Interesting idea, attempt 2

If this could be done cutting into a contrasting wood top...
http://www.homindeco.com/furniture-design/natural-wood-table-modern - traditional-designs/
basilisk
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basilisk wrote:

Great look. Wonder how they got the top and bottom of the stump co-planar.
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On Sun, 02 Sep 2012 21:38:18 -0400, G. Ross wrote:

I don't know, I know how I would do it with what I have on hand, cut and flatten the bottom, then set up a sight level and have an assistant pencil mark on zero as far around as possible, rotate piece and continue around until the whole circumference is marked, clunky and time consuming, but it would get the job done.
Obviously, someone with production in mind, would not do it that way.
basilisk
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"G. Ross" wrote in message
basilisk wrote:

Great look. Wonder how they got the top and bottom of the stump co-planar. ============================================================================Router.
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Well, comparing that stump with the cedar log sections I've done, if that stump is solid, it would be heavy as heck, really heavy.... and awkward to move. I would suspect one couldn't move it without some equipment or help. If the bottom were perfectly flat, one would have even more trouble moving it by hand, unless it were on casters or feet. As heavy as a solid stump would be, to try to move the table by handling the table top, that top may pop off (separate from) the base.
It doesn't need to be flat on the bottom, just nearly so. Only 3 points need to touch, tripod like, to be stable on any relatively flat surface. I would suspect there are at least 4 points of floor contact on that stump. On my jardineires, there are 3 casters. On a table, as shown, the top can be flat and whatever casters/feet, under neath, can be adjustable to level the top. I would suspect the bottom's edge is 1/2" off the floor, like an upholstered skirt on furniture, and there are casters or feet, out of sight, under the base. No one would ever know the top and bottom is not exactly coplanar. They just need to be nearly so. And the bottom surface doesn't need to be perfectly flat, either.
A method I use for trimming limb legs, on log slab table tops, is to shim under the feet/legs until the top is level, then mark the bottom (legs) relative to the floor. I'm making some side tables for a friend and did this very leveling last night. Since the legs are not straight cut lumber, one can't always simply measure, for trimming to length. Sonny
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[This followup was posted to rec.woodworking and a copy was sent to the cited author.]
In article <d7966f06-75a3-4b48-b440-dcb034edf190

It is highly doubtful to me that the tops would "pop off" the stump base. From the description page given the tops are made of a smooth surface of solid resin. Just looking at the pictures it is clear that the resin is cast in place around the top of the stump. (Actually most likely the resin is cast in a large shallow form / pan with the stump inverted and sitting in the liquid resin as it sets up). After the resin has solidified it is then likely sanded across the whole top to a very nice shine and then post finished with a series of clear finish coats to seal the wood.
I am not that familiar with large pieces of cast resin to know if it has high strength or if special reinforcement is embedded into the cast resin. One can note that in the picture examples it appears that the tables with a more cantilevered design have tops that are thicker. This may have to do with the strength of the materials.
There is a video interview with makers of the tables at the following web link:
http://www.mthwoodworks.com/home
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Michael Karas
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I suspect the tables don't hold up well and the strength of the wood- to-resin bond isn't strong enough to last any good reasonable time. Western red cedar is not a strong wood and it's going to move, over time, weakening the original bond. Some customer is going to try to move their table by handling the top and I suspect that handling will loosen it, if it doesn't pop completely off. mth Woodworks hasn't been in business but a year. I'd be interested to see customer feedback, after some reasonable time.

I don't like them, either.
Sonny
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"Sonny" wrote in message

I suspect the tables don't hold up well and the strength of the wood- to-resin bond isn't strong enough to last any good reasonable time. Western red cedar is not a strong wood and it's going to move, over time, weakening the original bond. Some customer is going to try to move their table by handling the top and I suspect that handling will loosen it, if it doesn't pop completely off. mth Woodworks hasn't been in business but a year. I'd be interested to see customer feedback, after some reasonable time. ================================================================If they put any thought in them at all, they would likely last at least 30 years.
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On 9/2/2012 8:28 PM, basilisk wrote:

Ok, what is happening is that your news writer, whatever you are using to compose these posts, is breaking the line instead of wrapping the line. Usually this is simply a matter of adjusting your settings/ options/ preferences to compensate for shortened line lengths.
If composing or sending in plain-text (many editors support this option), it is always best to enclose the hypertext address within Less than/ Greater than characters such as...<http://some_hypertext_address_here/>
This will help keep things together when dealing with long http addresses.
Another possibility is <http://tinyurl.com
I saw the original post and was intrigued by the concept, but I do not know how it was, or is done with any degree of precision.
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Digger
Bob O'Dell
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I'll be a contrarian... Those are the ugliest pieces of crap I've seen this year.
Seriously ugly.
Like someone started with ugly, then sprayed about 17 coats of even uglier.
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"Dave Balderstone" wrote in message wrote:

I'll be a contrarian... Those are the ugliest pieces of crap I've seen this year.
Seriously ugly.
Like someone started with ugly, then sprayed about 17 coats of even uglier. ===============================================================+1
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On Mon, 03 Sep 2012 14:26:07 -0600, Dave Balderstone wrote:

I don't like the resin tops either, but if the stump was fitted into a contrasting wood top, it would be a nice piece.
basilisk
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Definitely not to my taste. I think a wood top MIGHT drop it back to only 12 coats of even uglier.
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On Mon, 03 Sep 2012 18:44:06 -0600, Dave Balderstone wrote:
<snip>

To each his own, I like the look of "as provided by nature".
basilisk
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