jointer problems


I am trying to dress some 4/4 kiln dried birch. I have a 6" jointer and I put new blades in it and set them even with the outfeed table. A lot of little chipping is happening whatever that is technically called. I tried different feed rates, depth of cut from practically nothing up to 3/32", flipping stock end for end all with no help. Would dust collectionn help? Is birch just very hard to dress? Carbide blades (but they are 170 bucks for 3 and HSS are 15). Thanks for any tips.
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for as long. Is it really chipping or is it tearing out or scaloping? When you are done are there chips stuck to your blades? If yes to the last question I would suspect your blades are not sharp,
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Dull blades (even if new, they're not necessarily sharp), and/or excessive depth of cut. Perhaps your definition of "practically nothing" is different from mine? Certainly 3/32 is a *very* heavy cut in birch. Try raising the infeed table until there is no cut at all, then lower it a hair -- just enough that the jointer begins to just shave the board -- and see what the cut is like then. If you still are seeing a lot of tearout, then I think your blades are dull.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Birch is famous for grain reversals. It's not so much chips, like you see with hard maple, but sort of lighter-colored asterisk-looking spots on the surface. That's pretty common. Fortunately they don't go very deep, like only one scrape with your cabinet scraper. If it's appearance you're after, do that.
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1) Are you getting the chipping only with the birch? Try a test piece of scrap of a different type of wood.
2) How sure are you that you got both ends of each blade exactly the same height and exactly level with the outfeed table? Did you check the blades with a dial indicator?
If there is any question about getting the blades just right, search the archive of this group (google groups advanced group search) for some very good discussions of how to set blades.

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A stainless straight edge on the outfeed table and adjust jackscrews under blade until I hear a slight rub and then do the other side.

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I had the same thing happen to me, and an old-timer woodworker told me to first lightly wet the wood with a sponge, then run it through while still damp. That took care of my problem, and was much easier than re-sharpening my brand new knives.
-- Ken snipped-for-privacy@frontiernet.net

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Sounds intersting, I will try that.

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mark wrote:

You may want to wet both sides of the board, to avoid warping the wood.
er
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