How to find a local supplier for wooden hexagons

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wrote:

700 or so if you could honeycomb them, otherwise, something over 500 perhaps. Honeycomb is possible with other material [metal], and laser or high pressure water jet, and a computerised system. Unfortunately, MDF would either burn, or absorb moisture and deform.

"Exact"?
The problem as I see it is that the expectation of a "precise" fit is argumentative. Most have trouble cutting *one* hexagon and having all sides turn out exactly as they expected first shot. It might look OK in individual pieces, but when you assemble, the errors, however small, *will* compound, and that adds up to a lot of effort for something made out of pressed paper.
Too much talk on this topic already. I'm done.
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Ok I read that your 6 sides will each be 2" long. This will result in a hexagon being 3- 7/16" wide if measured from side to side and 4" wide if measured from point to point.
The quantity coming from 2, 4x8 sheets of 3/4" MDF does not matter. I would supply the materials as your shipping cost to me would probably cost more than the materials.
I can cut the pieces to be the required measurements verified with a ruler.
Sand the hexes? What for? Sanding will make them unequal in size.
How much to produce? You need to tell me how many you want.
How much to ship? Again I need to know what quantity I am shipping.
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Ok I read that your 6 sides will each be 2" long. This will result in a hexagon being 3- 7/16" wide if measured from side to side and 4" wide if measured from point to point.

The quantity coming from 2, 4x8 sheets of 3/4" MDF does not matter. I would supply the materials as your shipping cost to me would probably cost more than the materials.

I can cut the pieces to be the required measurements verified with a ruler.

Sand the hexes? What for? Sanding will make them unequal in size.

How much to produce? You need to tell me how many you want.

How much to ship? Again I need to know what quantity I am shipping.

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I still do not see the point of presenting an answer to this question. I do not know nor would it affect the price very much if an extra 2 sheets were needed to fill the order. The labor and time will be the vast majority of the expence.

A CNC router , No. I would cut the blanks out with a TS.

No one is going to get a splinter from MDF. MDF is not solid wood rather a wood product.

Why on earth would the quantity be limited to an exact 2 sheets? My cost on 2 sheets of 3/4" MDF IIRC is about $45. Time is more important to me than waste.

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I need at least 338. Would like 350 if the incremental cost is negligible.
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$498.00 for 338
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On 4 Jul 2005 21:47:27 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

I don't want to spoil any potential business for Morris, but if you can't afford a couple of sheets of plywood instead of MDF, as you state a little later in the thread, what are the odds of your being able to pay for at least a couple of hours worth of time on a CNC router?
If you've got a table saw, you can cut as many as you want, as accurately as you can set a saw up (which is pretty accurate if you're patient), with a decent fence and a couple of simple jigs. The trick to making the pieces consistantly is to do all the reps of each op before changing the setup, and verifying the setup every so often by measuring a sample piece. I'd set up the fence, rip the entire sheet into strips, then cut those strips into rhombuses with a miter guage set to 30 degrees that has a hunk of flat scrap bolted to it as a sacrificial extension, with a stop block screwed into that extension on the far side of the blade to make sure each part is the same length. Flip the rhobuses (or is it rhombii?) over and set the accute corner against the stop block and viola, you have hexagons.
If you don't have a table saw, but do have a miter saw, you can buy the MDF from a real lumber yard that has a shop on location, and have them rip the sheet into strips. You'll have to pay them for the service, but I used to do that before I had a table saw, and it wasn't too terribly expensive. (IIRC, I had a local place rip 8 or 9 8" planks of spruce into 1.5" wide strips for me, and it cost about seven bucks) Then you can use a c-clamp to setup a stop block on the miter saw fence, and cut away.
Both of these methods have the potential to be accurate to a 64th or better, and they're a lot less expensive. Not to mention the fact that you'll have some good experience doing it when all is said and done, and you can say that you made them yourself. If you play your cards right, you may even get a new tool or two out of the bargin. MDF is cheap- even if you have to buy a saw, and mess up three or four sheets before you get it right, you're still liable to save money doing the job yourself.
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Actually plywood does not seem that much more than MDF. So, I could afford plywood. (What I cannot afford is real wood like cherry). :)
I considered plywood but it seemed... less solid... (and more prone to giving users handling the hexes splinters) than MDF. I do understand that MDF has moisture issues which is a big disadvantage (as there is some small risk of liquid spillage for my intended use). But does plywood break apart? Do I have to worry about the layers of the plywood separating?
Unfortunately, I do not have the tools (yet) to tackle this. Nor the expertise to get to 1/64 or better precision. And more importantly, I have a time constraint that will not allow me to buy the tools, learn to use them, and get the finished product done. Although I do like your thought process of justifying new tools. :) Will have to try that on my wife in the future. :)
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