How can I determine if magnetic starter (switch) on my Grizzly 1023 is damaged?

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I have not been able to start a Griz 1023 saw that I recently bought used (and yes, it ran in the garage of the guy I purchased it from). I moved it on a trailer about 30 miles, so it's possible that the starter could be damaged if they are delicate. I have no experience with these magnetic starters.
I detect current at the switch. I checked all the wiring connections to the motor and blew/vac'd out the extra dust. Everything 'seems' ok there.
Is there a way to test the switch without taking it out and wiring it to something else?
Any troubleshooting advice would be much appreciated. I don't want to order a replacement starter if it isn't the problem.
Thanks, Jeff
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Jeff
More details needed. What voltage are you using and what voltage is the saw setup for? Are you positive of the connections where the saw is connected to? Is there any action at the saw starter, switch or motor? Any smoke? A lot of saws are in everyday use and not connected properly, having been cheated to make them go and never correctly connected.
If nothing happened on the way home the likely problem is the hookup. If something did happen the likely problems are almost unlimited. What I do in this case is to take it all apart, the electrical that is, and start again.
A shot in the dark is the capacitor switch in the motor but if it was that the motor would probably hum or smoke.
So more details please.
Bob AZ
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wrote:

If you've got voltage into the switch, and no voltage out of the switch then something in the switch is defective. You'll have to open the switch to determine whether the problem is in the switch(s) that feeds the contactor coil or in the contactor/relay itself.
If you have the proper voltage out of the switch, and the connections to the switch and the motor are good, you should have the proper voltage at the input to the motor. If not, the problem is in the wiring between the switch and the motor.
If you have the proper voltage at the motor, and the motor gives no indication of getting power; tries to turn over, hums, etc., then the problem is in the motor. Look for a reset button on the motor case somewhere. If the magnetic switch is just that, a magnetic switch instead of a starter that contains an overload/overtemp breaker, the motor should have its own internal overtemp protection. There should be some notation to that effect on the motor dataplate. It could be shown as either auto or manual. If manual there will be a reset button somewhere on the motor. If auto, it should reset itself after the motor has cooled.
If the motor does give some indication of receiving power but won't start and come up to speed, the problem could be nothing more than a bad capacitor in the motor. Not likely because if that were the case, you'd probably be blowing a circuit breaker.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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On Sep 9, 1:31 am, Tom Veatch wrote:

Thanks for all the info. I will check it out tonight after I struggle through another six hours at my day job. :( Haha.
I know that I do have the proper voltage to the switch. So I'll do the checking past that to the motor. There is absolutely no indication from the motor that it receives power though. I will post another note when I find out more information.
Jeff
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JJ wrote: ...

Are you absolutely sure of that -- that is, are you sure your shop is on same source voltage as the shop from which it came? (IE, I wouldn't trust the cord plug as an indicator necessarily of 120V instead of 240V as I've seen more than once the voltage on the motor be changed w/o changing the plug on the pre-made cord).
Also, there are "heaters" (really fusible links) in the starter -- check for continuity there--if there were a problem it's possible when you first tried it they opened.
--
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I guess I wouldn't bet my life on it, but I'm pretty certain the saw hasn't been rewired to run at 120V. All the wiring at the motor and the starter looks to be 'stock' and unmodified.
I will check the heaters as well. Thanks.
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I just wanted to verify that I'm testing for voltage downstream of the switch correctly. If you look at page 53 in the current 1023 manual (or 55 of 72 of the http://www.grizzly.com/images/manuals/g1023sl_m.pdf), that echoes what my wiring looks like.
So the way I read that diagram and the way I see it wired, I should only see voltage at the 1/2 and 5/6 leads on the Thermanl Overload Relay WHEN I switch the saw on. Correct?
I confirmed that I do see voltage at L1/1 and L3/5 when I have the saw plugged in.
So, if my assertion about the 1/2 and 5/6 TOR leads is correct, then there is something definitely wrong with the starter, correct?
Thanks all, Jeff
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So the section that has the on button. On the top it should read 120 to ground or neutral. When you press the button post B of that switch should go to 120.
When you state that you see voltage you are really stating nothing. You could be reading 3 volts which is not going to get anything running. You should say I read 240v between L1/1 and L3/5 and 120 v between L1/1 and ground and 120v between L3/5 and ground. I read 120v at the top of the On button and 120v at the bottom of the on button. Just need to confirm actual voltage and not some glow light hinting that it sees some voltage which may not be enough or proper wired. If you have 120 and 240 then the contactor may have failed. Or maybe the thermal overload failed.
wrote:

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On Sep 13, 3:48pm, Jim Behning

FYI...for the other person responding to this, the saw is 3hp, 240v, single phase.
I am seeing 120v between L1/1 and ground. And also 120v between L3/5 and ground. However, I am most definitely NOT seeing any volts between L1/1 and L3/5.
Thanks for all the input! Jeff
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Jeff
From the information posted in this reply and if the saw wiring and cable is wired correctly your/the source of power is 110 volts and/or the receptacle that your cable is connected to is wired incorrectly. Check the voltage at the receptacle where your saw is connected to. It should NOT be a conventional 110 volt receptacle.
Bob AZ
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JJ wrote:

In the US, a 240 volt circuit come from a transformer winding that is 'center tapped'. The center tap is connected to ground/neutral at the distribution panel. The result is equivalent to two 120 volt circuits. The two 120 volt circuits are 180 degrees out of phase. I.e. one circuit is going positive while the other is going negative. The result is 240 volts between the hot sides of the two circuits.
You have indicated that you have 120 volts between the two outputs and ground. That is consistent with normal expectations. However the fact that you are seeing no voltage between the two output says that something is strange. One plausible cause is that your '240' volt supply did not come from two 120 volt circuits that are 180 degrees out of phase. If, instead, the two circuits are in phase (0 degrees) you would see the result that you have.
Check your supply, verify that you have 240 volts between the two hot wires.
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wrote:

So are you using a L6-30 plug? Does the receptacle show 240 volts between the hot legs? Did your electrician run a brand new 10 gauge romex attached to a brand new double pole breaker? An amatuer electrician might say hot is hot and try to jumper both hot legs. Or he might hook both hot wires to the same leg on a breaker. Those people are not called electricians though. ;-)
http://www.levitonproducts.com/catalog/dept_id_1001.htm?sid CC88804D1ECAE472CF657872DB6F7C&pid08
Oops, asked already.
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On Sep 14, 10:30 pm, Jim Behning

Yes, he put in a L6-30 receptacle and a matching plug on the saw. I'll check the voltage across the hot legs at the receptacle when I get home tonight. I suspect it will be the same as in the switch (each hot to the ground will be 120v, but nothing across the hots). And yes, he ran new 10/2 cable from a double pole breaker to the new receptacle.
So, if each hot leg is supplying 120v, and they are coming off a double pole breaker, does it make any sense for no volts across the two hots? Could this be a bad breaker?
Jeff
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More likely either not really a double pole breaker, or it was installed in the wrong slot in the panelbox. Some panelboxes only provide stubs for double pole breakers in certain positions.
scott
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"Scott Lurndal" wrote:

All panel boxes will only allow 2P c'bkrs to be installed in true 2P locations.
That said, there was a time when certain manufacturers provided handle tie kits that could be improperly installed on a pair of 1P c'bkrs which does not provide a 240V ck't, but rather a a 120V ck't.
Lew
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I've seen examples that allow 2P breakers installed in non-2p slots, particularly last 60's/early 70's GE panelboxes.
I personally prefer Square-D which have never allowed that.
scott
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"Scott Lurndal" wrote:

As somebody responsible for the sale of GE loadcenters during the above time period, I can guarantee that you could not install a 2P GE c'bkr in an incorrect position in the loadcenter.
Engineering kept emphasizing to sales that this was a design feature and should be pointed out to customers.
You must be confusing GE loadcenters with another manufacturer.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Maybe my 1991 GE load center is defective.
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"B A R R Y" wrote:

Possible, but wonder if the installing contractor may have played some games.
A proper 2P c'bkr will have a common internal trip in addition to the handle tie.
The insulating plastic that supports the buss bars has stubs sticking up that reject placing a 2P device in the wrong location.
Some c'bkr manufacturers for a while offered a handle tie kit that would allow you to handle tie non GE, 1P c'bkrs together but didn't have a common internal trip.
Breaking off the interfering stop, improperly handle tying 1P c'bkrs are just a couple of the possible explanations.
Without inspecting the hardware, it is pure speculation.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Thanks!
I'm going to be opening the panel in the next week or two as I run a new DC feed. I'll look and report back.
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