Home built woodworking machines

While digging through my stash of reading material the other day, I ran across a book from the "Fine Woodworking on..." series called "Making and Modifying Machines". It gives pretty detailed information on building several shop machines like a panel saw, wooden jointer, oscillating spindle sander, thickness sander...even a wooden table saw.
From the editor's introduction:
    "The very idea of making your own machinery may seem daringly audacious, but why not? The keys are the modern electric motor, readily available in any size, the ball-bearing pillow-block,              and the common bolt. We can use the motor to whirl any kind of         cutter. then we devise auxiliary mechanisms for managing the              cutter's movement into the workpiece, like a boring machine, or          for controlling the work's movement into the cutter, like a          tablesaw with fences. And then there is the lathe which,              uniquely, rotates the workpiece into a stationary cutter."
The book's really got me thinking...why don't more of us build our own machines?
Like many of you, I built my own router table system. It's as accurate as any production model and it fits ME and MY style of working. I've built countless jigs, auxiliary fences, tables, etc. to improve the safety and/or accuracy of about every tool I own. Google this newsgroup about nearly any woodworking machine, and you'll get loaded down with improvements or work-arounds that wreckers have made to it so it better meets their needs.
So has anyone out there built or used a homemade woodworking machine? I'd be interested in hearing and/or seeing about your experience or ideas on the subject.
--
Larry G. Laminger
http://woodworks.laminger.com
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On Sun, 14 Dec 2003 22:32:18 -0600, Larry Laminger wrote:

do than how much it is worth or the appeal of having a "new" machine. I have a doweling machine that I built using a cheap drill press and building around it. Handmade scroll saws are among the best I have seen. I have used a home built table saw that was based on a simple grinding arbor and did not tilt. It was rock solid at 90 degrees and cut straight and true. We used it for ripping lumber. Probably the best home built machine I have used was a table saw that a coworker had that he used to cut laminated plastic. It was a 10" table saw built into a table that was 6 1/2' wide x 8' long. He had a fence that extended the whole 96", worked on a rack and pinion system and tracked 50" to the right of the blade with an accuracy of a couple of thousandths parallel and could simply be picked up and set off of the saw.
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I haven't, but my FIL made a very nice 1" belt sander. He made it out of aluminum. A motor, bearing, simple tracking system, a frame, and a table is all it takes. I've thought about a spindle sander, but oscillating ones are so cheap now it doesn't seem worth the effort to build a none-oscillating one. I'd feel more comfortable with purchased tools for most things. Either accuracy or safety would be more important than saving a few bucks.
--
Larry C in Auburn, WA

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Larry, I built a wood lathe, first a treadle lathe, then when I got tired of pumping the treadle I built another that has a 1/2 hp motor.Fairly easy to do, although you must be precise making the headstock and sliding tailstock. I took the treadle lathe apart and use the stand for several things. A slow speed grinder and roller stand are two of the applications. The lathe is used for spindle turning, haven't tried bowls yet. I am a little more than a novice on the lathe, but enjoy the heck out of it. I built a walking beam saw about 5 years ago, when I bought a 16" bandsaw I took the beamsaw apart as it took up a lot of room.I am thinking about making another one that would be outside for sawing logs into planks. The beam saw is slow but does work. I have 7 3/4" of rip capacity on the bandsaw so the walking beamsaw would come in handy for bigger stuff. Last thing I made was a handtool , a froe. Hard to find old tools like this, easily made from a length of car spring. Mike
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| | While digging through my stash of reading material...
I'm reminded of a noted organ builder who designed a seven-bladed saw monstrosity himself in order to automate some of the fabrication of wind chest components. One drops in the stock and out comes, in Looney Tunes fashion, a completed component sawn to spec.
--Jay
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When i was a kid, I used to ride my bike to the corner store to buy candy. The Guy who had the store used to work in his shop and you would have to go get him to ring you out. I remember that he had a homemade band saw. He used 2 volkswagon beatle whells and hubs, and tires. the tires were groved for the saw blade and there was a huge plywood table.. I would love to have that now.

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Yahoo group has a group on home built machines.
Larry Laminger wrote:

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