Hot rod table saw

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A crap motor? Please Toller - don't do this to yourself.
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-Mike-
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Actually Toller, if you weren't so interested in sounding like a wise ass know it all, you'd have double checked and realized he said no such thing. He clearly stated that the motor simply died. He also stated that he was pleasantly surprised by the difference in how fast the new motor came up to speed compared to the old. This - to the casual observer, says that his motor problems were completely unrelated to the blade. The only reference he made to a blade was that he installed a new one at the same time as the motor. I guess that new blade made that new motor spin up faster than the old blade huh? Must have something to do with impedance and start current.
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-Mike-
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Don't be silly. The set of the teeth makes the difference. If they are wide, they offer more wind resistance and slow down the motor. Personally, I use a thin kerf blade for two reasons. The savings on wood is enough to put one of my grandkids through college, and the faster spin up time allows me to get two more projects a year done.
PS: Run that drill press 10% faster and you gain two hours sleep when you change to daylight savings time.
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wrote:

Hmmm... So, if I run it backwards, I can fix mistakes.
Fix mistakes...
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Please specify the speed required to run backwards and fix mistakes.
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-Mike-
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Mike Marlow wrote:

Not enough information to answer your question!
How big are the mistakes and how pressed for time are you? ;)
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Think like a man - we never do anything half way.
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-Mike-
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Is that what the Delta Unsaw is for? Damn, got to get one. Hank
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On Sat, 29 Apr 2006 08:07:44 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

I was hoping Ed knew that...
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It's pretty darn fast if you can believe the Superman comics an movies
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Full speed will work, but be sure to keep the door open as the DC must also be run backwards at the same time.
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wrote:

See? I told you guys that Ed would know...
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Depends on the _size_ of the mistake, obviously.
For minor tasks, you can get away with a few hundred <r>epairs <p>er <m>inute.
For the errors *you* make, on the other hand,.......
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wrote in message

Damn! I always suspected these things but never ran into anyone who could verify they were true.
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-Mike-
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Charley wrote: An open motor on a table saw is just looking for trouble, SNIP
Ok, this I gotta disagree with - it smacks of the same argument that's been passed around a bunch of times about the DC's exploding from sucking dust.
My Craftsman TS has had the same open motor hanging off the back it came with 50 years ago, and it hasn't exploded or burned anyone's house down yet. Heck, it never even seems to get hot. I know that many older contractors saws came with open motors, and even some of the newer cheaper ones with the universal motors that are stuck up under the table have open housings. None of those are exploding or burning the owner's houses down.
While dust may be a hazard under certain circumstances, the speed at which that dust blows through this motor is at such high velocity and with so much air going in with it I just do not believe it is an issue.
BTW, this TS has been used all that time without any dust collection at all, unless you can count the old burlap bag hanging off the bottom - so yes the motor has been exposed to a large amount of dust over the years.
FWIW I am not advocating forgoing safety and common sense. Just that some things are straw men issues.
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Charley wrote: >and using the original switch that was probably intended for 1 >horsepower and 120 volts on the new 3 horse motor also spells disaster.
Just wanted to add that I fully agree with this part - the OP is asking for disaster with this one. The original switch was a good one when it was made, but by today's standards it is not a high quality switch. In addition it is old and most likely worn, and I just cannot believe it is not seriously under-rated for the new 3hp motor.
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Oh my, you'd better tell the people at Delta about that.
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wrote:

I won't go quite the gloom-and-doom route of other posters, but I will point out some things that you may not be aware of:
A 3 hp motor is serious overkill for a contractor type saw. Due to the design of the motor mount, the only tension provided on the single belt is from the weight of the motor. Because of the single belt and only moderate tension available (and varies with the height of the blade) a lot of your 3 hp (probably half--maybe more) will never make it to the blade. A true 1 hp (not a Sears 4 hp "developed") motor would have been plenty. When I replaced the motor on mine many years ago, I used a 1 hp and never found it inadequate.
#8 wire? Good grief. #12 would have been absolutely fine, although no one would have shaken their head at #10. But #8? Total waste of your money. Also, good luck getting that wire into anything rated at 20 amps.
If your testing was a rip, then your new rip blade would account for quite a bit of the difference in performance you noted.
The switch. A lot depends on what kind of switch was originally there. My old Craftsman had a simple toggle switch; sort of like the kind you'd find on a radio. It seemed fairly heavy duty, but it just looked like a toy compared to one of those cool green-on/red-off switches, which would be okay for your motor. If it was one of the more modern switches that Sears used on their saws, jointers, etc., it's probably okay (so long as it's a DPST). However, if the contacts were only rated at say 10 amps (not unlikely for the original 1 hp motor), it's not beefy enough for the 3 hp current draw. You need to look at the ratings on the switch.
Marathon motors are considered decent, but with that open frame, don't look for a long life. That was a good price for a 3 hp Marathon, but not really the right motor for the saw.
--
LRod

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wire for anything over 25 feet as I recall.

Yes, I believe I made that point.

Yea, I realized after I posted I should have put a disclaimer in about the switch. All I need is a magnetic starter. Sometimes you can find used ones pretty cheap, especially 3-phase, which of course work fine for single phase also. If I ever find one, I promise to install it to make you guys feel better.

Hey, good for you!
-Tony-
Shamelessly hotrodding everything he could get his hands on since WAY before that! http://pages.prodigy.net/tjester/index.html
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wrote:

Okay, then answer this for me: in your original post you said, "I wired in a dedicated 20 amp recepticle and bought 35 feet of #8 SJT with large twist-lock plug and used the original power switch."
I read that as the 20 amp receptacle was wired with 12 ga wire, true? If so, then you accomplish nothing by plugging 8 ga wire into that circuit. It's like coupling a 2" fire hose to a 3/4" garden hose. You're not going to get anything more out of that 2" hose than can be delivered through the intervening 3/4" hose.
What does the label on the motor say for FLA (full load amps)? Very likely 15-18. Even if it were the truest 3 hp motor on the planet, and operating under a constant heavy load (not possible with the contractor saw lashup) it might still run on a 20 amp circuit (12 ga wire) and would be absolutely comfortable on a 30 amp circuit (10 ga wire). Even 5 hp machinery is happy on a 30 amp circuit. This is what I'm getting at; 8 ga is way over the top. Toller must have written those instructions, that's how unrealistic it is.
I don't fault you for "following instructions", I'm just saying it was a waste of resources.
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LRod

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