duty of 1.0, which is what I would look for.
todd
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Look at www.grainger.com for some information.
Frame size is an industry standard for mounting bolt and shaft size. A 48 frame has 1/2" shaft, 56 frame has a 5/8" shaft. C frame is a front mount. You can find much of this information on their web page.
Check with a local motor re-builder also. Some can get good prices or have used motors around that may suite your needs. Ed
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wrote:

Thanks alot. This solves the mystery of the frame numbers.
tt
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On Fri, 19 Sep 2003 19:22:14 GMT, Test Tickle

If it's going in a woodworking shop, look for a TEFC (totally-enclosed fan-cooled) motor. Worth paying the extra.
Frame sizes are pretty standard. If it's mounted on a normal-looking foot or a flange, then chances are that it's standard. A catalogue from any toolshop should list the dimensions. Apart from some obscure machine-specific motors, mounting problems are unusual.
Ratings are generally as a percentage duty cycle. Most motors (that you want to use) are rated for 100% duty, but they will have a lower power at this rating than at 60% duty. Work this out for yourself, depending on what you're going to drive with it. 100% rating isn't a bad idea on woodworking machines, but then you rarely need to run the machine under full load. OTOH, a compressor always runs "flat out", but most don't need to run continuously.
While you're working on the motor, look at the switchgear too. European practice is a NVR (no-volt release) switch as a minimum (a contactor and two pushbuttons) and E-stops, overload relays and lockable isolators may all be appropriate in some environments.

Don't forget S/H, especially if you have 3 phase to hand. Big 3-phase motors are often bargains.
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On Sat, 20 Sep 2003 00:36:12 +0100, Andy Dingley

Thanks for the great info.
tt
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Many of the motors that HF sells are US made. They're worth a look if there is a store near you. Another place is http://www.surpluscenter.com .

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A very good friend of mine has a machine shop and makes collectable knives for a living. He eats motors. I was surprised when he told me that he used to shop around and did the Grainger thing but now he only goes to Grizzly. Apparently they have a line of replacement motors. He just takes in the dead one to make sure that he gets the right one. We used to use the same electric motor repair shop, but now he says its cheaper or the same price to just get a new motor and it comes with a warrantee.

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That's what we do at work.
At one time we used a commercial rewind shop, but that proved to be slower and considerably more expensive than simply getting a new motor from any of a dozen or so vendors.
The only time we use the rewind shop these days is when we cannot get a new motor anywhere.
As for WWG, we found them to be a good bit more expensive than some of the other commercial suppliers.
Maybe try Johnstone Supply; they're national now, albeit wholesale only. Cheers, Fred McClellan the dash plumber at mindspring dot com
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The problem with buying from Grainger is they have a secret price list for big customers and make it up on the walk in's
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Grainger has published catalog prices. They do have discount schedules that apply to their larger volume customers also. Buy enough and you'll be able to negotiate a discount. Otherwise just order at catalog price...it's not a mystery and I've never seen any "make it up" pricing.
Phil
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I just put a replacement motor on an old Craftsman 10" table saw. I got the motor from Harbor Freight, and it's working just fine so far... Things to consider when buying a motor are:
1. input voltage (this one is 110/220) 2. direction of rotation (this one is reversible, Clockwise or counterclockwise) 3. Speed of rotation (this one is 3450 RPM, some are 1750) 4. Frame type (this is a 56, more or less the "standard" for woodworking tools if there is such a thing! 5. Power (this is a 1 hp, not the biggest you could use on a table saw, but no problems yet! 6. price ($59.99, plus a $5.95 "handling fee", but free shipping on orders over $50. BTW, that price is down $10 from the price *I* paid!
To see this item, go to www.harborfreight.com, and enter 40132 into the item number search.
I have no connections to Harbor Freight other than as a satisfied customer, hope this info helps!
On Fri, 19 Sep 2003 19:22:14 GMT, Test Tickle

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