I did *exactly* what I told myself not to do and split a piece of wood.

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I come here to humble myself...
I was assembling a nightstand similar to this:
http://www.lowes.com/creative-ideas/images/2013_11/SideTable3ways-hero.jpg
I modified the design to make it taller to match the height of a tall bed a nd also raised the top shelf so that it is flush with the top of the side s lats. (It's a nightstand for my daughter's college apartment)
I knew going in that I had to be careful when screwing the top shelf to the slats. Being so close to the end of the slats introduced a lot of potentia l for splitting. Of course, I pre-drilled and countersunk for the screws.
I specifically said to myself "If you need to remove a screw for any reason , be damn sure the screw gun is set to extract the screw, not drive it in f urther."
Low and behold, after attaching all 19 slats to both the top and bottom she lf, I noticed that 1 (one!) slat was not fully seated against the top shelf . Simple fix: remove the screw, clamp the slat to the shelf and carefully d rive the screw back in. Easy peazy.
So I grab the screw gun and promptly drive the screw further into the wood, splitting the slat.
Now I have to set up the table saw to rip a new slat. Luckily the router ta ble is still set up the same so the round overs will be easy to match. Then there's the finish sanding. I thought I was done!
Any other mistake during assembly would have been bad enough, but to do *ex actly* what I warned myself not to do really sucks!
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On 7/23/2015 1:27 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Nooooo... Unless you really screwed up you can easily repair the split. Force some glue in the crack and clamp. Happens all the time.
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Yeah, sad to say I've done that more than once. As long as it's just one crack (and not two cracks with a loose wedge in between) the result is pretty much invisible.
John
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On Thursday, July 23, 2015 at 3:25:07 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

I had considered that, but it's not a single clean split. While there is on e small split down the side of the slat, the top is kind of spider-web cra cked. The slats are also rounded over on the top and corners so I'm not sur e I can close up the spider webs with clamps. I'll try.
I may see what other options I can come up with. I've thought about removin g a good slat near the back to replace the split one near the front. I coul d then flip the split one over (after filling the screw holes) and use it t owards the back where the filled holes won't be seen and the split will be near/on the floor.
If I was painting it I'd be less concerned but it's going to be wipe-on pol yed since I want it to match the bed I built for my daughter last year.
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On 7/23/2015 3:27 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

At least try, you have nothing to loose.

Yeah and when you move the slats around you will split those too. ;~) Just kidding, but you know how that goes.

Paint just that one slat. ;~) It'll be a conversation piece.
Sorry again, I know you are pissed. You will come up with a great solution I am sure. Keep up posted.
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On Thursday, July 23, 2015 at 4:42:50 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

I played around for a very short time last night, mainly just to see what a clamp would do for the split. I (carefully) unscrewed the slat from the nightstand and used a 24" trigger clamp to try and close the split.
Similar clamp: http://static.grainger.com/rp/s/is/image/Grainger/18G791_AS01?$zmmain$
I could not close the split completely with that clamp.
I then tried a Jorgensen bar clamp:
http://cdn.mscdirect.com/global/images/ProductImages/6215442-23.jpg
With considerable effort, I was able to close the split, although it did not disappear completely in either the side grain or the end grain.
It really won't be much work to make a new slat. It'll probably take less time than it will for the glue to dry completely.
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That strongly suggests there was a lot of stress in that piece of wood, and it was probably going to split (or warp, or do something else undesirable) anyway. This may be a blessing in diguise...
John
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On Friday, July 24, 2015 at 2:31:10 PM UTC-4, John McCoy wrote:

Those were my thoughts exactly. Now I can starting stressing over the internals of the other 18 slats (pun intended).
I just have to keep reminding myself:
College apartment furniture College apartment furniture College apartment furniture
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On Friday, July 24, 2015 at 3:21:59 PM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Replacement slat cut, routed, sanded and installed - unsplit.
I did 5 hours of greasy brake work (don't ask!) on an 85° Sunday. I was already dirty and sweaty, so I decided to add some sawdust to the mix before showering.
A few coats of wipe-on poly and the nightstand will be ready to be dropped off when I move my daughter into her next college apartment (actually a shared house) in August. Surprise!
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Early Fall? :-)

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On Monday, July 27, 2015 at 4:53:52 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

Whoops...I guess I forgot that it's all relative. 85 is really hot around h ere, especially this summer. I will now tract my complaint.

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On 7/27/2015 7:33 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

;~) I just checked my garage, 95 and it is 8:40 pm. But when the sun goes down my wife and I hang out on our back patio under the ceiling fan. With a cold drink you almost get a chill... So fortunately it cools off, or feels nice, with out the sun.
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On Thursday, July 23, 2015 at 3:28:01 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Wide rubber band should do the trick.
I have cut tractor tire inner tubes, into long strips, for wrap-clamping sp lits as that. Works well. Sometimes the "black", of the inner tube, ma rs the wood.... easily sanded off. Glued on "black" is a little tougher t o remove, but easy enough. Takes 2-3 yrs for the inner tube to "dry-rot" and begin to break.
Chem lab rubber hoses work well and leave no marks on the wood.... dry rot in 2-3 yrs, also.
Making spare parts: I make extra upholstery buttons and attach to a piece , in an unseen spot.
Sonny
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Whenever I make anything that has that multiple small parts, I always make an extra or two. I learned over time that there is two major difficulties with many small parts.
1) You will damage one of them. Similar to what you just did.
2) Sometimes there will be one part that just is just a little off. You save that part for an extra. Besides, for a project like this, one of those parts may get damaged down the road. Having an extra or two laying around would make repairs much simpler.
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On Thursday, July 23, 2015 at 3:49:57 PM UTC-4, Lee Michaels wrote:

Damaged? In a college apartment? I don't think so. ;-)
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On Thu, 23 Jul 2015 13:27:56 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

year or two down the road, and remembering what it is, and what it is for, when you are going through your pile looking for " a little piece of" for another project - the 2 weeks later needing that peice to do the repair!!!!!
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On 7/23/2015 2:49 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

Good advice, making an extra one or two. That insures that you end up with an extra one or two after the build. ;~) Don't make the extras and you will surely need them.

Oh heck no! Damage down the road just builds character. Replace a damaged part and the perfect part stick out like sore thumb. :~) AND,,,, you will never find that extra part. BTDT LOL
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On Thu, 23 Jul 2015 11:27:11 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

I'm sure you're the only one in this group that's ever ruined anything. What a rookie! P-)
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On Thursday, July 23, 2015 at 5:33:52 PM UTC-4, Gordon Shumway wrote:

e slats. (It's a nightstand for my daughter's college apartment)

tial for splitting. Of course, I pre-drilled and countersunk for the screws .

n further."

elf. Simple fix: remove the screw, clamp the slat to the shelf and carefull y drive the screw back in. Easy peazy.

hen there's the finish sanding. I thought I was done!

Oh, I've ruined stuff before, don't you worry about that! :-)
I just can't believe (oh, sure I can) that I did exactly what I specificall y told myself to make sure I didn't do just a few hours before. As I'm sure many of us have done, I let my mind wonder - thinking about showing the co mpleted nightstand to SWMBO - instead of concentrating on the task at hand.
Well, better my mind wonders at the assembly table and not at the table saw , that's for sure.
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On Thu, 23 Jul 2015 11:27:11 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

never think of?
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