Is pine generally kiln dried?

Page 2 of 2  
wrote:

-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan White wrote:

Yes. Whether that translates to safe for the animal I can't answer as don't know what it takes to make it so...
Of course, it's also quite possible the secondary wood is something like poplar or other "white wood". Pine these days is actually fairly expensive relative to some alternatives.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The futon is about 12 years old, if that makes a diff. I need a new digital cam or else I've have posted a pic link. It seems as though the jury is still out on whether it is safe. The sites I see say kiln dried whenever they specify. I haven't seen any that say pine is OK if it has been sitting around for awhile.
Thanks for all the thoughts, and no I'm NOT trolling! :)
dwhite
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But they do sometimes. Here is a site:
http://tx.essortment.com/chinchillainfor_ryva.htm
Which says: Chinchillas need chew toys to keep their teeth from becoming too long. Non treated kiln-dried white pinewood pieces are good for this.
Another site says that fruit tree wood is poisonous to chins, but untreated kiln-dried white pine is the best.
So, there is plenty of discussion about kiln-dried other than for shavings.
thanks, dwhite
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan White wrote:

I think you will find that the kiln dried caveat probably came from someone's experience using fresh material (whole ground up tree limbs that include bark, needles and lots of resin. It is unlikely that your wood frame contains enough resin to affect the animal. More likely is that he weakens the frame and you sit down and crush him.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I get the same feeling. This furniture is over a decade old and the wood is thin, so you would think things like turpentines would be gone by now.
thanks, dwhite
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan White wrote:

I'll bet the culpret is turpenies. The lignens and other resins in pine are very thermaly stablen and would not undergo chemical change in a kiln. Some turpentine would be distilled off in a kiln at 180 F. The same process would occure at room temperature over a few years. Freshly cut (or machined as in shaveings) pine might be another thing. I will look up a MSDS for turpentine and get back to you with a LD50.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
woodbutcher wrote: ...

I was going to suggest a second as a test animal myself...That would establish a 50-th percentile, right? :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Duane Bozarth wrote:

I was wrong on the turpentine bet. The LD50 (the amount it takes to kill 50% of the test animals) for rats is 3700 - 5000mg/Kg. That means that of rats eating about 0.4% of their body weight of pure turpentine 50% of them will die. Since even in fresh pine there isn't much turpentine unless you get stumps of "fat pine", that it is impossible for a rat to die of turpentine poisoning. Chins are very close cousins of rats. If pine is toxic, then it aint turpentine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My two might take exception to that remark. :)
dwhite
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If your information is correct, and the chinchilla lives, then the wood was kiln dried.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

But...
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 16:03:24 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net (Lawrence Wasserman) wrote:

Thinking about this I'd worry more about the impact of the finish than the wood on the chinchilla's delicate little tummy.
--RC
"Sometimes history doesn't repeat itself. It just yells 'can't you remember anything I've told you?' and lets fly with a club. -- John W. Cambell Jr.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net writes:

Some tabasco or habanero sauce will stop the chewing and then no concern. Unless, of course, the hot stuff is harmful to them making it a good idea to first ask a vet.
Glenna
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.