HF Multifunction tool

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David Nebenzahl wrote:

I know for certain that the Fein MultiMaster can use the Dremel saw blades as I bought one of the Dremel blades for use about two weeks ago. $11.00 for the Dremel blade at Home Depot verses $26.00 for the Fein at Woodcraft.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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So Jack, I guess the question that has to be asked, are the Dremel blades as good or at comparible in quality to the Fein in practical use?
Also, I am remembering some discussion on another group of the problems with blades loosening up on the Dremels when being used. A call to Dremel ( IF I am remembering correctly) got the individual some kind of star washer or other arrangment to help remedy that problem.
Anyway, have you had a chance to use the Dremel blades, and more importantly, do you like them? I wouldn't expect Fein quality at half the price, but wonder if the blades are just more Chinese crap.
Robert
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So Jack, I guess the question that has to be asked, are the Dremel blades as good or at comparible in quality to the Fein in practical use?
Also, I am remembering some discussion on another group of the problems with blades loosening up on the Dremels when being used. A call to Dremel ( IF I am remembering correctly) got the individual some kind of star washer or other arrangment to help remedy that problem.
Anyway, have you had a chance to use the Dremel blades, and more importantly, do you like them? I wouldn't expect Fein quality at half the price, but wonder if the blades are just more Chinese crap.
Robert
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They loosen up on the Fein (model I bought lo these many years ago), they don't cut flesh (showed my wife this just two days ago), and they Bend. Had to pound one flat for work this week. When I bought mine it was over priced and I suspect it still is. I'd buy the HF Chinese Crap, just make sure you clean off the Cosmoline/CatPee before use. If you have cats or dogs (well, any mammal with a nose), get the box into the recycling right quick. They use Cat Pee in the cardboard glue. Same stuff they use in the plywood. I'm thinking they got a Lot of cats in China ...
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

There's not much "quality" in any of the blades. The blade is a flat piece of metal whose business end is serrated. In every way, the teeth look like they were fashioned by pinking shears!
Don't think of the blade as a typical saw.
The "teeth" are not sharpened, set, or even very pointy. Now the teeth COULD be harder, but that would make the blade more brittle. Probably what they've got is a rough trade-off between durability and total failure.
On the plus side, when the teeth DO wear down, you've got a new scraper.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

So far I've only used it to under cut four door jambs while installing a laminate floor. As far as I can tell the blade works as well as the Fein. I did not have a problem with the Dremel blade loosening on the Fein any more than a Fein blade. You do have to tighten the set screw securely on both blades. I did like not having to completely remove the screw to install or remove the blade. It's only a minor convenience but one that was noted.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Nova wrote:

Note that the current Fein models address both of these issues--there is now a star shaped arbor that prevents the blade from shifting and there is now a quick release instead of a set screw. There is an adapter that adds the new arbor to the older models--it has carbide teeth on the back that cut into the flat arbor to ensure that it stays put, or if you want to be really sure it can be spot welded.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Right. Fein's patent on the original tool expired - which generates a ton of competition - so they make some needed improvements and get another seventeen years of exclusivity with a new patent.
For those who decry monopolies, remember monopolies are encouraged by the Constitution (Article I, Section 8). "The Congress shall have the Power To....securing for limited times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries."
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wrote:

Without which there would be no improvement.

Well, invention is Constitutionally encouraged. The limited patent monopoly is a means to reward invention; a fair tradeoff, IMO.
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krw wrote:

Yes but in China they encourage the opposite.
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wrote:

...and if everyone did as China does?
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I wouldn't hafta pay $20 for a music CD of a 45 yr old album.
nb
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You don't hafta pay it now.
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HeyBub wrote:

"monopolies are encouraged" is an interesting way to look at protection of intellectual property. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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That is exactly the deal with a patent or copyright. The inventor (or author) gets a monopoly for a limited period of time in return for putting the work in the public domain at the end of that time. Copyright times have gotten way too long in my opinion, but that is a side detail.
If an inventor wants to protect something indefinitely, they can keep it as a trade secret (like the formula for Coca-Cola). But that doesn't protect them from independent invention.
-- Doug
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Douglas Johnson wrote:

I don't think it's fair or accurate to equate design patents with monopolies.
Your cola analogy was good in distinguishing between monopoly and design patents. A monopoly would mean there is one company making and selling all the Cola in the country. A patent just means Joe's Cola is the only one who can make and sell his patented, steroid enriched "Rage-a-Cola"
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-MIKE-

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The line you are trying to draw is based on the breadth of the patent. If Coke had gotten a patent on Cola, there would only be one company making and selling all the Cola in the country for the life of the patent. OK, they could license it to other companies if they wanted.
For some time in the 40's and 50's, there was only one company making and selling color film -- Kodak. A decade later, there was only one company making and selling plain paper copiers -- Xerox.
-- Doug
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Douglas Johnson wrote:

I don't have a problem with that. It's a new invention.... their idea. In Kodaks case, there was still B&W film. People could still take photographs and make money at it. In Xerox's case, there were still mimeographs and other ways to reproduce things.
They should be protected for a while to profit from their idea/invention. I think we agree more than we disagree. I think patents are good to protect someone's invention.
But calling it a monopoly is like saying the guy who invents the combo drill-saw-nailer, is now the only one allowed to sell all tools.
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-MIKE-

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wrote:

"Design patent"? A design patent would be used to protect the look of a table, for instance. The "cola" patent wouldn't be a "design patent". ...or maybe I misunderstand your point.

No a "design patent" might protect the shape of the bottle. Coke could have gotten a patent on cocaine-laced soda with a normal patent but it would have had to teach Pepsi how to make it; the exact trade-off the Constitution instructs Congress to set up. However, like with everything else, congress is the antonym of progress.
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krw wrote:

Semantics. I think my point was clear.
Just because someone patents a tool, doesn't mean they have a monopoly on tools.
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-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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-MIKE- wrote:

Well, that's the way it was put to us in ConLaw class. Don't forget, monopolies are, in the main, good.
And about the only monopolies that are bad for the consumer are those that are government-controlled or owned (i.e., utilities, postal service, etc.).
Even the arch-demon of monopolies, Standard Oil, managed to lower the price of Kerosene from $3.00/gallon to 5/gallon ! And they did it in three years. Of course the suppliers of whale oil were put out of business - and complained lustily - but Standard Oil pushed back the night.
No longer did we have to have sex in the dark.
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