JUST ONCE.....

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Video is the owner of Saw-Stop on his website. I think the (ice) salt water is to decrease the impedance of his skin so the detector can see his "meat" before getting past the high impedance part of your body (skin).
Human skin, especially on your hands is probably less conductive than most wood. It would have to cut away the skin into the conductive part of your body before triggering.
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"Justin Time" wrote in message As I understand it, the blade works on electrical signal and not resistance.
Per the website ad: "When skin contacts the blade, the signal changes because the human body is conductive." "The change to the signal activates the safety system."
If I recall, a show on cable called "Time Warp" captures action with a super slo-mo camera. They did a segment about the SawStop and used a real hand. The guy dipped his hand in ice water prior to the test, which I imagined was to slow blood flow, and cut wood allowing his hand to hit the blade and it worked. I can't find any videos right now, but searches may find results.
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Deb, The Sawstop has an override to prevent accidental firing if you are cutting wet wood so your accident may not have been diminshed if you were using a Saw Stop in this mode. (At least this feature was provided on the earlier models as was explained to me at several demonstrations and shows.) However, I don't think your comment about going over the top of the blade is accurate. I also posed questions like that to many of the Saw Stop dudes and they assured me that the blade will sense "flesh" or any other conducting material it touches. They claim that you don't have to be the conduit between the blade and the table for actuation to take place. No, I'm not a Saw Stop owner nor advocate. Anyway, I hope you're healed and really sorry your got cut. Marc
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On 1/20/2012 5:54 PM, Steve Barker wrote:

Saw the hot dog live demo once. It worked as advertised and barely broke the skin of the dog. Amazing demo and when that blade stopped, even though I was expecting some noise it still scared the crap right out of me.
--
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Bob O'Dell
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On 1/20/2012 8:09 PM, Digger wrote:

You ought be in the same room or near the saw when it happens when you WEREN'T expecting it.
We've set ours off about 8 times in several years. Usually because of failure to note embedded metal, wet wood, aluminized vapor backer, etc. Only once when a man was pushing it - he thought he had completed a cut he was pushing along the fence (probably way too close and should have been using a push stick) and set it off with no visible cut, looked more like a splinter.
Yes, it is expensive to set it off. Cartridge and blade.
--


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On 1/21/2012 4:59 PM, DanG wrote:

You guys are wise. IMO, only a fool, with a single employee who's job description included operating a table saw, would not have a SawStop today.
Cheap at fifty times the price ...
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On 1/21/2012 6:25 PM, Swingman wrote:

Let's see, one guy had 7 false one's in a couple of years and one grill that nicked a fing-ee that likely happened because of carelessness brought on by lack of respect enabled by the SS.
$100 for a good blade, $80 for the replacement mechanism, times 8, times 50... $72,000.
I think it would be close to "not cheap" at fifty times the price, at least I know no one that would own or use a tsaw with those sort of numbers mandated.
Also, a power feeder for the hand ringers would keep them safe at least on rip cuts, and it can be adapted to old saws, shapers, router tables and all sorts of dangerous equipment. Personally, I think old folks, like me, should be banned from the dangerous environment of a wood shop. I think it's starting to get a bit dangerous when I enter my shop. I guess I hafta look at it like mountain climbers look at mountains...
Don't need no steenking saw stops...
Jack
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On 1/23/2012 5:03 PM, Jack wrote:

Now I will have to say to trip the mechanism that many times you also will have factor in positive trips that actually saved a finger or hand.
Lets say one time in 50, at Approximately $25,000~$35,000 per incident to cover emergency surgery and reconstruction and rehabilitation and perhaps a prosthetic and lost wages, TIMES 8 equals $200,000~$280,000,
Yes cheap at 50 times the price.
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Ultimately, there's those injuries that can't be surgically repaired which means permanent disfigurement and injury which may cause permanent loss of or change of employment.
Then, there's the cost of the lawsuits and likelihood of large cash pay outs.
Finally, there's all the pain and anguish such an injury will cause. Ultimately, there really isn't any set amount of money you can apply to that.
Your 'cheap at 50 times the price' is just a pittance of the real total cost.
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Don't forget to count the heart attack your wife has, after, and the gas and time off work your family will spend visiting the old fool. What does your hospital charge to park for 1/2 hour? $10, $15 each visit?
People always use the "mind your won business" excuse but it becomes many people's business when this shit happens.
------------ "Dave" wrote in message Ultimately, there's those injuries that can't be surgically repaired which means permanent disfigurement and injury which may cause permanent loss of or change of employment.
Then, there's the cost of the lawsuits and likelihood of large cash pay outs.
Finally, there's all the pain and anguish such an injury will cause. Ultimately, there really isn't any set amount of money you can apply to that.
Your 'cheap at 50 times the price' is just a pittance of the real total cost.
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On 1/23/2012 6:33 PM, Leon wrote:

Well I don't have one, nor a blade guard, nor a rive, and after 50 years of doing this, never nicked one fing-ee. Nor did either of my brothers, nor did my dad. At my age, I would think owning one might be a good idea, but, I don't need no steenking gov't dick head mandating I buy one with a every new saw purchase.
To be really safe, the gov't would have to mandate we stay on the couch, with a remote so we don't slip on an empty gov't approved potato chip bag on the way to the gov't controlled TV.
Jack A Nation of Sheep Breeds a Government of Wolves!
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On 1/24/2012 9:08 AM, Jack wrote:

Jack, you sound exactly like all the people that eventually did have an accident. Almost verbatim your words came out of their mouths. The longer you go with out having an accident the closer you are to having one.

To be really safe, don't cut off your nose to spite your face.
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Cut'em off public health insurance and make him pay his own premiums for being a danger to himself.
------------ "Leon" wrote in message
Jack, you sound exactly like all the people that eventually did have an accident. Almost verbatim your words came out of their mouths. The longer you go with out having an accident the closer you are to having one.
-------------- On 1/24/2012 9:08 AM, Jack wrote:

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Not true. If the chances of anyone having an accident are X, then having had no accidents doesn't increase your chances. That's elementary in statistics. Roll 2 dice. You can calculate the chances for snake-eyes, if nobody tampered with the dice. The next time you roll those same dice, the chances for snake eyes are the same. Now, the chances for rolling snake eyes some time increase with the number of rolls allowed.

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Han
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On 1/24/2012 11:16 AM, Han wrote:

Ummmm do you really believe that some one can do wood working for 50 years and and "never nick one finger? I believer that "x" is actually greater than zero.
Lets be real here.
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On 1/24/2012 12:16 PM, Han wrote:

People ain't dice though. There are two good reasons the chances of an accident increase over time. One is complacency. Get too nonchalant and whack, one less fing-ee. The other is age. The longer you go w/o accident, the older ya get. The older ya get, the more useless ya get and one day, whack, another fing-ee bites the dust....
Perhaps the Gov't should mandate anyone buying/using a saw past the age of 60 or 65 MUST buy a SS.
Jack You know you are getting old when everything either dries up or leaks.
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On 1/24/2012 12:16 PM, Jack wrote:

The principle of _risk-compensation effect_: "When people feel safer, they take more chances, so the total level of safety remains constant".
IOW, more SS's on the market will not necessarily result in fewer table saw accidents, although the severity may arguably decrease, at least at this stage of the game.
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On 1/24/2012 11:16 AM, Jack wrote:

Is there any statistical evidence that woodworkers over 60 are more likely to injure themselves on power tools than those under 60?
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Most guys I know missing a digit lost it while they were "young and invincible", before they had accumulated enough experience to work safely. And most lost it to a skill-saw, not a table saw. I know of more hide lost to jointer-planers and belt sanders and angle grinders than to table saws by a factor of 10 or more.
And the angle grinders bite even when the shroud is installed properly.
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On 1/24/2012 11:16 AM, Han wrote:

Personally, I prefer Bayesian probability over maturity of chances. LOL!
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I wasn't trying to say that in the course of using powertools one doesn't either get more complacent or more experienced/careful. Due to the few not so good experiences, I'm more careful now than earlier in life ...
And looking up Bayesian probability, I got confused early on, so quit further "research" on that subject ... <grin>.
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