Lee Valley Low-Angle Jack and Bullnose Planes

Hello,
I've been drooling all over my monitor for the new LV low-angle jack. She's a bute! But I am trying to justify why I NEED one. I have the LV #4.5 smooth (honed to a 60 degree pitch) and a Stanley #5 (which I could convert to a scrub, I guess), as well as a LV low-angle block. With all of these, what do I need the low-angle jack for? Alternately, If I had the jack, why would I need the smoother or block? Can someone come up with an excuse for me, as I am not knowledgeable enough?
Also, did anyone else purchase the Medium Shoulder plane from LV and now wish they'd waited? Their new bullnose plane converts to a chisel plane. The only thing I can think of to make myself feel better is that the medium is only 3/4" wide, which I guess could be useful- I guess... Somehow. Can someone come up with any other rationales so I don't feel so bad?
Have Fun,
Bob
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On 12-05-2004 22:44, in article snipped-for-privacy@posting.google.com, "Bob"

Look at www.lienielsen.com why you need a LA jack :-)
kees
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Bob states:

To keep your monitor dry?
Charlie Self "In our civilization, and under our republican form of government, intelligence is so highly honored that it is rewarded by exemption from the cares of office." Ambrose Bierce
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Bob wrote:

Isn't that the truth.

In a word: versatility. I have the L-N version of the plane, and I have used it for endgrain, stock removal, jointing (on small projects) and smoothing.

I'm thinking that the mass and length of the medium shoulder plane will be useful. I don't own either (yet), but I have a couple of the Stanley shoulder planes (#90 and #92), and I find the extended toe on the #92 to be an advantage. If you are cleaning up tenons, it gives you stability that the shorter nose doesn't. Also, FWIW, I have used the #90 as a chisel plane maybe twice in the 6 years that I've owned it. It's uncomfortable as hell to hold with the top piece off, and frankly, it doesn't work all that well that way anyway. (A crank-neck chisel will do most of what a bullnose will, and I think I have better control over the chisel.)
Anyhow, knowing Rob and the gang at LV, they have made some improvements in the original design. Nevertheless, if I were in your position, I think I'd prefer the medium shoulder plane anyway.
Chuck Vance Just say (tmPL) So, how did I do? :-)
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I have the medium shoulder plane. I wouldn't want to be without it. It is excellent for taking out that cigarette paper thick shoulder gap on one side of a tenon. Set the iron fine and one or two passes normally takes care of it. It is well conceived tool. I will be taking it to Waco next month when I go up to build their Brazos Rocker using mesquite. It is a 2 week class, with four students and an instructor. You can see the chair at the links below. http://www.homesteadheritage.com/furniture/distinctive.html http://www.homesteadheritage.com/furniture/solid.html (Does that qualify as a drive-by?)
I only regret that I haven't acquired the new bull nose plane as well. You know it is required to have one of each, so there is no reason to feel bad.

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Thanks for the replies. I feel much better about having the shoulder plane. I still can't convince myself (read: my wife) that I need the LA Jack. Alternately, I can see buying the Jack for its versatility, but then not needing my 4.5 smoother and LA block. Which would be better? Is there some things they can do that the LA Jack can't? Is there anything the Jack can do that they can't? I grabbing for straw here...
Bob

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Maybe SWMBO needs a new sewing machine. :-) Mine went out and bought one that cost more than my major tools in the shop. I'm sure glad she did it.
I can not speak about the L.A. Jack plane. I don't have one and I have never used one. My LN 140 is a low angle skewed iron plane that I use a lot. It is great for smoothing the end grain on raised panels as well as the sides of tenons. I use it or my apron plane to polish the end grain of a piece.
My 604 Bedrock will produce curled shavings on end grain and it is 45 degrees (? - I've never measured it, but what ever the standard angle is.) I also have a 60 degree Knight smoother, but I don't use it often. I may be needing it on the mesquite though.

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wrote:

my Mom quilts. last year she bought a sewing machine that cost her more than my powermatic cabinet saw cost me. I'm not complaining, though. I got her old one. sewing machines are great things to have. I'll never have to wish I had a different tool roll for some particular set of tools again....
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snipped-for-privacy@operamail.com (Bob) wrote in message

The jack is narrower than the #4-1/2, so it lends itself to heavier stock removal (it's also easily adjustable, so yo can go between heavy and thin cuts in seconds). It's longer than the #4-1/2, so it can be used for jointing boards as long as they aren't too long. It also will work well on endgrain. On the other hand, the low-angle block is small enough to use one-handed, so it can do some things that the larger planes can't. Finally, the #4-1/2 with its mass and standard pitch is better suited for smoothing, especially hardwoods. It can also be retrofitted with a higher angle frog which would be very handy for really tricky grain.
So, as you can see, you need all of those planes.
Chuck Vance Just say (tmPL) QED.
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It looks like it has excellent heft to it. Do you find it OK for one-handed use? I know I got to play around with the L-N version a while back and I was havng a hard time figuring out how I could hold it for one-handed use.

Yes, it does, you b*st*rd. :-) Gawd, look at the figure of the wood in the first shot. Better make sure Larry doesn't see it, or he'll probably pass out.

Yeah, I was having a hard time with the concept of helping someone justify the purchase of another tool. I mean, it's never been a problem for me. Just think of a project to make for SWMBO that "requires" the use of said tool. :-)
Chuck Vance
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I don't use the shoulder plane one handed. It has excellent heft and lends itself to removing extremely thin slivers of end grain, leaving a polished look. It is exactly square, flat on the sole. It does exactly what I expected it to do, that is dressing the shoulders on a tenon, correcting any misfits (which I usually have). I used to correct these misfits with a chisel, but the plane is quicker.
The plane can be used one handed to true up a rebate.

I was admiring that chair in the first image at the Houston Woodworking Show (Tiger Maple), when Stan Beckworth told me the design will be used in the new rocking chair class. I smiled and said I would like to take the class, but I really couldn't justify the expense, having already done their Craftsman Rocker. I came home and told SWMBO about the new class and she encouraged me to take the class. :-) So I enrolled.
OBTW, Paul Sellers made the chair at the show and the finish on it was immaculate- museum quality.
They gave me the option of walnut, cherry, mesquite, or figured maple. I wanted to do the maple, but the darker mesquite will fit our decor better. They are a good source of wood, and if I'm successful with the chair, I probably will order wood for the figured maple and bring it home with me to build another chair for a family member.
I owe family and friends a total of three chairs now, I guess I'd better get started.
Did you see Gary's chair in apbw this morning. Maybe he should be teaching classes. :-)
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