Cutting a cultured marble vanity top

A friend is remodeling his bathroom. He has one of those cultured marble vanity tops which still looks like new. The bottom of it is stamped 2008. so its 10 years old. He was going to throw it in the trash, but I measured it and it will fit the vanity cabinet in my bathroom, except it's about 5" too long. I told him I'll take it off his hands.
I have been wanting to replace my counter top anyhow, because it's formica on plywood and the formica is coming loose and buckling.
So my friend pulled it off his counter and when he set it down against the floor, the corner of the backsplash cracked off. It's a clean crack, so I could epoxy it back on and it would probably not even be noticable.
However, that top is still too long, and I dont intend to replace the cabinet. The cabinet on my friends vanity is junk, particle board and is falling apart at it's base. Even if he did have a good cabinet, it would be too close to my toilet. I need to stick to the size I have now.
So, I'm wondering if I can saw off that cultured marble top? Not only will it fit my cabinet, but I'll be sawing off that cracked corner. Since my counter top is in a corner, the sawed off part will be against the wall, so it wont be seen. A little tub caulk will conceal any imperfections in my cut if I dont get it precise.
Yea, my sink wont be exactly centered, but I'm not too worried about that.
Anyhow, has anyone ever cut one of them? Do I use a concrete blade in my circular saw, or what? (I'll have to cut it from the bottom side because of the backsplash. I am a little concerned about it cracking off irregularly when I get near the end of the cut, because that corner cracked from just bumping against a wooden floor, so that material has to be fairly weak. (Does that stuff get weak and brittle from time?).
I'm willing to try cutting it. If it breaks I am not out any money. But I'd like to learn the best way to cut it, and with any luck, it will work out for me. -Thanks-
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On Wed, 06 Jun 2018 00:13:16 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@noemail.com wrote:

You might be able to do it with an abrasive masonry blade but I know a diamond blade works. Clamp a board on it as a guide and go slow.
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On Wed, 06 Jun 2018 01:23:02 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That's what a professional installer used on my CM shower surround. It was raining when he cut it, so he did it in my garage. Now everything in my garage is coated with CM powder! What a mess!
--
croy

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wrote:

You can knock the dust down quite a but if you put wet cardboard on the top and cut over something that catches the dust below. I just do my dry cutting in the driveway wearing a respirator and ear protection. Hose the place down when you are done.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com posted for all of us...

Does the runoff go into the oyster beds and produce a pearl?
--
Tekkie

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Yes, you can cut it. With most anything, steel, carbide, diamond, masonry blade. Use a relatively small tooth on a toothed blade..
To cut off the backsplash area, hang the top over a bench so that the backsplasy hangs over and finish the cut with a saber saw. After you cut a ways, you could rotate all a bit, clamp cut portion of splash to table near the cut and clamp main part.
Finish the cut surface with some #80 paper wrapped around a piece of wood.
These things are really easy to cut, no reaon you couldn't cut some each end to center the sink if you want.
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