Inline speed control for a grinder

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This writer talks about an "inline speed control" for a grinder.
http://toolguyd.com/bench-grinder-craftsman-ryobi-porter-cable-recommendation /
Does anyone know what he is talking about? What should I buy to set this up for my Craftsman grinder? I need lower speeds for my lathe tools.
Thanks,
Mike
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Though I don't know for sure, I would think it is an inline switch to slow or speed up the grinder/grinding speed, similar to a dimmer switch for a light. If they (in the link) suspect the Craftsman is adaptable for one, you might ask at Sears what it is and/or if it's available.
Sonny
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In article

Only "universal" motors can have speed control of the "dimmer-switch" type. Those with a capacitor, the more usual motors fitted to grinders etc, cannot be varied in speed. If a manufacturer has built a speed control into a machine it is, of course, going to work fine.
The Craftsman quotes a 1/6th hp motor - forget it. The moment you start trying to grind something it'll slow right down
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Stuart Winsor

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Stay away from dimmer switches. Motor variometers are much better choice. I don't know that your motor can handle variable speed.
If you bought a 3450 grinder too bad. Way too fast. Even 1725-1750 in my mind is too fast.
If you have a grinder 3450, get a set of pillow blocks, and sheaves and step down the speed. Remount the stone on the new shaft Use a sheave like used on drill presses so you can adjust your speed.
On 2/19/2012 11:07 AM, Sonny wrote:

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"tiredofspam" wrote in message
Stay away from dimmer switches. Motor variometers are much better choice. I don't know that your motor can handle variable speed.
If you bought a 3450 grinder too bad. Way too fast. Even 1725-1750 in my mind is too fast.
If you have a grinder 3450, get a set of pillow blocks, and sheaves and step down the speed. Remount the stone on the new shaft Use a sheave like used on drill presses so you can adjust your speed.
====================================================================I have a variable speed grinder. I turned it down once just to see what it would be like. Turned it back up and left it there.
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tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

I bought one of these:
http://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-axminster-awwsg-wetstone-grinder-prod809134 /
It's impossible to overheat a tool on the slow running wetstone but rather time consuming if you've anything more than a light "touch-up" to perform.
--
Stuart Winsor

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On Feb 19, 1:53pm, tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

I use a 1725 rpm grinder with a coarse white friable alox wheel. Haven't burned a tool yet. I don't even use a water dip.

Or use a smaller wheel. Halving the diameter has the same effect as halving the speed.
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On 2/19/2012 1:53 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

I've been grinding my lathe tools on a high speed grinder for 40 years, no problemo. I am not alone, and I'm not [all that] special. The wheel density/make up has a lot to do with how quickly things heat up. Perhaps a different choice of wheels is in order?
--

Jack
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I'm a fan of buying the right tool for the job. Sometimes, there can be modifications that can be done safely, and the results are within parameters. And sometimes performance and safety suffer. Not to mention the user.
$.02
Steve
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If you can do it safely, and it works, that's good. I have just seen a lot of jury rigging, and it ends up costing more than the right tool, and then they have to go buy it, and the money's wasted.
Steve
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You can't buy talent, and there are no shortcuts to expertise. Sounds like good lessons for aspiring musicians as well. :)
--
www.ewoodshop.com

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On Wed, 22 Feb 2012 23:39:52 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

Dittoes. And think of all the synergistic and serendipitous learning which can come from the simple making of mistakes. Thomas Edison is a perfect example, a man who pushed his way through his mistakes and failures, all the way to a brilliant <wink> success. He theorized, experimented, and failed his way through to 1093 patents.

No, expertise needs action/practice to mold its shape. But think of the benefits to all if everyone read more. One truly can read their way to competence.
-- Every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving. -- Albert Einstein
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Now, I totally disagree with your last sentence. America is full of experts, people who are educated beyond their capacity, and most of them are teachers or government employees.
Steve
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<...snipped...>

And the rest if them are usenet posters!
--
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with the average voter. (Winston Churchill)
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On 2/22/2012 12:47 PM, Steve B wrote:

We all are. I'm not so sure a high speed grinder is not the right tool for lathe tool sharpening.
Sometimes, there can be modifications that can be done safely, and the results are within

Yabut grinders are fairly safe tools, I think. About all that can go wrong grinding a lathe tool is the wrong angle and burning the temper. Not saying I haven't looked at some of the fancy nancy low speed sharpening gizmo's out there, but not so much for my lathe tools as other things. Lathe tools work perfect right off the grinder, and need no fancy honing and polishing.
If I didn't already have a high speed grinder, I probably could be talked into a Griz low speed grinder, or more likely one of those fancy nancy Tormek Wet Sharpening things. I would not jump though hoops to slow down my bench grinder, which does a super job on my lathe tools, not to mention grinding points on off screws, sharpens drills, lawnmower blades and a million other things.
--
Jack
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Density, composition, and binder. Coarse white alox, vitrified bond cuts fast. Vitrified bond means dull grains break off the wheel, making it essentially self-dressing.
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On 2/19/2012 9:57 AM, Michael wrote:

A common in line speed control is one sold to slow down routers. You plug into the speed control and dial the speed you want.
Keep in mind yo need a different type speed control for a universal motor, one with brushes, than one that works with a capacitor start motor, those found on larger more stationary equipment.
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Michael wrote:

I haven't heard of any that would work on this type of motor. For a motor with brushes, such as a drill, router etc there are speed controls available.
--
Gerald Ross

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"Michael" wrote in message
This writer talks about an "inline speed control" for a grinder.
http://toolguyd.com/bench-grinder-craftsman-ryobi-porter-cable-recommendation /
Does anyone know what he is talking about? What should I buy to set this up for my Craftsman grinder? I need lower speeds for my lathe tools.
Thanks, ============================================================================================He basically doesn't know what he is talking about.
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Most bench grinders and almost certainly the pictured Craftsman use induction motors and speed control is not practical. There is little reason to use anything BUT an induction motor on a bench grinder UNLESS it was designed with the intention of having variable speed. The common speed controls used for routers and other tools with universal motors will not work with induction motors. Your best bet for the lathe tools using a regular grinder is frequent dunking of the tool in water.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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