how to sharpen Inshave or Scorp


Hi All,
I'm doing a chair and would like to saddle the seat using inshave (needs to buy one).
Can you recommend a $50 inshave you like? How frequent does inshave needs honing/sharpening? And most importantly, what's the best method for sharpening inshave?
Thanks, Ziko.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Unfortunately I'm not going to be much help here as I've never used an inshave so can't comment on your questions. I can say however, that if you're using tools, that this book is excellent at helping with the sharpening aspect of just about anything:
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p2991&cat=1,43072,43091
In terms of how frequent you'll need to sharpen one of these up, that will depend more on your situation (wood type, technique, etc) and the tool itself to really give an accurate answer. Cheers, cc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep, you sharpen when it's too dull to cut as you need to cut. I use a gouge stone. Fine India, followed by an Arkansas slip and chromium oxide strop.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Is it practical to use sanding sleeve on a dril press to sharpen inshave?
regards, ziko.
George wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nope. You want the scratches perpendicular to the edge. That way you get a bit of tooth sliding it sideways as you draw it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No - I have a few scorps, inshaves and round adzes, but I rarely use them. Instead I use an Arbortech cutter in an angle grinder.
If you do want an inshave, then I've found the Bristol Design (pale blue handles) tools to be good.
The Arbortech is easy to use, works on any timber (including awkwardly grained elm) and most of all is _quick_. The downside is that it's very quick - it can easily cut faster than you're expecting, so make templates and check regularly. It's even worth using a template 1/4" short for a first pass, then going over to final size.
A curved spokeshave is useful for finishing. As it has a mouth, unlike a drawknife, it's easier to use for a thin controlled shaving. Unfortunately the Clifton I use has handles that curve downwards too much, limiting its use for a deep cut in a wide board.

This depends on the timber. Ideally the drawknife family are green wood tools. The timber is soft (so a perfect edge is less crucial) and they work by splitting ahead of the edge with a wedge action, as much as they do by cutting (so the edge suffers less wear). This isn't to say that you shouldn't have a sharp edge on your green tools, but it certainly takes less effort to keep it there.

A big hand-held coarse stone, moved over a firmly clamped shave. They're generally sharpened out-cannel (bevel out) so access is easy. If you want to hone them, a powered leather wheel (rotating away from you, unlike a grinder) is quick and convenient.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.