Glues and Their Proper Storage

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Store all perishables at the...store!
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I have found that old CA glue, though not solid, is not as good as fresh CA. Several times I've used CA from an old container and wished I'd have just opened a fresh one. At least for borderline applications.
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Hello TMT:
I have had very little success storing the cyanoacrylate adhesives (Krazy glue or Super Glue) that come in the tiny tubes. It hardens after the first or second use.
The larger half-ounce or 1 oz bottles from hobby stores seem to last much better, even at room temperature. They do have a tendency to polymerize at the tip and the lid fills up with crud, but cutting off the tip and using the fine tips that the hobby store has, seems to help. I used a 1/2 oz bottle of thin CA for about six months.....it ran out before it went bad.
Best -- Terry
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On 27 Jan 2006 09:53:08 -0800, "Too_Many_Tools"

Most of these glues will keep up to 2 years if kept tightly closed and at room temperatures. Elmer's glue will thicken if it freezes. Personally, I try not to buy much more glue than I can use within 12 months. Some glues have a shorter shelf life.
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Must be sorry you asked the question by now - who said anything about caulk? Anyway, CA glue ( like urethane glue, i.e Gorilla glue) cues in the presences of moister. Air contains moister so its important to get as much air out of the container as possible before you store it. Since it chemically cures rather than drying by evaporation, the fridge is a good idea since most chemical reactions are directly proportionally to temp. Also, store the container upside down so the air in the container is 'at the bottom' and not the top where you're trying to get the glue out.
Yellow glue is a similar problem for a different reason. It cures through evaporation which air in the container will facilitate. Again, squeeze the air out. It will thicken if frozen and Titebond says you can remedy this by stirring. If it thickens without freezing I'd say its started curing and there's little hope of reviving it. Having said this, Titebond claims its shelf life in years. So I think air is the problem if you glue is thickening.
I have to admit ignorance on contact cement, but I assume it could be revived with the relevant solvent (lacquer thinner?) since you have to worry about releasing contact cement glued veneer by spraying lacquer on it.
My glues are all store on their heads with the air (well most of it) squeezed out it.

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If cyanoacrylic glue reacts to moisture, it follows that we should only use it in humidity-controlled rooms, and shoot some moisture removing inert gas into the bottle after use. CO2 is easy to obtain, or, if you own a MIG welder, you've got a bottle of argon handy. It also follows that it should have greater shelf life once opened in Arizona (low humidity) than in Florida (off the scale humidity). Is this so? If it is, is it worth all the trouble? Just buy smaller bottles of glue and build faster! :-)
Max Mahanke wrote:

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Geoff Sanders wrote:

It does not cure with moisture. It is an anaerobic glue.
Dan
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snipped-for-privacy@krl.org wrote:

I think moisture is necessary, Dan.
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snipped-for-privacy@krl.org wrote:

thread locking compounds like Loctite are anaerobic
Dave
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Dan Sorry, it does cure in the presence of moisture; from Henkel-Loctite's MSDS for cyanoacrylate glues: Polymerized by contact with water, alcohols, amines, alkalies. Loctite thread locking agents such as 222, 241, 270 are anaerobic adhesives however. Martin .-- martin<dot here>whybrow<at here>ntlworld<dot here>com
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You are right. I looked it up on the Three Bond web site and it is OH that cures it. I was going by what I remembered for Eastman 910 data sheets about fifty years ago. And obviously I remembered wrong. Funny though that you can put a drop on something and nothing happens until you put something else against it and squeeze. I guess it is because it has little surface area when it is a drop on a substrate. And when you squeeze it with another piece, you spread it out so it can contact the moisture on the surfaces of both pieces.
Dan
Martin Whybrow wrote:

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When I build RC model airplanes we use to use super glue and we would accelerate it with baking soda. Put some baking soda in a rubber bulb and spray it on the joint. It would cure imediately (with smoke) and the baking soda would make a fillet too.
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Too_Many_Tools wrote:

i remember when superglue was expensive. now it can be bought at the 99 cent store.
FWIW, there are 3 different packaging methods for it.
the "original" is in a plastic tube-thingie with a pin/cap to pierce it.that works ok.
then theres the mini-bottle, which is hit and miss.
mini foil tubes are the worst, they always dry up.
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"the "original" is in a plastic tube-thingie with a pin/cap to pierce it.that works ok. then theres the mini-bottle, which is hit and miss. mini foil tubes are the worst, they always dry up. "
I used to buy the mini-bottle...and quit when I only got one use from it.
I now buy the mini foil tubes...and they seldom last two applications.
Anyone know how they prevent the factory equipment from plugging up with super glue gone bad?
TMT
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for rubber cement bloxegen works well. it works on polyurethane glue too. super glue a bigger bottle. but it sounds like you use so little not much will help but small bottles and throwing it away. Knight-Toolworks http://www.knight-toolworks.com affordable handmade wooden planes
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SoCalMike wrote:

I recently bought superglue in a squeeze-pen dispenser...I don't know how it's going to stand up to the test of time, but it is very easy to control the application.
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I buy most of my super glue in 8 oz. bottles, and it lasts a long time. Am I doing something wrong?
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SoCalMike wrote:

I found that with polyurethane glues the scum which forms on the surface can't be avoided but if you store the containers inverted then the scum won't clog up the nozzle. Refrigerating CA thin works well as I have been refilling the little bottles out of an 8oz bottle that I bought over three year ago.
Phil AMA609
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How long do you leave the glue stored?????
Elmers will last a year or so if capped. Contact cement should last almost indefinitely if properly capped.
Don'e store either one of these in your fridge!
CA has a definite shelf life if approximately 1 year from date of manufacture when properly stored. Storage is generally cool or cold (refrigerator) and away from light. I have had CA last months uncapped in my garage. If you use accelerators, your shelf life will be less.
--
Paul McIntosh
RC-Bearings.com
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Fri, Jan 27, 2006, 9:53am (EST-3) too_many snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Too_Many_Tools) doth wonder: How do you store your various glues? With three different glues, I seldom have success. <snip>
Sooper glue. Once it's opened, it ain't gonna last too long. You buys the smallest amount you plan on using, and get over it.
Contact cement. Never heard it called contact glue. I had a can in my laundry room, for probably 20 years. Opened it up, and prt of it was still usable. I guess the secret is, seal the can tight.
Elmer's Woodworking Glue. I don't use it. I use Titebond II, and if it thickens a bit before I can use it all, I put a bit of water in it, and shake it up. No prob. Just now I've got some that's well over a year old, and still doing just fine.
JOAT You only need two tools: WD-40, and duct tape. If it doesn't move and it should, use WD-40. If it moves and shouldn't, use the tape.
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