Leveling a glue up

Hello,
I'm new to wood working and have just put together a couple of glue- ups for raised panels. A couple of the boards are sitting proud of the rest and I was wandering if I can use a planner to get them level since I don't have a belt sander or hand plane.
Thanks in advance for your help, V
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Of course you can. If it will fit in the planer, fire it up and plane it. That is the easiest way to get the job done if you don't have a drum sander.
Watch out you don't plane too much, or that you don't plane matching panels to the same thickness.
Robert
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V wrote:

If your panels will fit thru the panel, the answer is "yes"; however, be aware that you will probably need to clean up both sides.
If you are 1/16 proud on one side, you will be 1/16 low on the back side, thus if you need both sides clean, you will remove at least 1/8 minimum from the panel.
Lew
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Sure. Take light passes. In the future you can use biscuits to ensure that the boards will all be in the same plane. When clambing the boards together you can also use cauls (http://www.newwoodworker.com/cauls.html ) accross the boards
or alternatively use clamps on the ends to bring the joints into alignment. See here:
http://www.garagewoodworks.com/pictures/_MG_3893.jpg
--
Brian
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Garage_Woodworks wrote:

May I ask about your lumber storage system? I'm on the verge of doing something similar. Specifically...
1. Length of arms and how heavily you have been able to load them
2. How you attached arms to verticals. Through bolts?
3. How you attached the "auxiliary" verticals to both fixed verticals and arms
4. Spacing between arms. Have you found it to be too little? too much? about right?
5. "White wood" 2x4s? SYP? Other?
6. Any words of wisdom you care to impart
Thanks...
--

dadiOH
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Most of what you asked can be found on my web page here: (small pictures enlarge when clicked)
http://www.garagewoodworks.com/lumberstorage.htm
As far as how heavily I can load them, I have had it full of 4/4 cherry until it hits the upper shelf support arm.

19" long.

Yes.
Glued and screwed. Here is where I would change it. I would make the "auxiliary" verticals from 3/4" ply and cut them to make a triangle (with the 90 degree at the top)

Every other stud received a shelf support. Seems to be ok.

BORG 2X4.

Change the "auxiliary" verticals. I have noticed a very very small amount of shelf sag over time (minimal). This might be due to the auxiliary shelf support. I have found that this can be fixed by adding shims under the shelf.
Good luck.

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Garage_Woodworks wrote:

Thanks a bunch :)
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V wrote:

I see from other responses that you won't have a lot of trouble putting the panels through your planer.
I don't currently own a planer, so I use hand planes all the time for this kind of thing. If you're new to the hobby, you might want to consider getting a plane or two. Much easier to set up than the planer, and gives excellent results if they're sharp.
Understand, I'm not against a planer in any way. I just think that a few hand planes (especially a decent block plane) is indispensable in a wood shop. The block and a jack plane are good starts.
Ok, I've had my say there. The other side of the coin with hand planes is that they're worse than useless if not sharp. And I'd be remiss in recommending buying a plane or two without the sharpening equipment that goes with it. That gets you into more stuff to buy and more expense. There's a bit of a learning curve associated with sharpening as well.
If you're interested we can give you more information about what's involved. However, if the planer is all you think you need at the moment, you're still ok.
Just something to think about.
Tanus
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For a long time I've been wanting to use a hand plane, but not knowing the correct way to use or sharpen them... I'm embarrassed to say they scare me.
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Solution: http://www.drilldoctorstore.us/ws3000.html
Granted, a bit of extra expense, but it removes all the angst from sharpening hand plane blades up to 2" wide.
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V wrote:

Having a respect for any tool is a good thing, to tell the truth. But handplanes are truly pretty safe. And easy to use once you've played with them for a bit.
Swing's idea is a good one. I don't have that rig but I do have a water stone and a jig from Lee Valley that ensures my bevel is set correctly.
I have the stone and jig, but the WorkSharp sure looks attractive. If you can afford it, that can get you into planes, a decent set of chisels and a lot more tools that need sharpening in a hurry.
As I said in a previous post, sharpening has a learning curve, and i suspect that's still true with the WorkSharp. But so is everything else in the hobby.
If you do decide to get a plane, come back and ask questions here. There are plenty of people who use them and lots of them are more than willing to give some tips.
Tanus
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wrote:

For a long time I've been wanting to use a hand plane, but not knowing the correct way to use or sharpen them... I'm embarrassed to say they scare me.
Sometimes you can use a jack plane to get the panel a little closer to flat on one side *before* you run it through the planer. Sometimes you won't waste as much wood.(thickness) Tony
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On Fri, 20 Jun 2008 14:08:07 GMT, "Anthony Diodati" <mrbreezeet1NO

Is it safe to run a glue up through a planer? I've always been afraid to, thinking the glue lines will nick the planer knives.
-dickm
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dicko wrote: ...

For anything other than the hardest of epoxies, no problem. Do want to clean up excessive squeeze out first, of course.
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"dicko" wrote

One of the handiest tools to use beforehand is a disposable blade paint scraper. Use it to remove most of the glue squeeze out before you run it though the planer.
I've used a Hyde paint scrapper for years, like the one in the link below, to good effect for that task.
http://paint-and-supplies.hardwarestore.com/50-273-wall-and-molding-scrapers/1-1-2-4-edge-paint-scraper--671744.aspx
Takes the glue right off, and a fresh sharp blade will even level your seams with little effort.
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