Cutting into drywall

I never liked cutting into drywall because you never know what's in the
wall. Could be electrical, could be plumbing, could be HVAC, could be
this...
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Reply to
Jim Joyce
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My wife was always funny about that stuff. She was a builder and had drywall guys working for her so drywall was never a thing. She had an inspector screw with her one day about putting up the rock before he signed off on the FEPA/C for that wall. She said "What do you want to see"? He said something about something in a wall. She walked over and grabbed a hammer from a framer and just started wailing on the wall, hooking it with the claw and ripping out big chunks. "Let me know when you have seen what you need to see". He closed up his clipboard box and signed the permit.
Reply to
gfretwell
On Mon, 14 Dec 2020 18:50:33 -0600, Jim Joyce snipped-for-privacy@none.invalid wrote:
She is a woman of action.
Reply to
gfretwell
In alt.home.repair, on Mon, 14 Dec 2020 14:36:07 -0600, Jim Joyce
Unrelated, political, but I found it after clicking Next a few times
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On December 14, 2020, during an interview with CNN's Jake Tapper, Mitchell announced he will no longer continue as a member of the Republican Party and would serve out the rest of his term in Congress as an independent.[20] [Unfortunately, that's January 2nd, so he won't have much effect, but his words are good. And it shows that at least one politician got sick when watching the Republican after-election misbehaviour. ]
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successor is Republican also.
Reply to
micky
In alt.home.repair, on Mon, 14 Dec 2020 20:29:48 -0500,
How did she become a builder? Usually when women have jobs like that, they inherited their father's business.
Reply to
micky
On Mon, 14 Dec 2020 21:24:29 -0500, micky snipped-for-privacy@fmguy.com wrote:
She started in the contract department of Centex, writing change orders and moved over to the building side. After a couple of years they let her bring her own community out of the ground. (100 houses). When she started on that community, they had just taken over from land development, building with no water, power or roads. She was building them 16 at a time and "closing" houses for other field managers who had difficult customers. She was rated #4 in the whole Southeast Region of Centex before the crash. (balanced performance, On time, on budget, customer sat)
Reply to
gfretwell
Good for her. Not an easy thing to do. I see the housing going up around me and it really is quite a project to turn acres of dirt into a community with all the utilities, roads, EPA regulations needed.
What still amazed me coming from semi-rural part of New England is the amount of sidewalk. There is a Del Webb development going in about 10 miles from me and so far, they have done a bit of grading where roads will be, dropped some of the sewer piping on site, but a half mile of sidewalk is already in by the road.
Reply to
Ed Pawlowski
Back in the "go go OO"s it was all about getting the houses built. Utilities and the roads came in after a significant number of houses were built up to the final. They were bringing water in on buffalos although some of the stucco was done using lake water. The land development guy's house was one of the early ones and I suggested stuccoing a frog in near his front door to try to speed the water project along. I used to joke with them that the Romans had paved roads and running water 2000 years ago. They had a bunch of houses done and waiting for water/sewer to get a CO. I was amazed at how much material was wasted. It was all about speed. They did not bother to move unused materials to the next house. It just got thrown in the dumpster. That was good for me tho. They called me Fred Sanford because I looked in the dumpsters before I said hi. I did get a lot of cool stuff. One of my favorites was 2x12 rough sawn western red cedar. There were always pieces in there 6-10 feet long and occasionally I found a whole 16' stick. There is a lot of cedar stuff around here ;-) I got all the block and steel I needed for my addition and gave away 8 cubes. I got enough pavers to cover my shed, the wall behind the bar, a fireplace and few other things. I had 10 boxes of "El dorado" cultured stone like you see at Perkins. We used it for flower bed edging. (set in a concrete barrier) I wouldn't use that crap anywhere you could get a good look at it.
Reply to
gfretwell
In alt.home.repair, on Tue, 15 Dec 2020 12:51:39 -0500,
Very impressive. So what does a dynamic woman like her want with you?
I would think sidewalks go in last.
Final what?
I've been told my house was built illegally. The new sewer line had not been finished? when the house was started, and building permits were not supposed to have been issued. I do think the sewer was completed before anyone moved in. :-0
That's a lot of great stuff.
I've not gotten building materials, but I used to climb in the dumpster at the Black & Decker store and retrieve tools. Some they broked a hole in the case before throwing them away, to thwart people like me, but some were in one piece and still worked fine. The weed wackers they bent the aluminum tube but I bought some aluminum tubing and made replacements for two.
At the apartment building near me someone threw away in 2 or 3 big garbage bags loads of clothes, some other stuff and about 30 pairs of what looked like brand new women's shoes. The shoes I gave to a charity thrift shop near me and when I went back, they were selling them for $5 a pair and only had about 3 pairs left.
My best find there however was a heavy duty electric wheel chair. It was hard to push so I ended up riding it home. It worked well. I called a guy I knew of who was very well respected in town and ran a medical supply store. He came over and said the chair, used as it was**, was worth $1000. He suggested I call the MS or MD foundation and they had me call a medical supply store which apparently stored such things for them and lent them for free. And they came and got it.
I also found, not in the trash but on the grass next to the street a practically brand new Epson printer, copier, scanner, fax with wifi. It was so good, I went back to the house to make sure it was meant to be taken, and the guy who lived there was ambiguous but he didn't want it back. My best guess is that a roommate he didn't like left it behind and he was getting rid of anything that reminded him.
**The foam rubber on one arm and somewhere else had big chunks missing, and the support for one leg wasn't there. (I hate to think of why.)
I'm sure I knew whose chair it was. There was a guy in a chair who would often sit outside with another guy (maybe in a non-electric chair). The first one died, and when they cleaned out his apartment, they just threw everything away. No thought to donating it. I'm glad I found it. There was also the thing that hangs over a bed so that one can pull oneself up to sitting from lying down.
Reply to
micky
Sidewalk by the houses go in near the end. This is along the road. I'm amazed at how much sidewalk there is here. From my house to the highway is 4 miles and on either side of the road you can walk on sidewalk. At the highway one side has a gap but it picks up again. There is nothing along the road in places, no houses, no stores, but concrete sidewalk.
Reply to
Ed Pawlowski
In alt.home.repair, on Tue, 15 Dec 2020 17:17:31 -0500, Ed Pawlowski
"With sidewalks, together, we will build a better America."
Reply to
micky
On Tue, 15 Dec 2020 16:34:27 -0500, micky snipped-for-privacy@fmguy.com wrote:
I have a big dick
It depends on what the builder wants to do. I knew a guy in DC who's family was in the dirt business in Southern Md (Bevard). They would go into a place, mine out the sand and gravel, set up a concrete plant and run it until they were running out of material. Before they broke down the concrete plant they platted the lots and put in the curb, gutter and sidewalks. Once the builder was done they would sell them "top soil" to put under the sod. The "top soil" was a mix of gravel plant tailings (silt) and sludge from Blue Plains. The sod grew like crazy but they also had cherry tomatoes popping up because tomato seeds survive digestion. That was those big 18 red wheelers that looked like big concrete trucks you saw around DC with no writing on them. They were hauling sludge.
inspections. You can finish the house but without utilities you can't get a CO.
That is the CO deal
Cool
Reply to
gfretwell
On Tue, 15 Dec 2020 16:34:27 -0500, micky posted for all of us to digest...
The local township told me they like the curbs in so when it's paved they can pave against it.
Sidewalks are popular now because they want to make a "community" where the residents can walk to the amenities.
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Tekkie©

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