How do I build a light cover into a ceiling tile grid?


I have a dual 8 foot fluorescent light fixture in my basement (F96T12/C50, single posts, 75W x 2). I want to install some ceiling tiles, incl. T-supports, hangers, etc. So I have to pick the height and location. Currently the lights/fixture is the lowest height level in the room. It is attached directly (perpendicular) to the floor joists (2x10s), screwed directly up against them. Its positioning is correct and it is not practical to gain more height than the bottom of these bulbs.
The fixture is a sealed sheet metal rectangle. It is wired downward from an octagon box above, which is screwed to one joist. I am not interested in this part. There is no reflector shield on the top/side of it. The 2 bulbs are just exposed. I am planning on putting a cover/shield/ flat piece of plastic into the ceiling tile grid. I am wondering about the proper way to do this. I am not sure whether to make a wooden surround frame (shroud), and put my cover in it, and ceiling tile grid built around it, or if I can make the plastic cover part of the ceiling tile grid T-support structure. But is it possible to build a T-bar grid for the cover into the main grid structure (same level)? The matter is what is safe/ to code w/r/t materials/gaps/methods. I guess there is not much heat.
The entire room is 68" wide and the 5" wide fixture is 38" and 30" to the sides. (small direction of room).
The entire room is 164" long and the 96" long fixture is 82" and 84" to the ends. (large direction of room).
The room is a rectangle, except there is a J-shaped duct to build completely around in one quadrant. I'll use the 2x4 foot ceiling tiles; the rectangleness of the ceiling tile is installed perpendicular to the rectangleness of the room (right?).
Anything helps, Thanks
Sorry, I got no help i n a.b.c; hey, theres wood involved
-
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an
and
a
Just get the plastic light diffusers and put them in the grid the same way you put a tile in.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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There are many styles of lamps that come with a finishing bezel. Check with a lighting store. Be aware that fluorescent lamp ballasts are notorious for going bad and overheating. They are a distinct fire hazard and should be installed according to the applicable electrical and fire codes. Bugs
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Bugs wrote:
> Be aware that fluorescent lamp ballasts are notorious for going bad and > overheating. They are a distinct fire hazard and should be installed > according to the applicable electrical and fire codes.
Class "P" ballasts have been around for at least 35 years.
Class "P" among other things includes a thermal cut out which opens turning off the ballast when it over heats.
When the ballasts cools down, the thermal cut out, allowing the lamp to restrike.
This cycling indicates it's time for a new ballast as well as lamps, especially if the ends of the lamps are blackened.
Lew
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> Bugs wrote: > > > Be aware that fluorescent lamp ballasts are notorious for going bad and > > overheating. They are a distinct fire hazard and should be installed > > according to the applicable electrical and fire codes.
Lew Hodgett wrote:
> Class "P" ballasts have been around for at least 35 years. > > Class "P" among other things includes a thermal cut out which opens > turning off the ballast when it over heats. > > When the ballasts cools down, the thermal cut out, allowing the lamp to > restrike. > > This cycling indicates it's time for a new ballast as well as lamps, > especially if the ends of the lamps are blackened.
The mind is the second thing to go. <G>
Yes, Class P ballasts are provided with a thermal cut out; however, it is a one time device.
If the cut out opens, ballast shows open circuit on a meter, time for a new ballast.
Recycling happens with HID lighting when end of lamp life approaches.
Sorry for the inconvenience.
Lew
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While doing the obligatory preliminary AutoCAD drawing it became obvoius that I need to move this to the exact center, even though it is only 4" off one way & 1" the other in the entire room. The long (4') of the 2' x 4' tiles are supposed to run perpendicular to the long dim of the room, so I need to cut just two tiles to cover the width of the room. I think I'll just treat it as a structural thing, rather than an electrical problem. I haven't looked at the main Tee product, etc. to know if I can hang the cover's | -[]- | at the same level, using these main Tee & cross Tees AS the support for the cover, all hung. Or if I need to build a shroud, whether above. level, or below, to mount the wall Tee around.
I am planning to put Roxul Safe & Sound directly above it, and every other sq. in, including some other insul rated pot lights and oct take-off boxes, but as far as I know this Roxul product is safe as houses.
Do I need a vented cover? Like the shiny chrome-like square hole stuff, or can it be solid. I was planning solid.
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bent wrote:

Either way works. I like the parabolic reflectors as they don't cut out so much light, focus the light down where you need it and reduce glare on TV and computer screens. They also look better.
R
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Class "P" among other things includes a thermal cut out which opens turning off the ballast when it over heats.
When the ballasts cools down, the thermal cut out, allowing the lamp to
restrike.
The cutout works fine until it fuses and sets the house on fire. Bugs, former fire chief
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Bugs wrote:
> > The cutout works fine until it fuses and sets the house on fire. > Bugs, former fire chief >
As indicated in my corrected post, the cut out is a one time device. It fails to provide an open circuit.
Just curious, what time frame when these houses had a fire attributed to a ballast failure.
Lew
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