Granite Router Table Top

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I am curious, if some one were to manufcture granite router table tops would you be interested in buying one? I am thinking that they would be the perfect material, so sag like MDF tops and no rust like cast iron tops. What do you think. I am just looking for some opinions or ideas.
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Granitebear wrote:

Seems like this was just raised no too long ago???
I have two thoughts, both tending towards the negative--cost would likely be moderately high and the material is brittle for the application.
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That is why Hanstone, Cambria, Silestone all would be better suited than granite...no brittleness there.
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Engineered stone would be a better choice.. aka quartz. There are plenty of slabs available, usually end-cuts and sink/cooktop cut-outs. The main reason eStone would be better, is that it holds a variety of fasteners better, and can be machined to thinner dimensions while staying very strong.
That kind of material makes for great router table tops.
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On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 12:28:55 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

Do you know anyone who could make one to order? <G>
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On Feb 15, 3:53pm, "Bonehenge (B A R R Y)"

I'll ask around..<G>
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On Feb 15, 3:53pm, "Bonehenge (B A R R Y)"

Would 17 x 26, or sometimes 18 x 28 be a good size? They'd run from 55 - 70 pounds. Minus the cut-out for the router body. The body has to be brought up to a thinner spot than the customary 1.25" thickness. God forbid I'd tempt anybody to use a router-bit extender. Maybe a router plate would have to be used.. like a Lee Valley.
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On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 14:12:56 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

An 18x28 would work for me, as my current 1-1/2" (2x3/4") MDF top is 20x30. My plate is a Rousseau, which has been fine for 5 years. The cutout for the plate has a 3/4" wide rabbet that the plate drops into.
How do you cut and rout that stuff?
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On Feb 16, 8:33am, "Bonehenge (B A R R Y)"

With a 10 HP spindle, diamonds, and lots of water.
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wrote:

http://www.animationusa.com/picts/hbpict/3_Rock-Stars.jpg
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You'd lose a lot of accuracy with an extender. Steel City is offering table saws with granite tops. I've got a request in for a bit more information than the web site or press releases include, but it sounds interesting: I've been fighting rust, usually successfully, on table saw tops since I was 15, and I wouldn't mind a break, but I'm worried about fragility...my guess is, though, that if it makes it to your shop in one piece, and you get it set up, fragility is no longer a worry. And you have another place to rest coffee mugs.
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Just don't peen over any rivets on it.
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There are problems with granite, concrete, fab. stone etc. but not with work transport or flatness. Would love to have a table with Black granite as the surface. ********************** \Routers = patwarner.com ******************************8

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Sounds good to me, but you'd have to provide a fair bit of customization as people will probably want to use different lifts, plates, routers, etc.
JP
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Miter slot, ....
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Doesn't really seem worth the effort. If the only advantage is rust and sag then I'd say no. If you are having a sag problem you can just build a torsion box or double up some 3/4 MDF and add a few cross braces. Also, the stone has disadvantages. I suppose the slot would wear after a while, so you need to figure how to mount a track anyway. If you want to add some custome fence, you won't have an easy time cutting a new slot or two. If you wnat to customize the router plate hol or add a hole and counter bore for a lift screw, not so easy. Not sure really how slick stone would be, even when polished. I would much prefer an easily replacable, cheap, slick, and customizable laminate top. Sounds like a solution looking for a problem.

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I don't foresee the need of a track. This top is slicker than anything else and flat.
To each his own, I guess.
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/TSToy.jpg
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http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/TSToy.jpg
Wow, Your 3D skills are legendary.
That is the best drawing you have done yet. The wall with the pegboard and sawblades are particularly realistic! Good job!
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wrote:

I had to poke all those holes, with an awl, (DigitalAwl V 2.0) A lot of work. The blades were SAWZcad version 14 for UNIX.
Oh... and thank you.
btw.. no comments on my skillls with BagCAD on the DC?
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Better a shaper, with a motor designed specifically for use with a thick top. That, or infill material for Spiers or Norris pattern bench planes. Green parrot's wing agate would be nifty looking, though costly -- assuming you actually care about cost.
Note that unless wrung, really heavy, really flat block-shaped things tend to glide across each other as if floating on air.
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