Glue brush cleaning jar solution needed.

Page 1 of 2  
I have a jar that I use to clean my brushes, glue rollers and whatever else I use to spread glue.
It's filled with water and gets pretty slimy/gunky at the bottom. If I keep the stuff off the bottom it won't require anything but hitting the stuff with an air gun to dry and then re-use. It gets so scummy quickly that I have to clean them.
I am looking for something that keeps things off the bottom. Preferably _like_ a grid from a flour. light box only way smaller that I can cut to fit in the bottom of the jar.
Anyone got any ideas what I am looking for...
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/20/2012 9:03 AM, tiredofspam wrote:

you can get those grids cheap at the borg. if they have one in the trash you only need a few square inches of one, and you can probably get it free.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/20/2012 12:14 PM, chaniarts wrote:

What grids? The ones from the lights are too big.. The squares would just let the brushes through. I need smaller squares....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/20/2012 11:03 AM, tiredofspam wrote:

Solved the problem my going with two of the new silicone glue brushes, which don't need much cleaning/rinsing, if any.
AAMOF, the more glue you leave on them overnight, the easier it is to remove.
Highly recommended.
--
www.eWoodShop.com
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/20/2012 12:22 PM, Swingman wrote:

I have the brushes. But I stick them in the water so I can reuse them quickly. I have 3 and rotate them... Still use acid brushes for tenons since the problem with the silicone is they don't fit.. I use the poly glue spreaders for dovetails.. the roller for board edge join, and cards for large area face joining..
I find cleaning dry glue from the silicone a pain still, but better than losing a brush.. dropping it in water keeps them ready all the time. I just blow the water out and am ready to go. The silicone is nice when I forget to drop it in water, when I am real busy aligning things. But I need some kind of small grid... something I can cut to size, but the square spacing has to be small enough that even an acid brush won't drop through.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tiredofspam wrote:

Hardware cloth. Window screen material.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's what I was thinking. Maybe a couple of PVC "rings" to keep it off the bottom?
If you don't want metal screen (it might possibly be ok if always submerged), a couple of tacks of a water proof glue (hot glue might work) would allow the screen to be stretched over the rings and keep it from sagging.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/20/2012 12:13 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

I've found that the key to cleaning the silicone brushes ... the more dry glue, the easier and quicker it is to pull it off.
I keep a finish nail handy to reach under bristles, and lift up, on the one's that were stored without sufficient glue to make it easy.
--
www.eWoodShop.com
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Have you looked at the plastic material used for cross-stitching?
John S.
On 07/20/2012 11:03 AM, tiredofspam wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Or was it needlepoint? I don't know the crafts very well. In any case, a visit to the craft store might give you inspiration.
John S.
On 07/20/2012 12:28 PM, John Shear wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/20/2012 1:34 PM, John Shear wrote:

Almost sounds good. the problem is that it will sit on the bottom and not be stiff enough if I glue it to a ring of some sort... Like another top with the hole cut out... But something to think about...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tiredofspam wrote:

I use an empty, upside down tuna can with holes punched in the bottom. Too high tech? :)
It lives in a coffee jar - one of the smaller, red plastic ones - with a lid that has some short slashes in a star pattern. Stick the brush handle through the star, adjust brush so it hangs, put on lid.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/20/2012 1:53 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Too much work :-)... no really, when dealing with a glue up, I just want to chuck the brush in.. no setting the height or anything.
Simple, quick....
There has to be some small grid type stuff out there.
Punching holes isn't going to solve the sludge issue. I want it to drop, and I don't see the glue doing that with holes in a can.. still too much surface area... but might be worth a try... does your can _rust_ in the bottom of the water????
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tiredofspam wrote:

No, it doesn't rust. Actually, for glue, I just put some water in the sink and toss the brush in (it floats). If I used a brush, that is; usually I just dribble on a sine wave of glue, put one piece on the other, slide a bit and clamp.
The tuna can works well for paint too. The paint oozes out of the brush and does drop through the holes in the tuna can. I use the same thing with paint & lacquer thinners.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/20/2012 12:53 PM, dadiOH wrote:

sounded like a solution. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 20 Jul 2012 12:03:07 -0400, tiredofspam wrote:

How about the mesh from a kitchen strainer? Dime a dozen at garage sales.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"tiredofspam" <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in message

Not really an answer to your question but a different approach. In the past I cleaned my glue brushes but found that buying acid brushes for about $16 / gross and chucking them after use is less aggravating and, from a time is money stand point, cheaper. Rollers clean up quick in the sink...
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/20/12 2:10 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

Maybe not all acid brushes are the same, but I stopped using them because I've never been able to finish a glue-up without having to remove a bunch on little black hairs from the seems.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/20/2012 2:33 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Apparently not all are the same. ;~) I see maybe one or two hairs during the life of my brushes. I don't blame you at all for not using.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/20/12 2:49 PM, Leon wrote:

I need to find some good ones, because I do like using them, especially because they are disposable.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.