How to Clean Wood Glue?

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What's the best way to clean up some glue (e.g. Titebond II) that gets on the surface of wood, such as oak? Will a damp rag be good enough? I recently put some stain on some oak, and some areas containing residual glue marred the finish.
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Buck Turgidson wrote:

I prefer waiting until the glue gets to a rubbery snot consistency, then using a sharp chisel to carefully shave it off. The damp rag has never worked for me.
Barry
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I'll second this method - the first step though is not to use so much that it's squeezing out all over the place. Brush it on and take into account the type of joint when you put it on. If you're getting glue everywhere, you're using too much.
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Whats best to apply Titebond II and similar glues? Have used acid brush and cut down paint brushes. Kind of a PIA to use. Haven't found a source for "glue brushes". Any hints appreciated.
Mike B

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I keep a bunch of these around http://www.leevalley.com/garden/page.aspx?c=2&p327&cat=2,2180,41007
I'll clean them and re-use them but if I get side-tracked and forget, it's no big deal just to toss it.
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They do tend to shed bristles, though. Still, I keep a bag ful of them around too.
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I use the 3/8" acid brushes and toss them in a plastic cup filled with water to keep the glue from drying on them.
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RE: Subject
Classic Harbor Freight item.
Acid brushes when they are on sale.
I buy at least 30 at a pop, then use and pitch.
Life it too short to sweat the petty stuff of even pet the sweaty stuff.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Try cutting the bristles to half-length before use. I like them a lot better after cutting them.
Barry
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On Tue, 29 Nov 2005 01:28:36 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm, Lew

Horse hair or plastic bristled? I prefer the horse hair. Snip some short for tight spots where you want a precision dab. Paint can caps work well as containers for refilling the brush.

You hang with the wrong wimmenz, Lew.
--- - Sarcasm is just one more service we offer. - http://diversify.com Web Applications
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Whats best to apply Titebond II and similar glues? Have used acid brush and cut down paint brushes. Kind of a PIA to use. Haven't found a source for "glue brushes". Any hints appreciated.
Mike B

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A well-equipped art supply or crafts store should have good glue brushes.
nevems2 wrote:

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wrote:

For detailed stuff I like to use a little rod of scrap wood cut at an angle on the end. Can use the point to get in the tight spots, and the face of the angle to spread with. The nearest sink is up a flight of stairs, so a glue brush is pretty much guaranted to be use once and then in the trash for me. This way I can just keep cutting the end off to get a fresh end until it's too short to use. On larger pieces I'll apply the glue directly to the piece and use the stick to spread it, for small stuff I'll squeeze out a blob on the back of a used up piece of sandpaper and dip. Works for me.
-Leuf
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I also use whats commonly called an acid brush. Since my nearest water source is a distance away, I keep a small pail of water nearby with a small sponge and an old washcloth for cleanups. Usually, I will toss the brush in the pail at the end of the glue session. Many times, they can be reused, but it seems lately that I got a batch where the bristles fall out easily.
The one glue accessory that I have really latched on to is a bottle with a wide roller tip. This saves so much time in certain instances that I think that I could not do without it now.
Lou

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Here is my solution to glue marks:
Use hide glue. Unless you are using a dark stain, any undetected glue marks usually blend into the finish.
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I generally use the same small brushes plumbers use to apply flux to a pipe. Check the plumbing aisle! They are cheap and disposable too. --dave

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Damm, I came here looking for great insight and inspiration. Seriously, thanks for all the comments, seems like I'm doing exactly what you are are. Thanks again.
Mike B

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@ableweb.net says...

I picked this tip up from Rob Cosman's video on making hand cut dovetails: he uses a flexible artist's knife for applying white glue. The knives are very cheap and in this situation at least are far better than acid brushes which I buy in quantity whenever the woodworking show arrives in town.
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says...

they're called palette knives. you can buy them in different shapes and lengths.
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scribbled:

Index finger, which then get wiped on seat of pants and eventually applied to best couch/chair seat, resulting in divorce. I also use scraps of wood. Lately this has been a bunch 1/2"-wide strips of 1/8 baltic birch ply, 6 or 7 inches long.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Woodworking
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