how to cut quarter round to meet in 3 right axes


You know when you see the representation of the x, y, z axes for Cartesian co-ordinate system. You can make the symbol with your fingers, like you're at a heavy metal concert. I need to make quarter round meet on the inside of a closet. The trim goes up the inside laying vertically on the 90 corners, and the same trim also meets going laying horizontally both left to right and front to back. To trim out the top square of whiteboard, which is the ceiling of the closet, and the peg board, the three sides. I know how to cut a 90 corner from the same trim to do the back of a closet, but how to put a third piece "normal" to those. Can you cut all 3 at an equal angle, or do you have to cope one(s) into the other(s)?
p.s. The quarter round isn't just plain quarter round. I made my own. I took a 3/8" beading bit to 1/2" x 1/2" plain quarter round, for a little more class. Leaves a 1/16" lip. More or less the same idea.
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bent wrote:

Cope it. First piece cut square and installed tight. Second piece, cut the trim on a 45, then cut off all of the mitered face with a jigsaw - undercut it a little, install. Third piece, cut the trim on 45s both ways, jigsaw (<noun made into a verb, sue me) off the mitered faces - you'll be left with a little tongue that comes to a point, install.
R
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not clear to me, show me
understand cut square tight understand 45 mitre understand double 45 mitre and comes to point. Q) are we talking equal and very pointy point?
Q) cut off mitre face /undercut , and cut off mitre face, respectively for the 45, & double 45 (sorry I'm Canadian & therefore slightly French; hence colour?): in the first case, is cut off mitre face /undercut 2 steps, possibly at the same time, and then are we talking exactly the same step(s) in the second case
Q) I don't understand cut off mitre face /undercut; is this a curved cut? I'm thinking....
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bent wrote:

It sounds like coping is new to you. Here's a primer on cope cuts: http://www.nwrenovation.com/12insidemoldingcorner.html
Does that help?
-Mike
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bent wrote:

Direct people much? Please and thanks are most effective words - do try them.
http://www.rd.com/content/openContent.do?contentId 891
R
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If you can't get the pieces to cope well you might consider setting a "plinth" in the corner. Cut a custom square block slightly taller than your base trim. Each mold can then be square cut to meet the block. ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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This isn't as bad/difficult as it seems.
Just treat each of the three surfaces (side, back, ceiling) as their own individual 90-degree two-way join.
The 'simplistic way' is to simply cut each join at a 45 degree miter. you'll have two such cuts on each piece of 'quarter round'. If the corner angles are not _all_ a "perfect" 90 degrees, you'll end up with minor (or maybe 'not so minor') gapping that will have to be 'filled'.
The 'right way' is to do 'coped' joints, instead of mitered ones. One piece (typically the _back-ceiling_ piece) is put in full width, with butt corners against the sidewalls.
the next piece (typically the side/ceiling) is then coped to fit snugly against the back-ceiling piece.
Then the last piece (typically, the side/back) is then coped to fit snugly, *first* against the back piece, and *second* against the side piece.
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